Itai Rosenbaum
Israel
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sunrise.

The fields are quiet this early in the morning, every once in a while you see a shadow move between the trees, inspecting, guarding. Food is scarce, so we must guard our farms well from those who would take what is not theirs. My back still aches from yesterday’s labor. Hours upon hours amidst the rows of trees. Carrying the bushels back to be stored. Today I am rewarded, away from the sun, deep in the cool underground - digging. They say, once the dig is complete, our burden will be lifted. We will power the great machines that stand derelict in the fields. So we dig on, towards the golden walls. At the mouth of the tunnel I relieve a man; we exchange some words, and he’s off. I grab a shovel, and start to dig.


- - - - - -

Euphoria is a game of control. Control your workers, control your opponents, and, eventually, control the world. The player (anywhere between two and six) will be racing to place authority tokens across the board in order to be the one true ruler of the shattered remains of humanity. The first player to be rid of all ten of his or her authority tokens will either lead the world into a brighter tomorrow, or crush the opposition under their heel.

You will achieve this goal using a handful of workers, two trusted advisors and your own cunning senses. Each player begins the game with two out of his four workers, represented by dice. The pips on the dice represent the worker’s knowledge - how much they know about their grim reality. A worker kept in the dark will believe the word of Big Brother, continuing to go about their assigned tasks without asking too many questions. Let your workers learn too much about the world around them, and they might realize the true face of the oppressive regime that runs their lives and run away. At the beginning of the game, and any time you retrieve your workers from your board back to your “HQ” you roll your workers and total their collective sum, adding your knowledge modifier - if the total is equal to or greater than 16, you lose the worker with the highest knowledge. Such is the danger of allowing them to talk among themselves and share the things they’ve seen with each other. Additionally, each player will start the game with two recruits, either by drafting or selecting out of a random draw of 4. These recruits will provide you with various unique bonuses as well as define your initial allegiance to one of Euphoria’s 4 factions. One is placed faced up, and is your active recruit, while the second is placed face down and is hidden.

The game’s board is divided into these 4 factions: The Euphorians, a high-cultured elite, the Subterrans, the reclusive tinkerers living underground, the Wastelanders, unfortunate farmers living out in the wilderness and the Icarites, wealthy traders flying above the troubled world. The three land-based factions have a similar layout, with a resource generator, a tunnel, and 3 markets (one pre-built artifact market, and two yet-to-be-constructed ones), while the Icarites forgo a tunnel in lieu of 3 prebuilt markets. On their turn players will either place a worker, or retrieve any or all of their workers back to their HQ (rolling and checking the knowledge of all retrieved workers).

- - - - - -

Mid-day.

The canopy blocks out the worst of it, but it is still bloody hot out here. We’ve received the amended blueprints, and construction is moving along briskly. If only they’d move a little faster, I could get out of this god forsaken heat. The bright metal and glass of the buildings around me merely bounce the sun rays off one another, and they seem to center on this square. We’ve torn down the old building, cleared out the musty books. Held a nice bonfire last night. The new center will be a shining beacon to our progress. The committee is all assembled here, and we’re overseeing the progress to make sure nothing is missed. We shout down to the labourers, issue commands. They barely hear us over the hum of the generators. I glance at the blueprints again, and notice a beam that should be relocated. The fools, can’t follow simple directions. I straighten my jacket, and head down the ramp towards the construction site.


