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Subject: Two rules my group wasn't agreeing with. Please advise rss

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Yannick Carriere
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Played two games yesterday with 4 people and our group had two questions about the game that didn't make sense to us:

1. The rule doesn't mention that you can only develop a forest hex only of a company you have shares in. It's clear to me that rules don't prohibit developing a forest hex of any company, even of those you don't have shares in. But that didn't sit well with other players around the table. And I have to say that I agree with them. So is that an omission in the rules or can you indeed develop any forest hex counter on your turn?

2. Other players around the table also didn't like the fact that the treasury of each company wasn't divided amongst its shareholders. Why is the game designed that way?
 
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Jason Reid
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Bolga wrote:
Played two games yesterday with 4 people and our group had two questions about the game that didn't make sense to us:

1. The rule doesn't mention that you can only develop a forest hex only of a company you have shares in. It's clear to me that rules don't prohibit developing a forest hex of any company, even of those you don't have shares in. But that didn't sit well with other players around the table. And I have to say that I agree with them. So is that an omission in the rules or can you indeed develop any forest hex counter on your turn?


You can develop any forest hex you want. Sometimes it's important that you take the develop action, even if you don't have any forest hexes available on your own railroads.

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2. Other players around the table also didn't like the fact that the treasury of each company wasn't divided amongst its shareholders. Why is the game designed that way?


No way to know the answer to that question. The designer doesn't discuss his game on the forums. But this game has been through multiple editions; safe to say that this is his intent.

Somebody else with more sense of the history of the railroads might be able to offer a more satisfactory "thematic" answer. But ultimately, putting money in to the railroads isn't what this game is about.
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Eddie H
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Sorry about that, Chief
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Bolga wrote:
Played two games yesterday with 4 people and our group had two questions about the game that didn't make sense to us:

1. The rule doesn't mention that you can only develop a forest hex only of a company you have shares in. It's clear to me that rules don't prohibit developing a forest hex of any company, even of those you don't have shares in. But that didn't sit well with other players around the table. And I have to say that I agree with them. So is that an omission in the rules or can you indeed develop any forest hex counter on your turn?

Any hex: covered HERE.

Bolga wrote:
2. Other players around the table also didn't like the fact that the treasury of each company wasn't divided amongst its shareholders. Why is the game designed that way?

Because it works very very well that way.

There aren't many shares in the game, so you have to think very carefully about what shares to own. You have to consider many factors when bidding: who is helped by the share you buy, who is hurt, and what actions are dictated by the purchase (both your actions and the actions of others).

You just have to tell players beforehand that this is not your usual auction game.
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Matt Clark
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My understanding of the rules is that you can develop a forest hex as long as there is a locomotive in the hex. This would include developing a forest hex that contains a locomotive belonging to a company that you do not own shares in. I can't think of a lot of reasons you would do this unless you are pushing for a dividend phase (but you could just not perform the action after selecting it) or the end of the game, but it would be a legal move.

I can't speak for the designer, but I think dividing the treasuries would take a lot of tension out of the auctions as you could bid fairly high and just get a chunk of your money back later. Also this would reduce to pressure to use the money in the treasuries to build out on the board. Just my 2 cents, though.
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J C Lawrence
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Bolga wrote:
1. The rule doesn't mention that you can only develop a forest hex only of a company you have shares in.


Note also that a player can select an action and not do it. For example: selection the Capitalisation action and not putting up a share for auction. Timed well, such null actions can be powerful.
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Karl Rainer
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clearclaw wrote:
Bolga wrote:
1. The rule doesn't mention that you can only develop a forest hex only of a company you have shares in.


Note also that a player can select an action and not do it. For example: selection the Capitalisation action and not putting up a share for auction. Timed well, such null actions can be powerful.


... in fact, J.C. is probably understating the power of the null action. I'd go so far as to say that proper use of null actions is necessary and critical.
 
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J C Lawrence
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I'd hope I've written enough on the area not to have to rehash it all here.
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Eric Flood
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Bolga wrote:
Other players around the table also didn't like the fact that the treasury of each company wasn't divided amongst its shareholders. Why is the game designed that way?


Chicago Express is a game which borrows many of its mechanics from earlier iterations of similar designs by similar designers, under the collective umbrella of Winsome Games (the original publisher of Chicago Express). There are earlier games which are quite similar to Chicago Express where the treasury of each company *does* get divided among the shareholders. They might be slightly difficult to find, but I should think you could find a copy with relative ease. Note that Winsome games are purposefully toned-down, so do not expect pretty pieces.

Most (if not all) of the games in the Prairie Railroads series do this.
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Bruce Murphy
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The Riding Series (And Dutch InterCity) are other fine examples.

B>
 
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