Recommend
15 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

Mare Balticum» Forums » Reviews

Subject: A good family game? Most probably. A good gamer's game? Not necessarily. rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb

Picture courtesy of Piotro Slaby.



As there have been some negative responses to this review, I'd better clarify my motives for writing it to avoid unnecessary misunderstandings. What prompted me to write this review is that the game was presented as a strategy game to me and that it has been categorised as a strategy game in some stores. Needless to say, many a gamer may be disappointed if they buy this game expecting it to match the depth and complexity of an elaborate strategy game. Thus, the main perspective of this review is that of a strategy gamer, not a family gamer. See it as consumer guidance for strategy gamers if you like.

I'd like to point out that I don't want to deride family games. I think there are plenty of family games, and actually even some children's games, which hardcore gamers very well may like. An example of this is Mondo, which I've written a positive review on and which can be found here.



WHAT YOU GET

Setting: You are a fisherman working in the Baltic Sea, trying to deliver fish in ports where they are in demand.

Time: According to the box, the game takes 30 minutes. I’d say that’s a fairly accurate figure, but it can be played faster than that if all the players are experienced gamers and not prone to analysis paralysis. In other words, this game can serve as a good filler.

Scalability: I've played Mare Balticum with only two players, unaware of the fact that it's for 3-5 players, and it worked just fine; it requires that both players are aggressive to be interesting, though. As for the actual constellations, I’d say that three players is the weakest constellation; there is an element of area control in the game, and with three players, two tend to battle it out while the third collects victory points. Four players is most probably the sweet spot, although the game becomes a little bit more unpredictable, or more chaotic if you like. I have yet to play Mare Balticum with five players.

Components: Some of the components are of conventional board game quality, while others are of good Eurogame quality. The board, the tokens, and player mats are of the lower quality; they will no doubt last many games, but they will definitely show wear eventually. The fishing boat pieces are wooden, the commercial contract cards are sturdy, and the bag is made of a durable fabric; they will most probably last a lifetime.



Picture courtesy of Ender Wiggins.


Aesthetics: This is the Achilles’ heel of Mare Balticum, in my opinion. I’m not very nit-picky about artwork in games, but I find Mare Balticum’s artwork unattractive, bordering on appalling. The illustrations, which evidently are based on clay models, have an almost naïve style and washed-out colours, which rather make me associate to a children’s book from the USSR than an elaborate board game from Gry Leonardo, probably best known for Magnum Sal. This is of course highly subjective, but I think it’s safe to say that far from all gamers will appreciate the aesthetics, though. It simply deviates too much from the current norms. As the aesthetics resembles that of children's books, it may be very well be attractive for young players, though; they are after all part of the target audience for a game like this.

However, I should point out that the artwork is fully functional. It reflects the subject matter very well and the iconography is very distinct. The board could have been clearer, but it’s still functional.

Topic: Mare Balticum is a very good abstraction of the fishing trade, in my opinion. Almost all of the mechanisms make sense and are intuitive: you sail, you fish, you unload. The time mechanism, i.e. that the game ends after drawing the sixth time token, may seem artificial, but it actually makes sense; it represents the end of the season, i.e. that winter is coming and the Baltic Sea will freeze. The betting mechanism, i.e. the placing of company tokens on the different types of fish, feels a bit contrived, though. Perhaps it can be seen as investments in different kinds of fishing equipment, but I know too little about the fishing industry to answer that.


PLAYING THE GAME

Rules: The aspect of Mare Balticum that impresses me the most is the rules. Both in terms of reading and explaining the rules, they shouldn’t present any serious problems for newcomers to the hobby, and they should be as easy as spurning Monopoly for seasoned gamers.

Gameplay: Mare Balticum is in essence a combination of three game mechanisms: pick-up-and-deliver, area control, and betting. The rules can be easily summarised in a few points, only simplifying them very slightly:

▪ A player may carry out three actions every turn, and there are three types of actions: sailing, fishing, and unloading. The player may choose to carry out one type of action more than once a turn.