- - - - - -

While it may seem like there are many places to place your workers, it boils down to few choices that are repeated are across the board. The resource generators provide you with the relevant commodity (electricity in Euphoria, water in Subterra, peaches in the Wasteland and bliss in Icarus) and may manipulate your knowledge or the relevant faction’s allegiance track - depending on the total number of knowledge in that space. The allegiance track signifies the prizes the different factions bestow upon those that have sworn allegiance to them (i.e. have an active recruit belonging to that faction). The tunnels use the commodity gained to dig towards one of the opposing factions. Digging unearths precious resources (gold in the Euphorian tunnel, stone in the Subterran one and clay in the Wasteland) or a rare artifact from a bygone era. Should players show their dedication to the faction by helping their tunnel dig further, they’ll get the opportunity to reveal any hidden recruits of the relevant faction. Once the tunnel is complete, the faction gains access to their rival’s resources, at a much better rate. However, only the loyal may reap this reward, and a player must have an active recruit belonging to that faction to use this space. Finally, the resources gathered from digging may spent to construct grand markets. Once a certain number of spaces on the market have been filled (determined by the number of players), the market is constructed and each player who took part in its construction places on of their authority tokens on it. Woe be it to those who failed to participate in the construction. The elite do not look kindly on those who shake responsibility and impose a harsh penalty on those who do not participate in the construction of a market. The markets then allow you to begin to take control of the territory, and place your authority tokens in it. Thus the cycle is complete. Commodities are needed to dig tunnels, which provide the resources needed to construct the markets which, in turn, allow you to grow your authority in the region.

Throwing a wrench in the works are the pesky Icarites, who float above the world. These sky traders buy and trade at exuberant rates, hoping to gain a profit from the others’ desires. The Icarites contain 3 pre-built markets which allow players to trade resources and commodities for artifacts, authority and the other resources they need to prosper on the ground below. Finally, the Worker Activation Tank allows players to increase their worker force by either lobotomising citizens into submission, or coaxing them with a hot shower and the promise of greatness. Most of the spaces on the map (the tunnels, markets and Worker Activation Tank) are “bump” spaces. A player may place a worker here and if the space already contains another worker (his own or belonging to someone else), the previous worker is bumped back to its owner’s HQ. Thus the players place, bump and retrieve workers, gaining resources and commodities, constructing markets and placing authority tokens until one player has placed all ten of his tokens and is declared the winner.

- - - - - -

Sunset.

The clouds seem to take a greenish hue. It is our fleet, nestled between them, but they seem to be made of the bliss we brew deep within our labs. Euphoria’s glinting spires catch the last rays in the distance, while below us the Wasteland grows ripe. We will visit them tomorrow. Offering our wares and our unique verdant smoke. They all want it, and only we provide it. It is how we remain prosperous and how we maintain our comfortable lives outside the gleaming city. We are not like the rats that scurry underground, not like the beast of burden working the field and we are not the mice, running in place in their little wheels. We go where we please, above it all. Looking down provides a nice perspective. I’ve read in a book about a little girl who travelled in a balloon much resembling our dirigibles to a far away land. We have that privilege here, books. The mice would burn them. The beasts would not know what to do with them. The rats… god knows what the rats would do the books; take them apart and use them for scraps, most like. We talk of leaving, of flying away to a place where bounty is plentiful. But we must amass just a little more fortune, gather a few more necessities. I hear they may have uncovered a game in one of the tunnels. I so very much want to play.


- - - - - -

As a worker placement game, Euphoria seems to be missing one of the key features of most worker placements - action denial. How, if one cannot deny a certain action space (construction sites notwithstanding), can one impact the decisions of other players? Where is the player interaction? I believe that because of the lack of action denial, player interaction is increased in Euphoria. The bump spaces provide so many opportunities to mess with other players. Do you bump your friend’s worker, saving them a turn? Or do you wait until they must retrieve and free up the space? Do you park your worker in a spot knowing others will need it, saving you the retrieval action? You can wait until one of your opponent rolled a high knowledge, and then bump their workers, causing them to possibly lose the worker. Additionally, the allegiance track provide an extra layer of interaction. A 5 player game where the recruits are spread out evenly amongst the players will play radically differently from a game where 3 out of the 5 being with a Subterran recruit. And then will one of the non-Subterran players place a worker with a knowledge of 5 in the Aquifer, preventing the advancement of the Subterran allegiance track? The choices are endless.

