David Minken
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Connect More to your family, friends, and community over a board game.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ABOUT THE GAME
Year: 2014
Designers: Thomas Vande Ginste & Wolf Plancke
Publisher: Pandasaurus Games
Background: Kill Shakespeare is the sophomore effort of the designer duo of Thomas and Wolf. Chances are that you are here reading this right now not due to your overwhelming desire to jump back to high school English class and learn about Shakespeare, but because the designers are the same guys behind the very thematic and immersive game - Yedo. I know that is why I came here...but let me tell you a few reasons that I discovered as to why I do not want to leave.

WHO AM I?

Why do you care about my opinion? There are several reasons:

1. I have the distinct advantage of having a copy of the Kill Shakespeare prototype game sitting here, right infront of me on the table. I also have had the pleasure of exchanging multiple emails with one of the designers to make sure I am crystal clear on the mechanics, rules, and intent behind the game. But most importantly, I have also played the game. So, keep that in mind as you read this - my experience is with the prototype board so I cannot comment on components, but I am experienced with the core of the game. For this reason as well, this review will be generally absent of any pictures - my apologies.

2. The information surrounding this game is remarkably void. For a fully funded board game that is ~ half way through its kickstarter campaign it is surprising to see (or not see) any information about the game play itself. So what are people backing exactly?! Like me, I am sure you are backing the designers, who clearly established themselves with their rookie effort. The Kickstarter and BGG websites are remarkably void of any meaningful discussion. Let me shed some light!

3. Is my opinion biased? Probably - I am a big fan of the designers. Their first impression has been a lasting one. I hope to make enough observations and factual statements about the game that you will be able to form your own opinion. My objective is to fill some of the information voids that potential Kickstarter backers want filled before committing to any Kickstarter campaign.

GAME OVERVIEW

General Mechanics
Kill Shakespeare is a semi-cooperative board game. You and the rest of the players are members of the Prodigal rebellion. You each assume the role of a different character who has a unique ability (variable player powers) from the Kill Shakespeare comic series - Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, Falstaff, and Viola. The prodigal rebellion (i.e. you and your buddies playing) must rise up against King Richard III and Lady MacBeth (the game) and successfully defeat them...or they win and the rebellion is crushed. But like any good rebellious fighter, it is not good enough to simply win the battle. No, you want to emerge as the hero from the rebellion (or, in this case, be the one with the most victory points…if you all survive).

King Richard's power, or influence, across the land is represented by black cubes scattered over 8 different regions. It is up to the Prodigal rebellion to oppose and overcome the heavy hand of King Richard by capturing and gaining the area control/influence in their favor throughout the course of the game.

Being up against such a formidable foe as King Richard, it is not just good enough to walk around (area movement) spreading influence to counter act his. No, you and your pals must go on quests that will help you achieve certain advantages and benefits that not only help the group, but act to help you emerge as the hero when the game is over. Ignoring these quests, or being unable to complete them, shows that the rebellion is lazy, half-hearted, cannot work together, and cannot succeed. Trading (catan-style) resources may be required to get all the necessary inputs (set collection) to complete a quest.

Resources are acquired throughout through a variety of mechanisms including auction/bidding on different card decks, card drafting, the wheel of fortune and, of course, by successfully completing quests. The auctions are extremely interesting in that some of the cards you are bidding on are not revealed during the auction phase (unless you have earned a special ability or benefit). Similarly, each player has a fixed number of bidding tokens in pre-determined denominations that they use to bid. The bids made are either completely secret or half secret, which keeps you guessing if other members of the rebellion are going to work with you or stab you in the back. By its very nature, this bidding mechanic introduces some negotiation among the rebellious prodigals.

Despite all your planning, your efforts may still be thwarted. Like any great cooperative game you inevitably find yourself making agonizing, press your luck, decisions in moments when it appears that King Richard will crush the rebellion. Your luck and fate can also be determined by dice rolling, which can have both positive and negative impacts (depending on the side of the sword you are on)!