▪ Sailing means that a player may move one of their boats to any space on the board, but with one restriction: the fleet may not be divided, i.e. each boat must be adjacent to another boat. A player can only have one boat in a space, but players can have one boat each in a space.

▪ Fishing means that a player may fish in a space where they have a boat, i.e. pick up a token and place it in a free cargo space on their player mat. If there are no tokens or boats in an empty space, it’s replenished, i.e. new tokens are drawn from a bag. There are also amber tokens, which are placed directly in the warehouse, see below.

▪ Unloading means that a player may deliver tokens in a port where there’s demand, i.e. where there’s a corresponding token. The tokens are then moved from the cargo spaces to the warehouse spaces on the player’s mat, and will be used for calculating the player’s score at the end of the game.

▪ When a time token is drawn from the bag, every player has to place a company token face-down on a market space on the player’s mat; there’s one market space for every type of fish. The company tokens are multipliers, so this is in effect a kind of betting on which kinds of fish the player thinks they can deliver the largest quantities of. Amber tokens have a fixed number of points and are not affected by any company tokens.



Picture courtesy of Ender Wiggins.


▪ There are six time tokens in total, and when the sixth one is drawn, the game ends. The players calculate their scores by counting the number of fish in their warehouses and multiplying the numbers of the fish with the numbers of the corresponding company tokens, and add one point for every amber token.

▪ Optional: Cards called commercial contracts are included and can be used to achieve a little more variation and depth; just like the name suggests, they offer the players opportunities to fulfil contracts and earn extra points. It’s voluntary to pick a commercial contract card and you can pick any remaining card from the stack; your card will, however, remain secret until the end of the game.

Balance: There are no balance issues in Mare Balticum unless you count the luck factor, which is discussed below. The players can’t upgrade their fleets, build processing plants, or optimise their operations in any other ways, so they have the same opportunities throughout the whole game. The starting player doesn’t really have any advantage either, as far as I can see. It’s of course possible for the starting player to grab some attractive tokens in the first round, but the other players are compensated by the fact that they can adapt their strategies for controlling areas when they see the starting player’s manoeuvers.


PLAY VALUE

Depth: Mare Balticum offers a fair amount of decisions and strategies, but it’s by no means a deep game. I’d say it’s possible for a fairly seasoned gamer to crack the code very quickly; after one or two games, you know what to do and what not to do, how to win and how to lose.

Luck: Luck is a factor in this game, but one can debate exactly how big an impact it has on the game. As mentioned above, the fish tokens are drawn from a bag. If the right tokens end up in spaces close to your boats and ports where they are in demand, you will be at a clear advantage, and vice versa. This is not easily mitigated, because manoeuvring your fleet across several spaces costs you many valuable actions. As it's a short game, it's not that big an issue, though.



Picture courtesy of Nikos Hee.


Fun: Personally, I don’t find Mare Balticum to be very engaging, only mildly enjoyable in a filler-ish way. The decisions are not that complicated, and the competition is not tough enough to create tension; it’s not a game that is likely to engender laughter and banter and groans around the table. However, the game never feels pointless and it never gets slow, so it’s certainly not a boring or tedious game. It’s simply not very exciting, in my opinion.

Replayability: I’m skating on thin ice here, as I haven’t played Mare Balticum that many times, but I can’t see that it possibly can offer extraordinary replay value. There are simply too few means of variation and too few viable strategies. If you decide to buy this game, I think it’s a good idea not to play it too often or too many times in a row, but rather to use it as a starter every now and then.


WORTH GETTING?

Mare Balticum is most probably a good family game. The rules are very intuitive (sail, fish, unloud), the gameplay is smooth indeed without an abundance of rules, the subject matter is familiar to most people, and the aesthetics is definitely family-friendly. For these reasons, I think it could serve its purpose as a good family game; even very young children may grasp the gameplay, and I don’t think older non-gamers will find it discouragingly difficult. For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical teenage geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus.

