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Subject: 3 things I love about Eldritch Horror (and some missed opportunities) rss

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Hassan Lopez
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There have been a plethora of reviews for Eldritch Horror (EH) as of late, and no wonder. The Arkham Horror (AH) franchise is one of FFG's most popular and longstanding, and many of us were curious to see what would change with this new manifestation. Rather than do a lengthy review or even a detailed comparison (which I'm sure you can find elsewhere), let me tell you three quick things that I love about EH - and 3 things that still, admittedly unfairly, nag at me.


Positive #1: Exploring locations is fun and strategic

There's no doubt that Corey K. et al. set out to deliver a more cohesive narrative experience in EH, and by all accounts, I think they've succeeded. Several factors contribute to this. A globetrotting romp through cities both familiar and exotic breaths new life into the classic "oh crap, here comes Cthulhu" experience. After years of exploration, Arkham was starting to feel a bit tight - constrained - vicious. The Unnamable? The Black Cave? The Graveyard? These don't sound like fun places to visit. And they weren't. You moved there to gather a clue token or two, but there was always a price to be paid. A pound of flesh or a slice of your soul, either way, nothing was free. But what motivation was there to visit the Newspaper or Velma's Diner? Given that clues rarely appeared at these locations and you were never certain of a reward, you'd rarely waste a turn even with those wackos at the Lodge. Furthermore, if you visited a shop or the Science Building or anyplace else to take an action, you couldn't draw an encounter and get a narrative experience. How many unique encounters did you have at the General Store?

In EH, you draw an encounter card at every location you visit. And every single one provides a unique narrative experience, building the story and providing new twists and turns. More importantly, most encounters are rewarding. Instead of, "You passed the skill test, nothing bad happens to you! (AH)", we now have, "You passed the skill test, here's something good! (EH)." At least, that's how it feels to me. And each city in the world is designed to provide a specific benefit. Monsters starting to overflow the board? Visit Tokyo. Need to bulk up your Influence, since you didn't realize how important it is? Visit Istanbul. A nasty Mi-Go eating all your clues? Visit London. For this reason alone, EH feels less "random" to me than AH - even though I know that's a loaded term.



Positive #2: Fiddly-ness minimized

No more cash to collect (or closed gates or defeated monster tokens). Now you just roll Influence checks and see what you can afford. Desperately want that Carbine rifle? Take out a loan. Done. No more of those annoying skill sliders from AH. Sure, it was a (somewhat) interesting decision to make every turn - and I liked the concept of Focus as a gameplay mechanic - but was the benefit worth the fiddly-ness? Monster movement? Gone. The crazy rules surrounding Monster Surges, the Outskirts, Terror Level, and who knows what else? Gone. Thank god.



Turns move quickly, and more time is spent discussing options and cooperative strategy than managing the game system. Even the Mythos phase, which is still the most "rule-heavy", has been trimmed down a bit.


Positive #3: Tension builds and the entire game arc is satisfying

I admit - I was one of the few cautious ones that didn't invest too heavily in the AH system. I owned the base game, the King in Yellow, and the Dunwich Horror. Having said that, I think many players of AH can agree that pacing and tension was always a problem. Things got ugly fast, but once you sealed a few gates, the endgame's tension dissipated. Expansions attempted to alleviate this, but it was always a problem for me. Furthermore, sealing gates was a repetitive experience.

In EH, you build a unique Mythos deck for every GOO. The cards are sorted in such a way that the "easier" ones will be encountered first. Thus, a build-up in tension in designed into the game, requiring only minimal set-up. There are unique mystery decks for each GOO, so that how you win the game differs every time. Sure, closing gates is still absolutely important - but it's incredibly satisfying to be drawn in so many different directions by EH's multitude of obstacles. Do you spend your turn building your character, killing monsters, closing gates, dealing with rumors, going on expeditions, or solving mysteries? Everything is useful, everything is different, and everything is fun.



------------------------------

So what are the missed opportunities here? Mind you, all of these are somewhat silly and a bit unfair, and that speaks to my overall feelings for EH at this time (very positive!).