Image is of the PROTOTYPE BOARD at the end of a 3p game. I am posting with the permission of one of the designers.

Game Experience
Now, I realize that for a lot of people a game described as "semi-coop" is an instant turnoff. In fact, when I mentioned this with my group I got a groan and a roll of the eyes. For me, the semi-cooperative nature of the game is phenomenal.

The theme and the mechanics are very closely interlaced. One certainly cannot accuse this game as having a pasted on theme - far from. The integration of theme and mechanics bleeds into the game type. A rebellion full of bright eyed, adventurous souls, who all want to be remembered for their part in history provides a perfect setting for a semi-cooperative game. Nobody remembers the leader of a rebellion that gets crushed before it even gets started…

The semi-cooperative nature of this game introduces a phenomenal tension level and can be felt almost immediately (depending on your fate this game). You have to work together - there are rounds that go by where everyone is completely cooperative because the game forces you to be. But once tension is relieved, or perceived to be relieved, the flood gates open for treachery, negotiations, and a race to achieve personal glory before someone snags it from you. Deciding when the appropriate time to switch from "hey, let's work together" to "every man for himself" mentality is critical. Personally, I really enjoy games that require a mental or strategic shift. Timing is critical and is different every game depending on the game situation and the group you are playing with.

Sometimes the tension is never relieved. The game play becomes very cooperative but with an underlying hint of deceit. Figuring out what to do that benefits the group, but also helps you provides for some very interesting decisions.

The people I have played it with all want to play again. Like many great, immersive games, this is certainly a game that gets better the deeper you explore it. It will take several games to become well versed in the various strategic options required for the prodigals to survive and for one to emerge a hero.

What are the most engaging phases or elements of the game?
For me, the cooperative play was amazing. I actually feel like I am a part of a gang and we are all working together for the greater good. Me and my buddies are going on adventures/quests together and trying to help each other out.

On the other hand, the quests provide some sweet personal benefits to the person who completes them. Benefits can be direct (i.e. straight victory points) but can also be more subtle by awarding you with resources to help the rebellion, and win favour with the other prodigals. Getting the resources required to complete the quests, and perhaps trying to get them before your so called buddy nabs them from you is by no means a trivial task. It requires cunning bidding, some negotiation, and when required some back stabbing. Doing all of this in a tension filled environment where King Richard III would like nothing better than to destroy you all is extremely intense and engaging.

Recommended # of players?
The game is advertised for 2-4 players. Slight modifications are made based on player number to the general setup, which accommodates each player count very well. Let's break down some of the main ways the game adapts itself to the player number:

1. The game comes with two different player boards for each character in the game - one for 2p, and one for 3/4 players. This is necessary since the number of cards available to win each round during the bidding phase is doubled - you will receive 2, instead of just 1.

2. The number of actions each player gets during the action phase - the part where you actually complete quests, spread influence, and generally try to cause mayhem for King Richard II - is player number dependent. In a 2/3/4p game, each player gets 4/3/2 actions, each with the possibility of having a special additional action should you have the right card.

3. Cost of events. This is described later.

4. Individual scoring. Many of the scoring elements give VPs to not only the leader or winner of a particular category, but to the runner ups as well. Rather than getting into everything that will give you VPs I will simply state that, generally, there will always be one person who gets nothing. For a 4p game the VPs (again for some elements) are distributed as 3/2/1 VPs for the 1st/2nd/3rd finishers in that category. The last guy is S.O.L. In a 3p game the VP distribution is 3/1. Finally in a 2p game the winner gets 2 VPs.

These modifications work very well to keeping the experience engaging at all player counts.

Playing Time?
It seems that the designers of Yedo like to make big, meaty, quest filled games that demand to be the center of attention for any game's night. Using Yedo as a comparison, Kill Shakespeare plays slightly quicker for a given number of players. For experienced players, a 2p game will likely clock in on around 90 minutes. With 4 players - expect a very solid 2 hour game. I should note that this is highly dependent on the group. There is a lot of discussion, puzzling, and strategy that is discussed during the cooperative part of the game, which directly impacts the length of play.