Suitable as a family game and so-called gateway game or not, it’s not really a gamer’s game. It may appear to be a full-blown strategy game, but it’s essentially a rather simple filler. As such, it may serve as good a starter for Eurogamers, because I’d say that it’s a light-weight variety of a pick-up-and-deliver Eurogame.

However, I hesitate to recommend Mare Balticum to strategy gamers for the following reasons: 1) As mentioned above, there’s not much depth, so it’s essentially a filler. Nevertheless, it commands a price of at least €30, and it seems to be somewhat difficult to find, which may engender an even higher price. Considering how many excellent fillers there are on the market, I’m not sure Mare Balticum is worth the money. 2) The replay value is dubious. The game offers few means of variation, and the number of strategies is limited. Again, I’m not entirely sure it’s worth the money. 3) We all have different aesthetic preferences, but Mare Balticum’s aesthetics is de facto unconventional, so there's a risk you won’t appreciate it.

An alternative to Mare Balticum is Hansa. The gameplay and subject matter resemble Mare Balticum’s in some respects, but it arguably offers slightly more depth, slightly better replay value, and markedly more attractive aesthetics, and it’s easier to find and at a lower price as well. However, the gameplay doesn’t correlate as well with the topic in Hansa, and the topic is arguably dryer too.

To summarise my review in one sentence, Mare Balticum is not a bad game so you might want to buy it, but you will probably be disappointed if you expect a deep game with good replay value.

Note: I've made some changes to the original review (thanks to neilhora for constructive feedback), but for the better or the worse, my conclusions remain the same. I hope this review will pass the censorship of the Family Gamer Council now.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim Otto

Cherokee
Kansas
msg tools
He said something to me in Chinese like, 'Boo coo sow!', sounded like some cartoon sh!t. But I understood it to be a question...
badge
Ha-ha! I threw that sh!t before I walked in the room!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
Mare Balticum’s aesthetics are the reason I bought it. I don't doubt there are many like you that don't like the artwork, but I'm not sure I would go so far as "chances are you won’t appreciate it".
16 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Neil Horabin
United Kingdom
Hounslow
Middlesex
flag msg tools
badge
Spearmint - A Different Lifetime
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
EquateBrand wrote:
Mare Balticum’s aesthetics are the reason I bought it. I don't doubt there are many like you that don't like the artwork, but I'm not sure I would go so far as "chances are you won’t appreciate it".


I agree. In fact I'm not sure why you picked the game up, what were you expecting it to be? To me it was a lovely game to get my children playing, then aged 7 and 8, and we all loved the graphics. It's bright, functional, thematic and does bear repeated game play. Luck comes around in life sometimes and so I quite like having to work my around it occasionally. How many trawlermen know what they're going to pull up every time they cast their nets, even allowing for sophisticated radar?!

Also have to say that the quality of the tokens you also labelled poor are considerably better than some very highly regarded games, I'd say they were 'good' at least.

I do appreciate the effort you've put into your review though, well done!

Finally, you can pick up the game here for €14, maybe that would increase your 'value' definition; http://www.sklep-graal.pl/pl/p/Mare-Balticum/3
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
EquateBrand wrote:
Mare Balticum’s aesthetics are the reason I bought it. I don't doubt there are many like you that don't like the artwork, but I'm not sure I would go so far as "chances are you won’t appreciate it".


I certainly respect that opinion. As I've pointed out in the review, it's quite subjective. However, I maintain that there's less than a marginal risk that a gamer won't appreciate it; compare Mare Balticum to a typical Eurogame or a typical Ameritrash game, and I say that its aesthetics deviates considerably from what's common nowadays.

neilhora wrote:
EquateBrand wrote:
Mare Balticum’s aesthetics are the reason I bought it. I don't doubt there are many like you that don't like the artwork, but I'm not sure I would go so far as "chances are you won’t appreciate it".


I agree. In fact I'm not sure why you picked the game up, what were you expecting it to be? To me it was a lovely game to get my children playing, then aged 7 and 8, and we all loved the graphics. It's bright, functional, thematic and does bear repeated game play. Luck comes around in life sometimes and so I quite like having to work my around it occasionally. How many trawlermen know what they're going to pull up every time they cast their nets, even allowing for sophisticated radar?!