1. Delayed vs. detained. Did we really need both of these? With quite different rules for each, when thematically they are near identical? Furthermore, I've of the belief that any rule in a game that says, "Sorry, you miss a turn" should be eliminated. A missed opportunity to trim and simplify.
2. Reckoning effects. I understand the importance of these - they allow the system to force important skill checks at unpredictable times, allowing for some clever push-your-luck decisions to emerge. BUT, they're the one system that is overly fiddly, in the sense of being easy to overlook/get wrong and slowing down gameplay significantly. Check for monster reckoning effects, GOO reckoning effects, rumor reckoning effects, condition reckoning effects, etc., etc. I wonder if they could have been tightened up a bit.
3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and 5-8 player games take way too long. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.
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Andrea Bellettini
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Hi!

Nice overview and i agree at all of your three positive points.

I will add a fourth point: another thing that i like a lot in this game is the "weight" of every single clue token. Most of the time when you get a clue is because you have solved some mistery or obstacle strictly related to the great old one and often you have travelled half the world to get that specific clue. Very satisfying just to get one, they are no more a simple way to re-roll dice.

Yes, this isn't a gateway game (glad for it!) but way more "user friendly" than AH, if i had an Italian edition i will gladly try to teach it to my wife!

Table time: i own AH since 2008 and i managed to put it on the table only 2 or 3 times; EH is on my games shelf by December 20, 2013 already played 5 times!

I love EH! Awesome game!


P.S.

Forgive me for my bad English.
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Andrea
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Being "a game for gamers" - in my view - is its biggest pros.
20 minutes of explanations is... nothing.

Casual gamers must extinguish. The sooner the better.
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Aaron Bedard
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severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.
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Andrea Bellettini
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RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the actual options available for each turn are pretty straight forward and easy to explain, I'll walk her through those and then just let her go and then explain my thinking when I take my turns and when it's time for an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the game together as we go through it.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


I think this is the best way to teach this game to a non-gamer.
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Delayed and detained are not thematically identical. If there's an accident or a severe weather event, you could be delayed. "Detained" means a person or group is holding you against your will. Both are needed in the same way that "Delayed" and "Arrested" are both needed in Arkham: different situations call for them thematically.
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Andrea Bellettini
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andymase wrote:


Casual gamers must extinguish. The sooner the better.


Or be assimilated and become hardcore gamers. Resistance is futile!sauron
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Daniel Honig
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kungfro wrote:
Delayed and detained are not thematically identical. If there's an accident or a severe weather event, you could be delayed. "Detained" means a person or group is holding you against your will. Both are needed in the same way that "Delayed" and "Arrested" are both needed in Arkham: different situations call for them thematically.


Agreed. The two are totally different - and mechanically also different. When your boat hits dense fog and is sent way off-course, you're delayed. When you get framed for a crime and jailed, you're detained. You can talk your way out of being detained if you can prove yourself innocent or slip some money into the right hands, but not much you can do about being delayed unless you're particularly good at getting around it.

Also, detained triggers Bad Things if you don't get out of jail, because this setting is sketchy as hell.
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Hassan Lopez
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kungfro wrote:
Delayed and detained are not thematically identical. If there's an accident or a severe weather event, you could be delayed. "Detained" means a person or group is holding you against your will. Both are needed in the same way that "Delayed" and "Arrested" are both needed in Arkham: different situations call for them thematically.


Ok, I'll give you different, but needed? I mean, you could have rules for investigators getting drunk, or seasick, or frostbite, or anything really - but every additional rule adds more overhead to the game, a steeper learning curve, and more look-backs at the rulebook once play has begun. I only say this was a missed opportunity because it appears the designers took a careful look at AH and tried to trim a lot of unnecessary fat.
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Frank Franco
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Why do you have to look in the rulebook? Detained is simply a condition card, you get the card out of the deck and read what you need to do.
As far as " getting drunk, or seasick, or frostbite, or anything really" they most certainly can, and probably will. I bet Ithwhatthefuck (the icy GOO) will include a frozen condition. Drunk would be an awesome one too, wish they did that.
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andymase wrote:
Being "a game for gamers" - in my view - is its biggest pros.
20 minutes of explanations is... nothing.