One of the biggest complaints I see about Yedo is that it is too long for a game that may screw you at the end with an unlucky event or action card. Some people get upset that their entire evening of work is for nothing with some bad cards. So, if Kill Shakespeare is a big meaty game will you have the some complaint? In a word - no.

There are certainly things that increase the tension, but there is certainly not one thing that will ruin the experience for you. All it does it is force you to discuss, negotiate, and plan harder. This active engagement with the other players (which is much less present in Yedo), and the puzzle at hand, melts the time away like a hot knife through butter. The semi-cooperative nature of the game introduces a new layer to the puzzle and the enhances the immersive experience.

GAME PLAY
Sequence of Play
The game plays over 6 rounds. Each round consists of 5 distinct phases:

1. Prep Phase. This consists of your standard cleanup that you might expect in most games of this magnitude.

The highlight of this phase is the opportunity to trade 3 of the King Richard influence cubes that you earned in a previous turn for what are referred to as 'Battle Tokens'. Battle tokens are chits numbered 1-3 that are worth VPs during each of the scoring phases. Should you choose to do so, you draw 3 battle tokens out of a bag, choose 1 to keep and put the others back.

BUT, there are some dagger tokens (and you can only get 7 daggers before you all lose) interspersed in this pile as well. Although it is good for you individually to score VPs, you may get a lot of pressure from others NOT to do this...especially if the tension is already high. This always provides for some great table talk, especially with people who have different risk tolerances.

2. Event Phase. As you might expect, the game will throw events your way that you have to adapt to...or do you?! The way the events are handled in Kill Shakespeare are awesome - let me explain. Events act to do several things.

First they control where King Richard and Lady Macbeth will move this turn. This happens automatically and is beyond your control. This results in the spreading of more bad influence tokens and possibly the removal of some of the good guy's influence.

Secondly the events may force players to make a choice between what is good for the group and what is good for them. Most events have a fairly negative impact on the group's progress but can be offset by something positive for certain individual players.

Each event has a cost associated with it that the prodigal rebellion can collectively pay to cancel the event. After evaluating the event's consequences all players bid on whether or not the event should occur. This generally involves taking the cost to cancel the event, dividing it by the number of players and "agreeing" that everyone should pay around that amount. This is a completely blind bid...introduce the treachery and backstabbing!

Whether or not the events and their associated consequences occur is completely within the player's control. When and how you choose to exercise your control can be detrimental or glorious.

Events may also come with a dagger token on them, which only acts to keep the tension at a steady boiling state. The dagger is an additional cost to cancel - if you do not pay that cost (again, through the blind bid), then the rebellion is just one step closer to failure.

3. Bidding Phase. There are 5 different things to bid on during this phase. All of these things are inputs for the quests, wild cards, or negative Iago cards. So you and your cohorts have to start planning what quests you each want to (or are able to) accomplish and prepare yourselves to be able to do so.

Many of the quests require you to use time (represented by your bidding tokens) and/or energy/fitness to complete. These are represented on your player board and are the first two things that you "bid" on. You are not so much bidding on these items since nobody can oppose you. But you have to use your bid tokens to modify these things, which may weaken your bidding power for the next three things, where the bids are competitive.

Player board preparation is very similar to the planning phase of Freedom: The Underground Railroad. The planning is done simultaneously, allowing everyone to examine the puzzle at hand, discuss it, and get prepared.

The final 3 things you bid on are player order, prophecy cards, and sidekick cards. What makes these three bids unique?

1. Some of the cards are hidden on each of the card tracks. Buried in each deck are treacherous Iago, or trader, cards that give negative VPs to the player that "wins" them, but also have the annoying characteristic of sticking around and generally causing trouble for the rest of the prodigals. But, there can also be good things - this uncertainty provides an interesting dilemma that is entirely dependent on your objectives for the turn and what you might expect others to do.

