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Subject: Best price point for POD cards rss

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William Mitchell

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This is a question about a print-n-play game using cards.

I'd like to offer pre-printed cards via DriveThruCards.com, but I'm unsure at what price point I should offer them due to the sheer number of cards.

There are a total of 277 cards in the game: 164 enemy cards, 75 ability cards, 6 Hero stat cards, and 32 loot cards. Even with a small markup (around 20%), it would cost $29.99! Does that sound like a price point that people would actually be willing to pay?

Alternatively, I could split the decks into two: 164 card Enemy deck and a 113 card Hero (and everything else) deck for $16.99 and $11.52 respectively (incl. markup). That way people could buy some of the cards pre-printed and perhaps print the rest themselves.

Just not sure what's more attractive to potential buyers: a lump sum for everything or two smaller sums. Any feedback from you guys would be great!
 
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Rohan
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...the grey rain-curtain turned all to silver glass and was rolled back, and he beheld white shores and beyond them a far green country under a swift sunrise.
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I've done other PNPs where I print the cards (arts cow and printerstudio thus far), and while I've never ordered that many cards, if I liked the game, I'd be ok with $30 as that's similar to what I'd pay for a regular game of similar size.
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William Mitchell

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Thank you, Dave. So would you advice against breaking the deck up into smaller, less expensive decks?
 
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Rohan
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For me, I would find that annoying (like I'm getting nickel and dimed), for others I can't say.
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Matt Pierce
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200+ cards is a lot of cards. A pokemon starter deck runs for about $13 and thats only 60. I think $30 for a big-ass set isn't unreasonable, but if you can split it up into smaller purchases it's less risk for an unsure buyer. As long as the smaller packs work standalone at least.
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William Mitchell

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Unfortunately, theydon't stand alone. Keep in mind that the cards come with the rulebook itself, so buyers always have the option to print them themselves (some or all of them). That's why I was thinking about breaking the printed cards up so buyers could have the option of only printing some themselves and buying the pre-printed for the rest. I honestly don't know what buyers would prefer.

As a side note, the game also includes dungeon tiles (in 3 different styles/themes). Those come unprinted, but I was thinking about selling them pre-printed as well, but in 3 separate sets. That would allow people interested in the dungeon tiles (and not the game) to buy them as needed.

Basically, I want to give people options, but I'm worried it might be become too confusing...
 
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Steve Zagieboylo
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I published Jelly Bean Farmers on DriveThruCards this past summer. My deck is 120 cards, for $19.99, and I have offered discounts of up to $5 through the promotional tools on the site. Sales have been disappointing, but that could be because the game is no good, my artwork is sub-par, or my ability to write marketing jargon is non-existent. Or maybe it's because $19.99 (or $14.99) is more than people want to spend on an unknown publisher.

In your case, the hill is that much steeper. I would suggest that if you have a significant number of cards spent on instructions, then just remove those and offer the instructions as a free download. DriveThruCards supports this approach quite well. For my game, I have 2 cards which are part of the tableau that the players build (that is, two per player, so 8 cards spent on that). One of those two has the Game Sequence as a bullet list on the back as a quick reference.

I do agree with the earlier poster that I would not want you to split it into separate decks unless at least one of them is independently playable. I don't see a serious use of self-printing for cards, because most people just don't have access to printing for the quality that you need for cards.

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William Mitchell

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Zag24 wrote:
Sales have been disappointing, but that could be because the game is no good, my artwork is sub-par, or my ability to write marketing jargon is non-existent.


(This quote makes me want to have your baby. )

But seriously, the cards are used to keep track of abilities and attributes (see here).

I will probably go with the whole deck as one. I'm not sure it'll make much difference either way (see quote above)...
 
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Matthew Hanson

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I know I'd want the base game to be complete instead of needing to buy it in two pieces.

I haven't sold cards at Drive Thru, but I do sell RPG books both as pdf and POD. In my experience the .pds sell WAY more copies, by at least a factor of ten.
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