First, I didn't "pick the game up"; I've played it, but I don't own it.

Second, I point out in the review that it's suitable as a family game. A family game is not necessarily the same thing as a gamer's game, though.

Third, the luck factor isn't necessarily something negative in my book; I do, for instance, love Innovation, a game in which the luck factor arguably can be decisive. Admittedly, I didn't point this out in the review, so I guess I have myself to blame.

neilhora wrote:
Also have to say that the quality of the tokens you also labelled poor are considerably better than some very highly regarded games, I'd say they were 'good' at least.


I never used the word "poor". Allow me to quote my own review: "Some of the components are of conventional board game quality, while others are of good Eurogame quality. The board, the tokens, and player mats are of the lower quality; they will no doubt last many games, but they will definitely show wear eventually."

neilhora wrote:
I do appreciate the effort you've put into your review though, well done!

Finally, you can pick up the game here for €14, maybe that would increase your 'value' definition; http://www.sklep-graal.pl/pl/p/Mare-Balticum/3


You do realise that I write reviews to inform other gamers, don't you? If you love this game, I totally respect that. However, when I write a review, I have to try to figure out what "the average gamer" might like and dislike about the game in question. My objective is not to bash Mare Balticum, but to give as objective a review of the game as I can, and I think I've done that.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Patrick C.
United States
Milford
New Hampshire
flag msg tools
Because I served, I will resist
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
I would say your analysis was objective in the sense that you pointed out it wasn't a gamer's game. However, what is not objective is that you are critical for what it isn't and ignored what it is.

The publisher's recommended age for this game is 6. The industry standard for games that start to be appropriate for adult only enjoyment starts at about age 8. Thus, Mare Baltcum is, by definition, a children's game or family game. I would challenge you to find ANY game in the BGG database that has a publisher recommended age of 6 that is a gamer's game. Hey, That's My Fish! is, according to the publisher, a game for 8 and up. That's about as close as you're going to get to "children's game" and "gamer's game."

As someone who plays games with children I find reviews of such games here on BGG to be extremely unhelpful. Games for children 7 and under cannot be judged by gamer standards. It's reductionist and it doesn't help the target purchasing audience - parents or anyone buying games for children.

I definitely don't see your review as especially egregious in criticizing a children's game. I just see it as part of the general reductionist mindset here on BGG. It's a not a feature of BGG, it's a flaw. Children's games need to be somehow isolated or at least better defined within the database. The rankings and ratings are close to worthless to parents because so many reviews and comments never analyze these games for their intended purpose and audience.

This recently came up for debate in a separate discussion. What I want to know is, if BGG is going to continue judging games based on one's individual personal desire to play them then why even bother having a children's category at all? If all games are going to be rated by adult standards then why bother even labeling them games for children? Just say they're "bad games" and leave it at that.

I being a little facetious, but I'm annoyed with how this issue is handled here on BGG. It needs to be addressed by the admins. Gamers have children. This isn't just about random non-gamers visiting the site and being misled into thinking Loopin' Louie is the best children's game ever created. This is about gamers who have kids who would like to know what games they can share with their children. Mare Balticum is easily one of the better games for children that will still hold the attention of adults. But how will gamers know this if it's judged by BGG's illogical rating system?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
travvller wrote:
I would say your analysis was objective in the sense that you pointed out it wasn't a gamer's game. However, what is not objective is that you are critical for what it isn't and ignored what it is.

The publisher's recommended age for this game is 6. The industry standard for games that start to be appropriate for adult only enjoyment starts at about age 8. Thus, Mare Baltcum is, by definition, a children's game or family game. I would challenge you to find ANY game in the BGG database that has a publisher recommended age of 6 that is a gamer's game. Hey, That's My Fish! is, according to the publisher, a game for 8 and up. That's about as close as you're going to get to "children's game" and "gamer's game."