2. During these bids you are limited to using only two of your bid tokens. When you bid, you bid with 1 token stacked on top of the other. The rest of the players can see the top value, but the bottom value is a mystery.

3. Before the bids 2 D6's are rolled. There is a 25% chance of bad stuff occurring (if you roll a 10, 11, or 12). If you roll anything less than 10, then it provides a bidding goal. Suppose you roll an '8'. That means that any bid you make that has a total value of '8' will earn you an action card (only once per bid phase).

4. Special bid modifiers exist. Juliet has one as a part of her character and another exists in the game that can be won by anyone. Once bids for a particular category are revealed and the hidden cards are revealed, these modifiers can be used to change your bid once you see how it stacks up. These modifiers can also be used to modify the bidding on the events (described above).

4. Action Phase. This is where you do stuff and hope that all of your planning has come together. You may complete quests, spread your influence, battle King Richard, and generally wreak havoc on King Richard, Lady MacBeth, and (depending on your strategy) each other. This is, simply, executing your plans.

5. Point Scoring Phase. Although VPs are scored by a variety of ways during game play, there are two distinct scoring phases that occur after the 3rd round and again at the end of the game. These provide some excellent mid and end game targets to work towards to help you emerge the hero.

Rules and Rule Explanation
Currently there are no rule sets available to download. I am sure that they are coming shortly. So instead of trying to rewrite the rules I have made a video detailing the rules, game examples, etc. This is a part of my AVOID THE RULES video series and can be found here: http://boardgamegeek.com/video/41549/kill-shakespeare/kill-s...

Once I had the rules clear, instructing the game was straight forward as the mechanics are thematically significant, at times fairly unique (the bidding phase) and straight forward. Since everything that you do can be tied to the theme, the rules explanation is a great time to immerse people into the theme as well.

Game Balance
A common fear with any game that introduces variable player powers, such as this one, is that the players may not be balanced (i.e. it might be more advantageous to be one character over another). My experience is that the game is very tight with players of similar experience level.

The gap widens with treachery. Choosing the appropriate time to be treacherous can be hugely beneficial. Conversely, inopportune timing could lead to yours and possibly the group's failure. But this gap does not appear to be caused by differences in player power - just differences in player strategy.

I should note that to properly evaluate this I would have to play each character 3 or 4 times each to make a final conclusion. I have not done this.

HOW DOES THIS COMPARE TO YEDO?
I only include some commentary on this subject because I know people will ask. I will keep it brief because these are two entirely different games. The unifying links is that they are made by the same designers, are oozing theme (like an overloaded grilled cheese sandwich oozing cheese onto your plate), and are based around quests that are necessary to accomplish to win the game. The required inputs necessary to complete quests can be achieved through bids, trading, and the clever use of cards and actions.

Yedo, however, is dominantly a worker placement game. Kill Shakespeare is dominantly a cooperative and and area/control influence game. This changes the entire game experience. Personally, I love both games and have a place for both of them on my shelf. I love all the aspects that they have in common but also love how they are integrated into two completely different gaming experiences.

WHO IS THE TARGET AUDIENCE?
For simplicity, let's divide the potential target audience for this game into 3 groups:

1. Non-gamers and Non-lovers of Shakespeare.
Now, I hate the terms I chose to use to describe this group already - but bear with me. What is a non-gamer? And is the Shakespeare you learned in high school really the same as Kill Shakespeare? I hope you understand what I mean by this group - I do not want to engage in a long drawn-out discussion as to what a gamer is or isn't.

With this group, this game will not be appealing at all. It is a meaty game that is cloaked in a theme that is perceived to be boring (based on past experiences). The more I learn about Kill Shakespeare the more I can assure you that the subject matter is far from boring - it is awesome! This is certainly not how I remember Shakespeare. This is either a sign that I have matured or that the Kill Shakespeare creators are extremely creative and innovative. I asked my wife and she confirmed that it is certainly not my maturity that has improved.

