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Crowdfunding: Kickstarter» Forums » General

Subject: Kickstarter, what can a game designer get away with? rss

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Edwin Twentier
United States
West Virginia
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What exactly is alright to add on to a kickstarter project?
Is it alright to add an addon that has nothing to do with the actual game?

Here is a direct quote from the designer of a board game in response to me calling him out on overpriced addons.

"The tins and play mats aren't even for the board game at all (this is alot of what you were pointing out). These are for our (CCG that shall remain nameless) fans that want more CCG content."

These are "Kickstarter Exclusives" that are only being offered (theoretically anyway) through the campaign.

Fans of the game are saying that this is a common thing, addons that have little to do with the actual game/project.

I admit, my views of kickstarter are not good, I don't believe that companies should use it strictly to sell games that aren't done; and I don't believe that larger companies should use it at all. I just want some opinions from people who aren't necessarily fans of the game in question.

If anyone wants the thread that this started in, I'll send it, but I'd like some anonymous input first.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Liam
Scotland
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Moved from BoardGameGeek Community to Kickstarter.

Unrelated addons would never be for me. But if they are just addons then what's the harm (note the contraction with my next paragraph). Higher cost may be because they simply don't think there will be that much demand thus a smaller (expensive) production run is required.

Unrelated rewards or unrelated fluff built into the package... now that would drive me nuts. Watching someone wasting their time and to some degree my money on providing, frankly, CO2 generating crap which may prove to be a distraction from them getting everything else correct.... Grrrr.
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Jacq L
New Zealand
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It's actually against Kickstarter's TOS (I'm pretty sure) to offer anything that isn't directly associated with the product as a reward level. Add-ons are trickier because they're a little less "official."

To be honest, I'm surprised addons do so well, especially in campaigns that choose not to go with a third-party pledge manager. Kickstarter's survey system is so bad you're basically throwing money into a pit and hoping you can communicate what you want to the creator (and also remember what you added when the time between campaign's-end and fulfillment is usually months and months apart.)

Technically, I think you can put basically whatever you want as an add-on. It doesn't break any rules and it's buyer beware.

Morally... ehhh I don't really see a problem with it. As a backer, it's much more annoying when exclusives (related to the project or not) are restricted to reward tiers far above what I'm willing to pay. For example...
* The Bee and Puppycat project had a cute Puppycat toy, but only in the $400 and up level.
* Wakfu is offering exclusive Krosmaster: Arena figures, but only at $100 and up.

I'm sure there are more... But the point is, I would rather be able to choose to add something than be forced to pledge for things I don't want.

In the situation you describe, I think it's better to offer those playmats as addons because then people with no interest in the project (but interest in the playmats) are able to pledge for only those. The project gets closer to goal and it seems like a win-win for everybody.
 
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Cornixt
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I don't really understand it. Presumably the person needs X orders for the game to be profitable, so they set the money success goal based on that. But adding extras is going to push you closer to the money amount without increasing your number of orders. Sure, they are getting more profit, but an extra $10 when they really need a $50 game sold is just going to make it harder for them unless they have already shot passed the main goal.
 
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Seamus O'Toole
Ireland
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I prefer that any exclusive content not be game altering. So playmats/tshirts/deckboxes/whatever with the company logo or game art would be fine. But such things should certainly be addons so they don't push the cost up for all the folk who don't want them.
 
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The Game Steward
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Reston
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cornixt wrote:
I don't really understand it. Presumably the person needs X orders for the game to be profitable, so they set the money success goal based on that. But adding extras is going to push you closer to the money amount without increasing your number of orders. Sure, they are getting more profit, but an extra $10 when they really need a $50 game sold is just going to make it harder for them unless they have already shot passed the main goal.


Typically, Add-ons have a higher profit margin than the core product (whatever it may be). So even if add-ons don't achieve the goal of lowering per-unit costs that additional core pledges would, they still make the project more financially viable overall.

The downside to add-ons, as someone pointed out, is that they make the logistics of a KS game project far more complicated. So adding more than one add-on options basically requires the use of a third-party pledge manager system, and a fulfillment service that will pack each individual order separately. In contrast, if a KS offers just the core game, fulfillment is very easy and you can use a mass fulfillment service like Amazon at a very reasonable price. (see Euphoria as an example).
 
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