Casual gamers must extinguish. The sooner the better.


YES YES Yes
 
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Daniel Honig
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severian73 wrote:
Ok, I'll give you different, but needed? I mean, you could have rules for investigators getting drunk, or seasick, or frostbite, or anything really - but every additional rule adds more overhead to the game, a steeper learning curve, and more look-backs at the rulebook once play has begun. I only say this was a missed opportunity because it appears the designers took a careful look at AH and tried to trim a lot of unnecessary fat.


Detained is a condition though, so it adds no more overhead than any other condition (not much, since you just read the card and do what it says). The only thing confusing about Detained is the part where you can't do the same action twice so you only get to try and get out of jail once per turn.
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Jeremie Miller
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I can't imagine playing without the reckoning mechanic. Checking each place a reckoning can occur leads to a nasty Cascade of disaster that really builds the feeling of hopelessness for me. Plus it leads a large amount of the game play as you try to remove those effects.

I never played arkham so cannot compare but having the symbols activated by the mythos cards seems like a smooth mechanic that they can easily build upon over time.
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Xelto G
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severian73 wrote:
But what motivation was there to visit the Newspaper or Velma's Diner? Given that clues rarely appeared at these locations and you were never certain of a reward, you'd rarely waste a turn even with those wackos at the Lodge.

The newspaper was where you got money. It was probably the most visited location in our games.

But yeah, little reason to visit most other places for the encounter if it didn't come with clues as well.
 
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Richard
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Thanks for your review.

Interesting you put Reckoning in the cons. Alongside the double-sided cards, the reckoning is the biggest rule coup this game has. It's what allows the removal of Arkham's Upkeep Phase of Horribleness. By having effects that trigger for their upkeep, then we can remove having to do the upkeep every single round.

Even better, by making the triggers happen randomly, it makes for some very thematic and juicy game play holding on to conditions that you're not sure just when they will trigger. And, oh, the agony when you get that third reckoning mythos in a row which causes all that one monster to chase you continuously around the world until you are destroyed!

While the resolution of the effect is the most mechanical-burdening portion of the game, it's never complicated and I always enjoy watching what's usually soul-crushing developments in the world as they are resolved.
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Joel Eddy
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RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


I made a note to myself at work to come home and respond to this. But, I think this logic is very sound! Just give them the quick overview of what their character can do, and then discuss what the consequences will be based on their actions. What will happen to the doom track? What will happen if we leave that gate unattended etc...?

The only other thing I would recommend is to play with Azazoth and take out all of the hard omen cards. I think using only easy would actually be too easy, but maybe not.

Az's mysteries are a bit more straight forward than the rest of the guys.
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RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


My first full playthrough was me, my brother, and my roommate. None of us were board gamers, but my brother and I are gamers in general (video and wargames alike), so we took to it fairly quickly. I was surprised, however, that my roommate, who is not a gamer in any normal sense, also took to it fairly well. Of course, both my brother and my roommate were a bit confused by a lot of the smaller rules, but everything was simple enough that I could teach them while playing.

It seems to me EH is neither a gateway game nor a game for gamers, but maybe something in between. We still had tons of fun, and even ended up winning our first playthrough. What's important is that, so long as one person knows the rules very well and everyone is at least interested in learning to play, it's very easy to teach as you go along.

Neither my brother nor my roommate know the rules inside and out, yet both are eager to try playing again soon, which to me feels like a success.
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Hassan Lopez
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Coren wrote:
Thanks for your review.

Interesting you put Reckoning in the cons. Alongside the double-sided cards, the reckoning is the biggest rule coup this game has. It's what allows the removal of Arkham's Upkeep Phase of Horribleness. By having effects that trigger for their upkeep, then we can remove having to do the upkeep every single round.