Without any sort of 'hook', this game will be a difficult sell here.

2. Gamers who know nothing about Kill Shakespeare.
Judging the game solely on mechanics and game play alone, Kill Shakespeare is very solid. Gamers are drawn and attracted to excellent games and often consider theme as a secondary element or priority to the game - we are quite ok with a theme that is 'pasted on'. If you are like me though, thematic game experiences usually provide a catalyst for further investigation and query. Since introducing this game to my group, several members have made a point to go pick up the Kill Shakespeare books - the game pulled them into this new and wonderful world.

3. Kill Shakespeare fans who are non-gamers.
It does not take a long time of being a BGG regular to witness enraged debates about whether or not a particular game is a good 'gateway' game? Or, what is a "gateway" game exactly? Or, why do we label things like this? Or, why do we limit ourselves to the standards such as Ticket to Ride, Carcassone, or Settlers?

In my experience, a game is a hit if it has the ability to build a positive report between itself and the players. This is no different than your personal relationships with the people around you. If you can build a positive report with each other it, generally, leads to a positive and rewarding relationship.

How do you build a positive report with someone? One way is by speaking to their interests. Since the mechanics of the game are so heavily laced in the Kill Shakespeare theme it will be more intuitive for a fan of the comics to pick up and enjoy!

FINAL THOUGHTS
This game is awesome! It is a hit! Do not flinch or wince next time you hear me say, "semi coop". Instead, embrace an evening immersed in cooperation, treachery, negotiation, and the wonderful world of kill shakespeare that I am only now beginning to discover!

I certainly hope you can now make an informed decision on this game!

A complete geeklist of my written and video reviews is HERE.
42 
 Thumb up
5.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
James Moline
United States
Tampa
FL
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Backed this immediately because I love Yedo so much. Glad to hear your positive impressions! I'm very excited to get this.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
A L D A R O N
United States
Cambridge
Massachusetts
flag msg tools
----[---->+<]>++.+++++++++++.--------.---.>-[--->+<]>---.---.-.
badge
ACT AS IF THE TRUTH IS REAL
Avatar
mb
ConnectMore wrote:
I thought Shakespeare was supposed to be boring
You lost me right there.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Deems
United States
Fullerton
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Probably not my cup of tea. But having said that, this is a solid review. The review was informative and complete . Keep up the good work.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Harrison
United States
Fisher
Illinois
flag msg tools
So long ...
badge
... and thanks for all the fish.
Avatar
mb
No, he’s just boring live.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Vande Ginste
Belgium
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks a lot !!!! This is really great for our game. Finally people will get an idea of what they can expect. As david states, the picture is prototype. The final game will remain gameplaywise almost exact, only layout will be a lot different .

Thanks a lot for this great impressions !
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clyde W
United States
Washington
Dist of Columbia
flag msg tools
Red Team
badge
#YOLO
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Aldaron wrote:
ConnectMore wrote:
I thought Shakespeare was supposed to be boring
You lost me right there.
Same. I'm 100% certain most Shakespeare is infinitely more entertaining than Kill Shakespeare is.
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Vande Ginste
Belgium
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Think it was just a joke. Don't take this too seriously .
Hope you ll like the game anyway .
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Charlie Theel
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review David. Very detailed and informative. Really looking forward to this game.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wolf Plancke
Belgium
Kortrijk
West Vlaanderen
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Superb review

many thanks David

Wolf
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Conor McCreery
msg tools
As one of the creators of Kill Shakespeare I can confirm that the original is DEFINITELY better -- I mean, how could you ever TOP Shakespeare?

Buuuuut, we're pretty fun too. If you love your Shakespeare this is a loving homage - and there are TONS of Easter Eggs hidden in our book - we actually have an Absolute Edition coming where a team of Profs worked together to annotate it all.