As someone who plays games with children I find reviews of such games here on BGG to be extremely unhelpful. Games for children 7 and under cannot be judged by gamer standards. It's reductionist and it doesn't help the target purchasing audience - parents or anyone buying games for children.

I definitely don't see your review as especially egregious in criticizing a children's game. I just see it as part of the general reductionist mindset here on BGG. It's a not a feature of BGG, it's a flaw. Children's games need to be somehow isolated or at least better defined within the database. The rankings and ratings are close to worthless to parents because so many reviews and comments never analyze these games for their intended purpose and audience.

This recently came up for debate in a separate discussion. What I want to know is, if BGG is going to continue judging games based on one's individual personal desire to play them then why even bother having a children's category at all? If all games are going to be rated by adult standards then why bother even labeling them games for children? Just say they're "bad games" and leave it at that.

I being a little facetious, but I'm annoyed with how this issue is handled here on BGG. It needs to be addressed by the admins. Gamers have children. This isn't just about random non-gamers visiting the site and being misled into thinking Loopin' Louie is the best children's game ever created. This is about gamers who have kids who would like to know what games they can share with their children. Mare Balticum is easily one of the better games for children that will still hold the attention of adults. But how will gamers know this if it's judged by BGG's illogical rating system?


Have you even read my review? Allow me to quote myself: "Mare Balticum is definitely not a bad game. The rules are very intuitive, the gameplay is smooth indeed, and the subject matter is unusual. For these reasons, I think it could serve as a very good family game; even very young children may grasp the gameplay, and I don’t think older non-gamers will find it discouragingly different from conventional board games like Monopoly or Risk. For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus."
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Neil Horabin
United Kingdom
Hounslow
Middlesex
flag msg tools
badge
Spearmint - A Different Lifetime
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
Butsudoka wrote:
Have you even read my review? Allow me to quote myself: "Mare Balticum is definitely not a bad game. The rules are very intuitive, the gameplay is smooth indeed, and the subject matter is unusual. For these reasons, I think it could serve as a very good family game; even very young children may grasp the gameplay, and I don’t think older non-gamers will find it discouragingly different from conventional board games like Monopoly or Risk. For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus."


You see the problem is;

1. People read the title: "Not a bad game, but don't expect depth"

People could interpret this very negatively, "not a bad game" is not the same as a good game, the use of 'not' and 'bad' are, after all, negative words. Similarly 'but' and 'don't expect' are negative too. I was interested to read what your expectations were of the game, and indeed why you had labelled it so negatively. You rightly point out that your comments are in fact positive on the whole, it's a shame the title wasn't more inviting!

2. People read the last paragraph/sentence for a summary of your review: "Mare Balticum is not a bad game so you might want to buy it, but you will probably be disappointed if you expect a deep game with good replay value." Comments as above.

2. This is a relatively unknown game so anyone considering it may scan the forums to gauge people's thoughts on it. I look for the number of requests for rule clarifications for example, and pick up on reviews too. A number of negative titles will switch me off pretty quickly unless I have enough time to consider the comments in detail, which fortunately I do quite frequently, just not every time!

3. Having thoroughly read your review maybe some more context at the beginning about who you were reviewing this for, why you had chosen it, could, perhaps, have been helpful. Tell us how perfect you think it might be for younger children - that is who it's aimed at after all! - don't tell us who it won't suit.

Again, let me say how impressed I am at the detail of your review for a game you don't even own.

4. To compare it to Monopoly and Risk was also a mistake in my opinion. Both are regarded very negatively by the majority of the community here and Mare Balticum has nothing in common with unwieldy, time-consuming, over-hyped games. Again the language you have used in that part of your summary is hardly 'would work well for older non-gamers'... try to find more positive language rather than non-negative.

Keep reviewing though, it is important!

6 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Russ Williams
Poland
Wrocław
Dolny Śląsk
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
A couple of small corrections:

Butsudoka wrote:
2-4 players

It's for 3-5 players.