Even better, by making the triggers happen randomly, it makes for some very thematic and juicy game play holding on to conditions that you're not sure just when they will trigger. And, oh, the agony when you get that third reckoning mythos in a row which causes all that one monster to chase you continuously around the world until you are destroyed!

While the resolution of the effect is the most mechanical-burdening portion of the game, it's never complicated and I always enjoy watching what's usually soul-crushing developments in the world as they are resolved.


Thanks for the comment, Richard. I was hesitant to put Reckoning effects under missed opportunities, since I absolutely agree they're a huge part of what makes EH tick and push the narrative forward. I think once I get a solid group of us who have several plays under our belt, they won't feel as awkward, we won't need to check the rules about the order in which they resolve, we'll know which monsters and GOOs have effects, etc. and it will all become smoother. I love the push your luck aspect to them and how they mesh with the conditions. Such a great game!
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Daniel Honig
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severian73 wrote:
I think once I get a solid group of us who have several plays under our belt, they won't feel as awkward, we won't need to check the rules about the order in which they resolve, we'll know which monsters and GOOs have effects, etc. and it will all become smoother. I love the push your luck aspect to them and how they mesh with the conditions. Such a great game!


Reckoning resolution order is actually really easy once you do it a few times:

- Look at the board and resolve every token that has a reckoning symbol printed on it (which is only monsters).
- Whether or not there are any cultists on the board, look over at the Old One sheet and resolve the reckonings there.
- Check the Mythos cards, which should be right next to the GOO.
- And lastly, players activate their reckoning effects.
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I'm going to echo a few others in regards to the reckoning effects. I think that they are really what MAKES EH over AH, as they add so much tension to the drawing of the Mythos cards. When you have a Dark Pact or one of the condition cards that could resolve on a reckoning, there is a lot riding on that red symbol popping up. My group really builds the tension and makes a dramatic event of flipping the Mythos card. I think it adds that much more flavor to the game.

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Daniel Honig
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On a side note, I'm wondering why rules explanation for this game is described as taking so long. I've seen it take a while, but rarely much more than 5 minutes. The script is basically as follows:

"This is Eldritch Horror, where you play as an investigator trying to save the world from a great evil lovecraftian menace of doom that is slowly waking up. That's the Old One over there ----> Your job is to find out critical information - by solving Mysteries - in order to prevent it from waking up and eating the world."

"The gameplay is simple: you have two parts to your turn. Part 1: you move, buy things, and generally explore the map. Part 2: things happen to you, depending on where you are. After everyone has gone, the Mythos phase starts and Bad Things Happen."

"So. For part 1 your Investigator is going to be on a spot. You get to do two different things on any given turn. The things you can pick from are: move to a connected spot (demonstrate moving a guy), buying a ticket if you're in a city which you can use to move further next time, buying stuff in a city with no monsters, trading stuff, or healing. Also, you might get extra things from your gear and your sheet.

Buying stuff involves a test, which will be used a lot. To do a test, roll some dice - if any show a 5 or a 6, you pass. The number of dice you roll is equal to your level of the stat tested. For buying stuff, it's influence.

"Stuff" involves assets, but you can also get spells, artifacts, and clues - you cast spells, use artifacts in combat or on the map, and spend clues to solve mysteries or other bad things. All of these are tradeable.

Healing is easy, too. You start with health and sanity. When you heal - which you can do anywhere as long as there's no monster there - you take 1 health and one sanity that you've lost and put it back on your sheet.


After we've all finished that, you get to encounter things. If there are no monsters you can try to grab a clue, do something in a city - and note that major cities will say what probably happens to you, like so - or have a generic encounter wherever. If you're on a gate, which is a Bad Thing that spawns monsters and makes the Old One wake up faster, you can try to close it. But! If there are monsters on your spot you've got to fight them first. All of them. Basically, you test your will against their horror for mental damage, and then flail at them with your strength vs their damage. Your successes reduce their damage, and however many you get on the strength test is how much damage you do them. That's it. That's their health over there.

If you've wiped out all the monsters you get the chance to do something else if you want. If not, you're done.