HOWEVER, if you're new to his work, or had a particularly awful teacher that scarred you, Anthony and I worked really hard to make our world super easy to dive into. The game and comics will let you enjoy everything that makes Shakespeare classic: love, lust, double crosses, cross-dressing, fools, faeries, balconies and bears - it's in there.

If anyone wants to see/learn more about the underlying world feel free to drop me a line at muchado@killshakespeare.com and I can send you a PDF of the first couple of issues of the original series.

Thanks

Conor

11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Olsen
United States
South Saint Paul
Minnesota
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
email sent.

Backing based on good comments of Yedo and always having a use for a good coop.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Debije
Netherlands
Eindhoven
The Netherlands
flag msg tools
Really terrible title, though.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Fortney
United States
Evansville
IN
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great read. I love the "Kill Shakespeare" series (the "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" of the Bardverse) and can't wait to try the game. Though semi-coops are usually a turnoff for me as well. I'm hoping for a solid coop variant.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Smales
United States
Rome
New York
flag msg tools
badge
Colonel Peter Gansevoort (1749 – 1812) Defender of Ft. Stanwix, Rome, N.Y., 1777
Avatar
mbmbmb
This high school English teacher who loves Shakespeare is looking forward to your new game's release.

Don't forget to proofread your workcoolwhistle
Good luck with the final stages of development--

"The rest is silence."
Hamlet
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Minken
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Connect More to your family, friends, and community over a board game.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
theescapist wrote:
Great read. I love the "Kill Shakespeare" series (the "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" of the Bardverse) and can't wait to try the game. Though semi-coops are usually a turnoff for me as well. I'm hoping for a solid coop variant.

Adam - I think a solid coop variant might be tough. Why? There are so many decisions in this game that are both detrimental to the group while being beneficial to a particular individual(s). I think it would be a major overhaul to the core game to try and make this completely coop. (But Iwill let the designers weigh in).

That being said - a lot of the game plays in a very cooperative fashion because it is, simply, required because the group tension can run quite high.

Thanks for reading on your comments - much appreciated!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Vande Ginste
Belgium
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yep , thanks for commenting.

It is semi co op. But as David says, the pressure can be high. So even if you don't win in the end, you are part of the victory.
The winner needed you too to be able to fight the bad guys off.
I think , this game has a different feel than other semi co op. It s supposed to be a real adventure, not a math game. Where you feel that you , as a group have to fight together. And only ones in a while, there ' s a tiny chance to do something to benefit yourself.

Well , I hope people just give it a try, even if they hete the genre. And maybe afterward they know why they hate it or they will change their minds

greets,

Thomas
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Minken
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
badge
Connect More to your family, friends, and community over a board game.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
As promised in the text of this review, here is the link to the AVOID THE RULES video. The video describes the rules and game play in detail:

http://boardgamegeek.com/video/41549/kill-shakespeare/kill-s...

Enjoy!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Wilson
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
That game wasn't half bad...
badge
...no, it was ALL bad! Dohohoho!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
Great review, thanks!

I want this game. I love the Bard, and will get around to reading these comics eventually. And the production concerns don't bother me much; I have my own cubes for such things, and that seems to be the biggest complaint I've heard.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Baylis
United Kingdom
Unspecified
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Unfortunately someone didn't heed the advice to proofread
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mark Wilson
United States
Columbus
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
That game wasn't half bad...
badge
...no, it was ALL bad! Dohohoho!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
So I just got this game, and there's been some interest in learning/playing among my group. Due to the notoriously poor rulebook and the relative difficulty in explaining all of the rules for this game in a succinct and coherent manner, your rules video and supplemental printouts have been a big help in figuring out how I'm going to approach teaching this game. Thanks for all the work you've put in!

I love the premise of this game, so I'm cautiously optimistic that it will be a hit. But it's also longer and more involved than most my group plays, so we'll see. Here's hoping...
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls