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Sekigahara: The Unification of Japan» Forums » General

Subject: solitaire variants? rss

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Bob Long
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Ok, this is a great game i've heard. its also a block game, so

anyone tried to play this solitaire?

if so, how did it work?

I've played reg chit and counter war games solitaire, can't see how this could be much different. just use the old imagination.

comments greatly appreciated.

even those I may not agree with

so heave ho
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Warren Davis
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Sekigahara isn't good for solitaire as between two experienced players (& they don't have to be that experienced) bluffing is critical.

You shouldn't have much trouble getting opponents, though.
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Phil Shepherd
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buseyhead wrote:
Ok, this is a great game i've heard. its also a block game, so

anyone tried to play this solitaire?

if so, how did it work?

I've played reg chit and counter war games solitaire, can't see how this could be much different. just use the old imagination.

comments greatly appreciated.

even those I may not agree with

so heave ho


If only there were somebody fairly close to Woodbridge who already owned Sekigahara and wanted an oppenent...whistle
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Jim O'Neill (Established 1949)
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buseyhead wrote:
...can't see how this could be much different. just use the old imagination.

The biggest thorn in the side of solo-players is the Loyalty Challenge card; so much so that I play without them when I play solo.

Regards,


Jim

Est. 1949

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Jeffrey Smith
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Just got the game a couple of weeks ago and while the game is obviously better against another player I was pleasantly surprised at just how well you can solo this one. My method has become:
1. Remove the Loyalty Challenge cards from both decks.
2. Keep blocks facing away.
3. Only look at blocks of phasing "player"
4. In combat, attacker plays all attack cards he wishes to play before defender plays cards.
5. After both sides have drawn their hands, randomly draw a card from each hand to determine who goes first.

I find that between the difficulty (at least for me) in remembering the composition of stacks of blocks and the randomness of the cards, battles are often a tense affair.

One other thing I've just started experimenting with is a way to add back the tension of the Loyalty Challenge. Whenever I play a card to deploy a unit, if it is the last of its kind in my hand I roll a D10. On a roll of 1 the army just played defects to the other side. I've only played this way once so far and it seemed that units very rarely defected, certainly less often than in true two-player games I've played. I may change to a D6 and see how that goes.

For a game that has been often compared to poker, and the Solitaire suitability rating of 1 that appears on the back of the box, I think this game provides a very good solo experience for those who are used to playing both sides of a game.

Now if only I could find a satisfying way to play Napoleon's Triumph solitaire!

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Jeffrey Smith
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Just as an update, I've played two more solo games using a D6 to check for loyalty. As I mentioned above, first the attacker plays as many cards as he wishes to play. If at any time the attacker plays the last card of a given mon from his hand, roll a D6. On a roll of 1 the unit just played fails its loyalty check and defects to the other side. Once all of the attacker's cards have been played, the defender plays as many cards as he wishes. Once again, if the defender plays the last card of a given mon, roll for a loyalty check as before.

Although a 1 in 6 chance is a bit higher than the odds of a loyalty check using the actual cards, in the two games I played I only had units defect maybe 3 or 4 times per game. I find it adds a little extra drama to a solo game, and helps maintain the character of the game a bit more than simply playing without the loyalty cards.
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