Lastly, crazy shit happens. This reference guide has a list on the back, but either the omen spins which moves up doom and makes the old one wake up faster, monsters or clues spawn, gates spawn, or a reckoning happens - where all of the Bad Things happen to everyone. There will be a red symbol.


That takes five, maaaaaaybe ten minutes to go through. The first turn will be slow, but afterwards everyone can generally jump right in. The game is extremely simple on a conceptual level, just a challenging game to win. I think the main issue is that there is a lot of -stuff- going on, and it's tempting to frontload everything under the sun. Many of the rules can be explained as people are taking that first turn, particularly the encounter step. And the Mythos Card/anything to do with the GOO should be handled by someone who knows what they're doing.
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Tahsin Shamma
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Glaurung2 wrote:
andymase wrote:
Being "a game for gamers" - in my view - is its biggest pros.
20 minutes of explanations is... nothing.

Casual gamers must extinguish. The sooner the better.


YES YES Yes


Why all the casual gamer hate? Everyone was a casual gamer once.

As far as I'm concerned, Cthulhu is not a theme for anything "casual" or "gateway". The concepts and story arcs in any good Mythos story don't lend well to casual games anyway. It will only flatten the theme and make it softer, which I believe detracts from the absolute horror present in the fiction.

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RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


Shouldn't you take her out for dinner, instead? whistle
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andymase wrote:
RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


Shouldn't you take her out for dinner, instead? whistle


Ha!

The deal has been I do all that stuff with her during the day, shopping, dinner, showing her around Boston and then at night we play a boardgame. Tonight, after an afternoon of tooling around the city for 5 hours in 16 degree weather, she says, what game are we going to play tonight?. She's a cool girl, gladly watched football every weekend she's been here, we've been to two Celtics games, and now she's asking me what boardgame we're going to play.. She returns to Australia on Thursday, I'll be a little sad to see her go.
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Ben E
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RawDealDemo wrote:
andymase wrote:
RawDealDemo wrote:
severian73 wrote:

3. Still not a gateway game. This is my own personal beef here, and it's an unfair one, I admit. When EH was announced, I was really hoping it could be the thematic gateway game I would pull out when 5 or 6 friends wanted to try this whole "board game thing." The beautiful components and narrative backdrop would draw them in, and the growing personal relationship with their character would keep them immersed. But EH is still a game for gamers. Rules explanation takes 20-30 minutes, and that just won't cut it for so many "casual" gamers. As such, like AH, it won't get as much table-time as it deserves in my household.



I'm going to attempt to teach this to an absolute non-gamer this evening.
She's been a real champ and has learned and played three games of Letters from Whitechapel and one game of Sentinels of the Multiverse with me in the last week.

EH is certainly a bigger game and going to be overwhelming to her out of the box. My plan of attack is not to give her the 20-30 minute rules overview. I think I'm going to explain to her the general situation - we are trying to save the world by uncovering 3 mysteries surrounding this ancient evil that is slowly awakening.

I feel like the options available for each turn are few and straight forward enough where I can easily walk her through them and then just let her go explore the map in any way she feel like. On my turns I'll try to keep us somewhat on task, handle the Mythos Phase as simply as possible and then when it's time for her to have an encounter or a battle I'll simply explain what's happening, what her dice rolls mean and sort of let her put the big picture together as we go through the game.

Not gonna worry about how strategically sound her choices are or winning or losing. I'll just give her as much story and theme as is available, hope she gets yanked into the world and we'll see where we land.

Wish us luck.


Shouldn't you take her out for dinner, instead? whistle


Ha!

The deal has been I do all that stuff with her during the day, shopping, dinner, showing her around Boston and then at night we play a boardgame. Tonight, after an afternoon of tooling around the city for 5 hours in 16 degree weather, she says, what game are we going to play tonight?. She's a cool girl, gladly watched football every weekend she's been here, we've been to two Celtics games, and now she's asking me what boardgame we're going to play.. She returns to Australia on Thursday, I'll be a little sad to see her go.


Erm follow her back to OZ dude you found a keeper.
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