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I Will Fight No More... Forever» Forums » Sessions

Subject: Solo play of the flight of the Nez Perce to freedom rss

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Tim
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Frederick
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I have been interested in the journey of the Nez Pierce and their near escape into Canada ever since being taught about it in high school and seeing a documentary on their journey back in the late 70s. Their journey and their desire to just be free have always touched my heart. It’s even worse to think about that they were only 100 miles from their goal. Anyway, I Will Fight No More…Forever has been one of my grail games ever since I realized that there was a game on this subject matter. Patience finally paid off and I was able to get a copy. I immediately set it up to play, which is rare because most of the games that I get usually sit on the shelf for awhile until I get through some other games that have been on the shelf for awhile. In looking further at the entry here on BGG, I was surprised to find that no one had written a session report on this yet (even though the game was published in 1979). So, I knew that I had to write one for this overlooked classic. This is my solo replay of my second game after my first play where I made some rules mistakes and strategy errors.

For clarification, the army units are in blue, Nez Perce units in orange.



This is the set-up of the game. For the first nine turns, the Indian units have to stay within the borders of Idaho.

Turn 1: Army units commanded by Capt. Whipple and those of the Walla Wall volunteers crossed the Snake River into Idaho to try and “contain” the Indian unrest.

Turn 2: Reinforcements arrive at Fort Wall Walla and the army positions itself to surround the Indians. The Indians moved southeast to avoid contact.

Turn 3: More reinforcements arrive at Ft. Walla Walla, which move across the Snake River. All Indian units are still moving in the same direction although not moving together.



Turn 4: More reinforcements arrive at Ft. Wall Walla.

Turn 5: Walla Walla volunteer units search for Chief Joseph in wooded mountains but are unable to actually find him. Looking Glass is nearly surrounded by army units but is feeling safe in the major mountains of Idaho.



Turn 6: Toohool and Red Cloud warriors surprise the Walla Walla volunteer units on the trail. A tactical battle ensues:



Wall Walla unit kills one Red Cloud unit and three Red Cloud units converge to attack. However, the army unit suffers only a Moral hit and was able to escape.

Capt. Whipple now moves into the area coming across the two warrior bands but the Indians are elusive.

Turn 7: Chief Joseph now joins up with White Bird and Oliokot, while Toohool and Red Cloud move south and Looking Glass makes a break for it to northern Idaho. The army abandons its pursuit of Looking Glass and moves south to join in the pursuit of Joseph. Capt. Whipple is relentless but his tracking skills are not his best quality and he cannot pinpoint Chief Joseph’s location.

Turn 8: The Indian units are feeling fairly safe right now and rest in the same location. The army moves to surround the Indian units to contain them.

Turn 9: Reinforcements arrive at Boise. Lean Elk teams up with Red Echo and Toohool at the Idaho/Wyoming border. The Washington volunteers team up with Capt. Whipple and locate Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot in an alerted state in wooded mountain terrain.



The Indians escape with all of their units except one Toohool Warrior was killed.

Turn 10: The Indian units now start to move east across the Idaho border.

Turn 11: Reinforcements arrive at Ft. Ellis. Chief Joseph continues to move east as he and two warrior bands must be south of the Yellowstone River by Turn 25 (this is the major river starting in the middle of the eastern side of the board).



Turn 12: Army units start to surround Chief Joseph just outside Virginia City, Montana.

Turn 13: More army reinforcements arrive and Chief Joseph manages to escape through a narrow opening in the south:



Units of the Walla Walla volunteers, Green, Mason, and Wiles locate Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot in some major mountains. The Indian units take some heavy losses in battle including one lodge (which will be detrimental to the army victory points). Mason lost one of his units.

Turn 14: Chief Joseph and the two Indian warrior bands move near the Wyoming border. The Washington volunteers get close to finding them but the Indian units are too elusive.

Turn 15: More reinforcements arrive at Virginia City. Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot move west in an attempt to elude their pursuants. The Washington volunteers and Whipple catch up with them in rolling hills but bad luck resulted in their inability to actually find them. The rest of the army sets up a “wall” to prevent the Indian units from entering into Wyoming without coming into contact with some army units.



Turn 16: Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot get word of this “wall” and decide to move west to try and circle back up north and circumvent the barrier. However, this takes time and Green, Whipple, and the Washington volunteer units find the Indians in an alerted state in rolling hill terrain. A fight breaks out and the Washington volunteers lose two units but the Indians escape unharmed.

Turn 17: Afterwards, Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot start to move north and are being pursued by the Walla Walla volunteer units and those of Captain Burton. The rest of the army stays in their position in case the Indians decide to double-back again to the east.

Turn 18: The Indian units rest by a stream just outside the reach of the pursuants.

Turn 19: Reinforcements arrive at Ft. Ellis (Lt. Doane), Ft. Mckinney (Maj. Hart), and Ft. Smith (Col. Sturgis and Maj. Meril). Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot move southeast quickly after the rest.

Turn 20: A reinforcement arrives at Ft. Ellis (Capt. Cushing). The army tries to wall off the Indians, forcing them north, knowing they must get south of the Yellowstone River.



Turn 21: Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot continue to move north avoiding contact with the army units (This was probably a strategic mistake and should have tried to “bust” through the line at the weakest point). Lt. Doane and Capt. Norwood catch up in the major mountains along the Idaho/Montana border but cannot secure their location in such rough terrain.

Turn 22: Maj. Green and Capt. Whipple surprise Chief Joseph on the trail in wooded mountain terrain. Realizing they were vastly outnumbered, the army units broke off the attack to wait for more reinforcements at a later turn.

Turn 23: Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot cross over into Montana. The Washington volunteers, Gen. Howard, and Capt. Perry cannot locate them in major mountain terrain.

Turn 24: Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot turn directly south just northwest of Butte. Lt. Jackson, Capt. Browning, Capt. Mason, Capt. Wiles, and the Virginia City volunteers meet up with them in an alerted state in the open plains. The open plains were too open for the Indian fighters and White Bird and Oliokot lose some warriors to the sharpshooters under Jackson’s command.

Turn 25: More reinforcements arrive at Ft. Keogh, which is on the northern banks of the Yellowstone River. It was decided to have Oliokot and White Bird go on ahead of Chief Joseph and the Indian lodges to try and minimize any more Indian warrior losses. Meanwhile, Looking Glass, Red Echo, Lean Elk, and Toohool await at the Canadian border to cross over at the right time (Indian units cannot cross over the border until after Turn 25). With no chance to actually make meaningful contact, the army units decide to try and cut off their path to the east.



Turn 26: Chief Joseph, White Bird, and Oliokot move east now realizing their chances of getting into Canada are almost zero. Hopefully they can hold off the army units without any more warrior losses. Meanwhile, Looking Glass, Red Echo, Lean Elk, and Toohool cross over into Canada and into freedom.

Turn 27: The last reinforcements arrive at Ft. Benton.

Turn 28: Chief Joseph meet up again with White Bird and Oliokot in major mountain terrain of western Wyoming.

Turn 29: This is the last turn and the remaining Indian units manage to avoid further contact with the army. At this point, they sue for peace and surrender peacefully.



Final Points:
Army: +70 points for 14 braves killed in battle
-8 points for one Indian lodge destroyed

Indian: +16 points for four Indian units crossing into Canada
+48 points for eight Indian lodges still in the US
+4 points for two Indian units still in the US

Final tally: -6 points for a Major Indian victory

Although I did know that the army would lose points for destroying Indian lodges in battle (this was the mistake I made in the first game that I played), I did not see that the Indians would get so many points for still having lodges in the US. The only way to avoid this problem is to have the lodges surrender (thereby giving extra points to the army). However, this is extremely difficult to do as one must surround the lodge with army units so there is no possible escape, which in my opinion is one short coming of the game system. Also, as the army player, I should have tried to initiate more battles and eliminate more warrior units.

I definitely look forward to playing this again and I find this game works well solo and is a challenge for both the Indian and Army side. I am not disappointed with finally playing one of my grail games and hopefully this will inspire those of you who have the game to actually play it (as of January 3, 2014 there are only four recorded plays and three of them are mine).
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Lance McMillan
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Thanks so much for posting this. Like you, I've long been interested in this campaign and wished I'd picked up a copy of this game when I had the chance. Nice to get an idea of what I missed out on.
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Stacey Hager
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I've had an affinity for Native history for many years....and Chief Joseph remains my favorite historical character from those peoples. I'm quite stunned that there is a game based upon the retreat of the Nez Perce.
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Mike W
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Great session report.

I am in a similar situation to you -- I am fascinated by the subject and when I found out this was pretty much the only game on the subject I was very interested in it. There is limited info on the game available, so your session report is an awesome resource -- thanks! Of course, now I want the game more than ever.

Also -- I remember the auction where you BIN'd this game -- great deal, and you beat me by about 20 minutes!
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stephen newberg
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Very nice AAR. Sorry I did not run across it sooner, but I do not come to BGG a lot and seldom check up on my old games. However, as this one is now contracted to Compass Games to be republished via their Paper Wars magazine, I thought I had best see what there might be about it here. I will try to keep a more close watch from now on.

For what it is worth, I have done one other game on Native North American campaigns, it covering the Apache Wars, and Compass has recently contracted to publish it also. It has not been published before and is a block type game, titled ONCE WE MOVED LIKE THE WIND.

best,
Stephen Newberg
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Tim
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stephen newberg wrote:
Very nice AAR. Sorry I did not run across it sooner, but I do not come to BGG a lot and seldom check up on my old games. However, as this one is now contracted to Compass Games to be republished via their Paper Wars magazine, I thought I had best see what there might be about it here. I will try to keep a more close watch from now on.

For what it is worth, I have done one other game on Native North American campaigns, it covering the Apache Wars, and Compass has recently contracted to publish it also. It has not been published before and is a block type game, titled ONCE WE MOVED LIKE THE WIND.

best,
Stephen Newberg


Looking forward to seeing it Stephen. This in my opinion is an under-estimated period in gaming although recently a few more titles have started to appear.

Cheers,
Tim
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Mike W
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stephen newberg wrote:
Very nice AAR. Sorry I did not run across it sooner, but I do not come to BGG a lot and seldom check up on my old games. However, as this one is now contracted to Compass Games to be republished via their Paper Wars magazine, I thought I had best see what there might be about it here. I will try to keep a more close watch from now on.

For what it is worth, I have done one other game on Native North American campaigns, it covering the Apache Wars, and Compass has recently contracted to publish it also. It has not been published before and is a block type game, titled ONCE WE MOVED LIKE THE WIND.

best,
Stephen Newberg


Great news. Let us know when it is imminent, as it will probably be an insta-buy for me.
 
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stephen newberg
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Sure, I will post here when I have more date info. They are currently telling me they are aiming for June of next year, that is 2016 for both games.

smn
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