In this way, Euphoria is much less straight-forward than your standard worker placement game. In fact, the first time player, on their first turn will usually stare at the board - stumped as to what their best course of action will be. The options are limitless and there is no clear path to victory. Once they get going, it becomes clearer. I’ve seen absolute non-gamers (meaning - Euphoria was their first board game experience) grasp the game within a few turns. It just clicks. You understand the cycle, the causality of it all and the importance of timing. Placing a worker at the right place at the exact right time is crucial. A mis-step may leave you without workers in hand on a turn where a market is about to close up. Being left out of a market construction can be an incredible set back as the penalties are harsh. They’re largely situational, and a certain penalty can be an acceptable loss, but one never knows this until after the market is constructed. So choosing not to participate is a huge risk. Not being able to participate is worse, and there will always be someone left out (unless you’re playing a 2-player game, in which, hypothetically, every player has the opportunity to participate in the market construction).

Furthermore, Euphoria is a tense game. It is a race, and an unrelenting one. When playing it would seem at first that the game will last a long time. Initially the Authority tokens don’t come out, perhaps one here, one there. Then, from nowhere, they will pop out one after the other. Player after player losing one, two maybe even three stars in one turn. The allegiance tracks near the end, territories are closing up, markets are being constructed. Before you know it, you’ve gone from 7 stars in hand to a single one. So have three other players and it’s down to who will place that last star. You could complete the Euphorian allegiance track, but that would grant a point to your opponent as well, and we don’t want a tie, do we? So the market, then? But do you have the resources? You will next turn. Now just to make it that far. Every game of Euphoria I’ve had, the endgame was a tense nail biter, and with one exception, it always came down to a one point difference, usually between more than one player. The post-game discussion is always “I just needed one more turn…”

Finally, the game is dripping with theme. Perhaps it’s just my play group, but the table talk is not about mechanics, but thematics. We don’t discuss game terms, we discuss the actions they symbolize. It really feels like we’re sending our workforce out, and then bring them home without a warm meal to welcome them. We do not pay three electricity to recruit a new worker, we lobotomize them. We do not have a low knowledge and high morale - rather our workforce is dumb and happy. For me, once I hear people use these types of phrases to describe in game action, I know I’m well immersed in the world of the game.

- - - - - -

Darkness.

We no longer know the time, or even where we are on the day cycle. Has the moon risen? Is the sun shining? Rain? Time stands still here, below. Torches burn at regularly places intervals, but they provide more shadow than light. Our gloomy caverns flicker around us, constantly moving and shifting. Would we be able to find the way out if we wanted to? Perhaps they keep it dark to confuse us, to keep us disoriented. Under my bed, it’s still there. Found it in the tunnels. A long wooden shaft, thin on one end, thick on the other. We can use this. Do some real damage. It must be quick and it must be decisive. This could be the end of us, or it could be the new beginning. Do we continue as before, toil and tinker, hoping to one day crawl out of the darkness - or do we take our future into our own hands? Fight our way out into the light?


- - - - - -

There are few chinks in Euphoria’s armor, and they take a little away from an overall great game. First and foremost is the luck factor. It is not as heavy as in games like Arkham Horror where success and failure depend on a roll of the dice, but that is not to say that there is no luck in the game. The dice themselves, obviously, provide a semblance of luck. I’ve seen a player lose a worker when rolling only two dice, while also seeing a player constantly retain every one in a 4-worker retrieval. The doubles rule (you may place all workers showing the same number in a single turn) can also swing the game in one player’s favour. It’s comes with the territory of dice, naturally, but players who hate any and all luck factors in their games may find this irritating. A more fixable instance of luck in the game comes in the recruits. They are drawn randomly at the beginning of the game, and players choose two out of the four they are given. It is possible that one player will get a couple of recruits that not only provide a good synergy between each other, but all the other players will get stuck with less than optimal combinations. Furthermore, some recruits are simply better than others. They are more or less balanced, and the recruits that provide you with a greater bonus usually require a greater cost, but the fact remains that a recruit that provides you with an extra star at a cost of two artifacts is simply better than a recruit which provides you with a bonus commodity if your worker is alone. The easy fix for this is to begin drafting your recruits. After your first few games, once you feel comfortable with it, forgo the random draw and use the variant provided in the rulebook. It mitigates the luck factor and allows you to plan and choose your recruits in a more informed manner.

My chief issue with the game, and what I believed is the single biggest missed opportunity, comes in the moral dilemma cards. Each player receives one of these at the beginning of the game, and they provide him with a choice. For the cost of a single, specific artifact or two non-specific ones, the player may either immediately place one of his authority tokens on the card, or draw two recruits out of the deck and pick one. This is largely situational, but nines times out of ten, I’ve seen people pick the recruit. It’s delayed gratification at its finest - an authority token now, or a bonus and possible authority token later. However, there is no real difference between these cards (other than which artifact is required). They don’t feel like the moral dilemma they claim to be. There’s no real choice here, and no ramifications. There is no price to pay, really. Receiving two artifacts is really not that complicated, and the reward, in most cases, will be the same. I believe more could be done with these cards, perhaps add another level of interaction. Work the story of the game more into these cards - do you help the faceless government, and hamper your opponents, or do you strike out on your own, receive a penalty but at a great reward. There is plenty to play around with, and these cards usually end up being played without any flare or fanfare.

These qualms aside, I still believe Euphoria is a fantastic game. It is quickly climbing to the top of my list, and I will be playing it for years to come. In the short time I’ve had it, I’ve played many games and each provided a fun, enjoyable and different experience. I highly recommend it and encourage any and all types of gamers to give it a try, because I’ve yet to see someone who hasn’t enjoyed it. Hell, even my father, who’s not a gamer in the least, agreed to give it a try (after much coaxing), and ended up enjoying the game. And if that’s not a vote of confidence, I really don’t know what is.
38 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Justin R
United States
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review, man. Still have not been able to get a game together...very busy over the holidays, then at work for the last few weeks (and the next few). But I'm sure I'll love it too.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jamey Stegmaier
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Itai--I really, really enjoyed reading this. Similar to Rahdo's video review earlier today, you do a great job of infusing the theme with the overview and review.

I agree with you that the ethical dilemma cards are a missed opportunity. I'm at peace with what they are because they certainly don't ruin the game in any way--it's just that they could be a lot more thematic and interesting. Although I didn't design Euphoria as a game that would have any expansions, if we create an expansion for it (and I recently had an idea for one), I would definitely like to address the ethical dilemmas and try to do something more interesting with them.

Thanks for taking the time to play and write about Euphoria, and I hope you enjoy subsequent plays!
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jacob Gunness
Denmark
Copenhagen
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Terrific review, and my experiences pretty much mirror yours. Great - and quite thematic - game with lots of replayability value. And it works really well with non-gamers as well.

Jamey,
until the expansion arrives (which I am confident it will!), if you have any suggestions for adapting the dilemma cards into something a little more decisive....?
Maybe a variant where the cost of playing the card is increased or the rewards for supporting/fighting the system are differentiated to a larger degree? I'm sure I can come up with a house rule, but as you have a better overview of the game balance, your suggestion is probably going to be better than mine
Of course, any such rule(s) would potentially overrule the text printed on the dilemma cards, but I'm sure we could manage that.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O P
msg tools
mb
Great review!

I'm one of the players that played with Itay and although I pretty much agree with the overall review I'd like to add two problems I have with the game:

1) I dislike the doubles mechanic which lets you place more than 1 worker if you get 2+ of the same number on the cube. It's very luck based and I believe that it can sometimes win games that were otherwise close and good games.

2) Two of the recruits in my opinion are too strong. Sorry for not remembering the names, but it's the two that give you the option to get 2 stars in a single turn. In the games that we played I feel that whoever got those recruits won the game almost solely due to getting them, which again, depends on luck.

So as you can see, I really dislike luck based mechanics in competitive games. I wouldn't mind this at all if Euphoria was a short game that you could have hundreds of games of, which would mean that the luck would eventually even out (or if it was a co-op). However, seeing as the game is actually quite long, luck will definitely not even out in the number of games that I'll end up playing this, and losing a long competitive(!) game due to being unlucky really sucks.

I know that some people really like that element of luck in their games so they can get their exciting come backs or whatever, but in my opinion, luck totally destroys competitive games. You should be rewarded with a win if you're skillful, not lucky. Unfortunately in Euphoria, as long as all players pretty much knows what they're doing, the luckiest player will always win.

To fix this, next time we will play, I will suggest removing the 2 strong recruits and removing the doubles rule so that you will not be able to place more than 1 worker a turn no matter what. I feel that losing a worker due to knowledge test and getting a low number on the dice is luck based enough to make the game feel more exciting to those who need it and still not make the game entirely luck based.

I know this post sounds a bit harsh and some people might not agree with me, but overall I really liked the game and hope to play more of it. It's just that I don't feel like investing 2 hours on a competitive game that will be decided by luck.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark O'Reilly
United Kingdom
Chester
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Nice review.
To address the post by op (the great old one) above.
The luck factor.
There is luck in this game, I think everyone knows there will be a degree of luck in a game where dice are involved - but concern raised about playing a two hour game ( was 6 player? ) with maybe some new players to start ?, and too much luck , so even if you play well, you may lose to an inferior player?.

I think if you are all adult super competitive gamers around the table, luck can be minimal if you remove (as a group decision),the cards you see as overpowered ( no game breaker)
And possibly house rule no doubles rule, or not allow two doubles in a row to be used.

Now... For a family game, I love the added luck factor, it makes the game super fun!, it allows my children to have a fighting chance!.
Think of it this way - if there is zero luck in a "game" - the most intelligent person at the table is going to win the game, pretty much all of the time ( like a good chess player) .
That is not a game I want to play, even in terra mystica there can be a lucky break..someone could block you in..but didn't, someone didn't take the power action you want - lucky you, or they did - unlucky you.
Same with Agricola, your card hand works amazing in one game and gets your food engine or whatever going perfectly, in another it just doesn't happen .
Without some luck in a game - well it pretty much does come down to who has the higher IQ, certainly after a few plays and all understand the game entirely.
I just want to point out that "luck" in a game is not a dirty word, it's not a bad thing IMHO it's a good thing, you still have to use gaming skill to secure a victory.
I play for the game, not for the win, winning is a joyful bonus!.
I think Euphoria shines due to having a dollop of luck thrown in, anyone can win it - not just the hardened gamer.
This game is the real deal - it's why I "game".
6 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
O P
msg tools
mb
biffta wrote:
Nice review.
To address the post by op (the great old one) above.
The luck factor.
There is luck in this game, I think everyone knows there will be a degree of luck in a game where dice are involved - but concern raised about playing a two hour game ( was 6 player? ) with maybe some new players to start ?, and too much luck , so even if you play well, you may lose to an inferior player?.

I think if you are all adult super competitive gamers around the table, luck can be minimal if you remove (as a group decision),the cards you see as overpowered ( no game breaker)
And possibly house rule no doubles rule, or not allow two doubles in a row to be used.

Now... For a family game, I love the added luck factor, it makes the game super fun!, it allows my children to have a fighting chance!.
Think of it this way - if there is zero luck in a "game" - the most intelligent person at the table is going to win the game, pretty much all of the time ( like a good chess player) .
That is not a game I want to play, even in terra mystica there can be a lucky break..someone could block you in..but didn't, someone didn't take the power action you want - lucky you, or they did - unlucky you.
Same with Agricola, your card hand works amazing in one game and gets your food engine or whatever going perfectly, in another it just doesn't happen .
Without some luck in a game - well it pretty much does come down to who has the higher IQ, certainly after a few plays and all understand the game entirely.
I just want to point out that "luck" in a game is not a dirty word, it's not a bad thing IMHO it's a good thing, you still have to use gaming skill to secure a victory.
I play for the game, not for the win, winning is a joyful bonus!.
I think Euphoria shines due to having a dollop of luck thrown in, anyone can win it - not just the hardened gamer.
This game is the real deal - it's why I "game".


The game was indeed 6 players who most of us were new. I guess it can be quicker than 2 hours, but definitely not quick enough to allow hundreds or thousands of games played.

