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Gettysburg 150» Forums » General

Subject: Question on Union forces... rss

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Bradley Fletcher
United States
Maine
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I'm really curious, and have been waiting to see, the Union counter sheet. How many Union counters are there? I know, and can see, that the South is represented by half divisions and artillery--but I can't figure out how many Union there are? I know that they are represented by corps--but is it a counter per corps? What are the brigade units for? How do the infantry units and artillery interact in the game? I'm really curious how this all is represented before I dive in or make judgements.
 
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Norman Smith
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Bradley, I am in the middle of play, so can't group all the corp together to give you a definitive, but as an example, XII Corps (Slocum)' has, Slocum, Williams 4 steps, Geary 4 steps, Muhlenburg art 2 steps. Reynolds I Corps has Reynolds, Wadsworth, wainwright artillery, Robinson, and Doubleday. Each union formation seems to be a full counter in use at anyone time, unlike the confederates that have two counters identified as A and B.
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Bradley Fletcher
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Maine
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Thanks, Norm, I wish Worthington would post full images of the counter sheets! While I'm here, over on CSW I see there are posts concerning the arrival of Jenkins cavalry. I remembered that, in AH's Gettysburg 77 (intermediate game) he arrives with Early as well, but is restricted to one mp the first turn on board. It would be interested to know about other, similarly scaled games, but I'll bet that is pretty standard. I think he is generally used to watch the left flank--which according to posts on CSW is what his orders were by mid-afternoon, although not carried out, so it sounds like the game has it about right--if he is a bit limited at first?
 
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Norman Smith
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The problem I had with Jenkins was that he can move at cavalry rate towards the VP hex on Baltimore road. That threat is so great that it causes some early counter moves by the Union that diverts precious strength away from the developing crisis at Cemetery Hill, so in that regard, unrestricted use of Jenkins in this game gives him a too great capability and the history comes under pressure.
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Bradley Fletcher
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Maine
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Yes, I understand. On another note, I'm curious if you played--and, if so, what you thought of--Wallace's Gettysburg game? I really enjoyed his Waterloo--although, component-wise it is clunky, and while Gburg had some interesting ideas about managing/moving your units, in the end it didn't grab me. (And I thought of it when I saw that you spelled Cemetery Hill correctly--reminding me that his beautiful map is marred with a prominent "Cemetary Hill" smack dab in the middle of it. Worth noting, I guess, that I'm a teacher and spelling really matters to me!)
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Norman Smith
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I have played both the Waterloo and Gettysburg games and both felt too generic for me and seemed like I had to learn a new system for no real benefit. Themed rather than sim, though that is in keeping with the design intent.
 
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Barry Kendall
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Lebanon
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I too have both of Wallace's games. They are quite different in how they play. Wallace's Waterloo gives, in my view, a wonderful "impressionistic" depiction of the battle, with interesting decisions for both players to make regarding avenues of advance, defensive priorities, use of cavalry, timing, and management of forces.

His "Gettysburg" is, I found, much more restrictive. The Federal player has almost no prospect for offensive action at all; the Confederate player must think several turns ahead and manage carefully in order to launch an assault that has a realistic prospect of success ("Plan it well, do plan it well, I pray you, sir: we stake everything on this"--Lee in the film "Gettysburg").

Both games, I think, are designed to portray the dynamics of the particular battle they represent, without bogging down in simulation detail. I believe they both succeed in this. But "Gettysburg" is little more than a passive exercise in anticipation for the Federal player, who must react to Confederate initiative advantages built into the design.

"Gettysburg 150" is much more dynamic, and the Federal player does indeed have opportunities to counterattack and even to take the initiative and assault the Confederate Army (though why a Federal player would so choose, if in possession of the valuable Victory Point hexes, is hard to imagine apart from sheer cockiness or Unionist fervor).
 
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