Quote:
drawing technique

The art was not drawn, but made from modeling clay.
8 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
neilhora wrote:
Butsudoka wrote:
Have you even read my review? Allow me to quote myself: "Mare Balticum is definitely not a bad game. The rules are very intuitive, the gameplay is smooth indeed, and the subject matter is unusual. For these reasons, I think it could serve as a very good family game; even very young children may grasp the gameplay, and I don’t think older non-gamers will find it discouragingly different from conventional board games like Monopoly or Risk. For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus."


You see the problem is;

1. People read the title: "Not a bad game, but don't expect depth"

People could interpret this very negatively, "not a bad game" is not the same as a good game, the use of 'not' and 'bad' are, after all, negative words. Similarly 'but' and 'don't expect' are negative too. I was interested to read what your expectations were of the game, and indeed why you had labelled it so negatively. You rightly point out that your comments are in fact positive on the whole, it's a shame the title wasn't more inviting!

2. People read the last paragraph/sentence for a summary of your review: "Mare Balticum is not a bad game so you might want to buy it, but you will probably be disappointed if you expect a deep game with good replay value." Comments as above.

2. This is a relatively unknown game so anyone considering it may scan the forums to gauge people's thoughts on it. I look for the number of requests for rule clarifications for example, and pick up on reviews too. A number of negative titles will switch me off pretty quickly unless I have enough time to consider the comments in detail, which fortunately I do quite frequently, just not every time!

3. Having thoroughly read your review maybe some more context at the beginning about who you were reviewing this for, why you had chosen it, could, perhaps, have been helpful. Tell us how perfect you think it might be for younger children - that is who it's aimed at after all! - don't tell us who it won't suit.

Again, let me say how impressed I am at the detail of your review for a game you don't even own.

4. To compare it to Monopoly and Risk was also a mistake in my opinion. Both are regarded very negatively by the majority of the community here and Mare Balticum has nothing in common with unwieldy, time-consuming, over-hyped games. Again the language you have used in that part of your summary is hardly 'would work well for older non-gamers'... try to find more positive language rather than non-negative.

Keep reviewing though, it is important!


Thank you, that's constructive criticism! I'll follow your advice.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Re: Not a bad game, but don’t expect depth
russ wrote:
A couple of small corrections:

Butsudoka wrote:
2-4 players

It's for 3-5 players.

Quote:
drawing technique

The art was not drawn, but made from modeling clay.


Thank you for the corrections. I'd like to take the opportunity to express my admiration for your thorough review on this game; I dare say I've never read anything but excellent reviews by you. The purpose of my review is somehwat different, something which I need to communicate better.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Derek H
South Africa
Johannesburg
Gauteng
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Not a member of the Family Gamer Council (well, a past member ), but just one nit to pick:

Quote:
For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus.


Er, you can say "the lack of typical sci-fi/fantasy elements" but you cannot use the term "geek" in such a broad-brush manner. The term "geek" is commonly accepted to mean a person who is passionate and well-informed about a niche interest, often technical, in life - maths, bicycles, engines, games etc. (Wikipedia says "someone who is interested in a subject, usually intellectual or complex, for its own sake.") There are many "boardgame geeks" here, for example, who don't like fantasy or sci-fi elements in their games.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Life is a lamp-flame before a wind.
msg tools
badge
mu
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gamesbook wrote:
Not a member of the Family Gamer Council (well, a past member ), but just one nit to pick:

Quote:
For similar reasons, it could also serve as a very good game for introducing new people to the hobby; the lack of typical geek elements like orcs and space marines is obviously a bonus.


Er, you can say "the lack of typical sci-fi/fantasy elements" but you cannot use the term "geek" in such a broad-brush manner. The term "geek" is commonly accepted to mean a person who is passionate and well-informed about a niche interest, often technical, in life - maths, bicycles, engines, games etc. (Wikipedia says "someone who is interested in a subject, usually intellectual or complex, for its own sake.") There are many "boardgame geeks" here, for example, who don't like fantasy or sci-fi elements in their games.


Fixed.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.