I totally agree with you though, most of our group are super competitive people and we play to win. For casuals, this game is perfect. That's why I prefer games like 7 Wonders or Puerto Rico in which the most skilled player will almost always win. It's different schools of thought though, and although I said that I dislike some of it, I would not change the game. I would however like to use some house rules in order to make it more fitting to our group.

Also I just wanted to point out the luck point just in case some groups out there are like ours so they will know what they're getting into.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark O'Reilly
United Kingdom
Chester
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Hey great old one ( sorry don't know your name), I totally get your point also .
For your group , removing the two cards you see as overpowered and a doubles house rule sounds like an easy solution to minimise luck factor.

Thanks for chiming back in on my comment
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Itai Rosenbaum
Israel
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I completely understand GreatOldOne's claims as during the game in question, one player got EXTREMELY lucky:
1. He started the game with the Gambler and the recruit which allows him to sacrifice two artifacts to place an extra star in a territory.
2. Only once did he not snag a pair of artifacts with the Gambler's ability.
3. He consistently rolled doubles, nearly every turn, and even managed a few triples.

All these things combined led to a game in which one player win with everyone else no where close to winning (with 5-7 stars still I'm hand).

Now, I realize this is an extreme case and the likelihood of this happening in one game (and to a single player, no less) is tiny - but it still happened, and that game was won almost purely on luck.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Smith
United Kingdom
Solihull
West Midlands
flag msg tools
http://www.youtube.com/user/SmoothCJS
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
IronSyndicate wrote:
3. He consistently rolled doubles, nearly every turn, and even managed a few triples.


Give the 'costs morality to place doubles' variant idea a shot. Placing additional workers from doubles costs you 1 on the Moral track, and is only possible if you have the morality to pay.

Edit: Didn't realize my post sounds like I'm reiterating my own idea! I'm not, I just wasn't sure who suggested it and was bringing it up as it sounds like a great variant. Have fun =)
5 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jason Speicher
United States
Potomac Falls
VIRGINIA
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
jameystegmaier wrote:
Itai--I really, really enjoyed reading this. Similar to Rahdo's video review earlier today, you do a great job of infusing the theme with the overview and review.

I agree with you that the ethical dilemma cards are a missed opportunity. I'm at peace with what they are because they certainly don't ruin the game in any way--it's just that they could be a lot more thematic and interesting. Although I didn't design Euphoria as a game that would have any expansions, if we create an expansion for it (and I recently had an idea for one), I would definitely like to address the ethical dilemmas and try to do something more interesting with them.

Thanks for taking the time to play and write about Euphoria, and I hope you enjoy subsequent plays!


Jamey having additional markets to provide different situations with the markets would be an idea for the expansion, as well as doing more with the dilemma
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark O'Reilly
United Kingdom
Chester
Cheshire
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jason, there are already 18 market tiles and 6 are only ever used per game
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Benjamin Lindvall
United States
Bismarck
North Dakota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Smoothsmith wrote:
IronSyndicate wrote:
3. He consistently rolled doubles, nearly every turn, and even managed a few triples.


Give the 'costs morality to place doubles' variant idea a shot. Placing additional workers from doubles costs you 1 on the Moral track, and is only possible if you have the morality to pay.


I recently played a game this way, and found it to be a significant improvement.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jamey Stegmaier
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks for your thoughts! OP, I think there's a difference between "luck" and "push your luck" (Euphoria falls into the latter category), but if you definitely come to the conclusion that you don't like the fun of the doubles rule, I like Chris' suggestion (I think it was originally created by Benjamin): "If you roll doubles or triples (or quadruples!), if you want to place more than one of those workers on the same turn, you have to lose 1 morale for each one of them before you place it."
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Itai Rosenbaum
Israel
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
someotherguy wrote:
The "brain scale" doesn't actually make your little dice workers smarter, either,


Actually - it does.

Higher knowledge on the dice means more resources as you can grab the 9+ spot, meaning the workers are more efficient. And knowledge begets knowledge - so you go up even higher on the scale.

And no one called Euphoria a "Push Your Luck" game. The specific dice element was described as having more of a "push your luck" quality than pure luck.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.