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Twilight Imperium (Third Edition)» Forums » General

Subject: Getting friends to play TI with you rss

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Tyler Lutz
United States
San Antonio
TX
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I feel like this is the biggest hurdle with this game, is getting people to actually play with you. Even if they aren't scared away by the amount of rules, scheduling conflicts ruin everything.

How do YOU get people to play with you? How do you entice them? Just curious....
 
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Starkiller
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Give a prize. $10 itunes giftcard to the winner, and they crawl out of the woodwork begging you to let them play....

Just kidding! I have not actually tried this yet, but I've read a couple session reports where they have a monetary prize, and I've considered doing it next game. I'm betting it makes the game feel even more epic....

It certainly can't hurt the motivation....whistle
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Magic Octopus
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Tampere
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My solution has been to throughout the years to increase the "player pool" (now up to 13 people) and schedule early (weeks in advance). That way, the game doesn't get cancelled due to a couple of absentees, and the people who want to be there have time to adjust their schedules.

I'm always on the lookout for new Twilight Imperium players. Some of them I've found online by posting a recruiting thread in a board game forum.
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J H
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I usually tell them that the game itself is simple. There are many possible things to in the game which makes it great. All the rules are simply for that. "Don't worry I'll take care of the rules. You just enjoy. Look at these ships, aren't they great?"

It works.

What I usually do:

* Take about 5-10 minutes to explain the general idea. Then we immediately play with a random map.
* Round 1: new players understood general idea but were confused by details. They ask lots of questions.
* Round 2: understand the details but can't remember all. Some questions.
* Round 3: everybody was comfortable. Almost no questions.

By the second and third game, they'd know all there's needed to play. Maybe not all the FAQs, but that's my job.

I'd say it's unnecessary, and even counter-productive, to explain all the rules. My friends learn faster by playing. If you take an hour to explain the rules, nobody will want to play.
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John Smith
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Get more friends and look for new playgroups. You'll have more opportunities to play, and you'll meet TI players with totally different play style. Profit!
 
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Erik Bade
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Stanwood
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I break the game up over several sessions. Five 2 hour sessions is easier to swallow that one 10 hour one. Plus it almost makes the game even more epic. Lasting all month.
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Ivan Kosak
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On my last session I cooked a big pot of beans. We bought beers, wine, red bull and we were ready to play one epic (11 hours game). There were real fire from our ships at the end of game ;-)
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Jonathan Challis
United Kingdom
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Easy - I have a circle of friends all wanting to play this and other big games. If you don't, then honestly you have the wrong question - you should be looking for other games...
 
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Justin Rio
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I have offered to play a shortened/time-limited session just to introduce people to TI. That way they'd have a better idea of whether or not they wanted to commit to a whole game rather than having to commit just to find out if they like it. I got a few bites, though we still need to make it happen. I did do this for one couple, and they both really enjoyed the game and want to play a full game soon.
 
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Jan Probst
Germany
Kiel
Schleswig Holstein
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Try 3P. Should be a good bit easier on both length and scheduling.
TI is of course rather unsatisfying in 3P, but I found it rather adequate enough for people to learn and practice rules, and get hooked.
 
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Jon Horne
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There are plenty of nerds out there, but you have to find them first. So you gotta advertise. Start a Meetup group and/or Yahoo group. Make a FaceBook page. Post on Craigslist. Ask your FLGS if you can put up fliers. It took us a few years, but we now have a group of ~12 gamers of varying levels of availability. We play TI3 about once a month. Slots tend to fill up pretty quickly, and we regularly get 6 to 8 players.
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Scott M.
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Come to the Dice Tower 2014 Convention in orlando..

Ill sit and play it with YA!...
 
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JH
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The way I did it last time was to make it the main event of my birthday party. That way people are obligated to do what you want, and you can hold the cake hostage if anyone gets out of line.
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Lance Harrop
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I have a friend who throws games in his basement. Very nice. very large tables.

I occasionally throw games at the Game Parlor in Chantilly.

And some others.

Not as often as I used to, sad to say.
 
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Adam Wehn
United States
Norwich
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magicoctopus wrote:
My solution has been to throughout the years to increase the "player pool" (now up to 13 people) and schedule early (weeks in advance). That way, the game doesn't get cancelled due to a couple of absentees, and the people who want to be there have time to adjust their schedules.

I'm always on the lookout for new Twilight Imperium players. Some of them I've found online by posting a recruiting thread in a board game forum.


My friend(Who I've nicknamed "Generalissimo" because he does most of the organizing) asked me a while ago what I thought about trying to play the game more. The first thing I said was to start planning early, and he had also asked about a timetable for how often to play. My suggestion for that was try to do it every 4 to 6 weeks, this gives players enough time to clear their brains from the intensity of the game but it also allows them to retain knowledge earned from the previous game.
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Edwin Priest
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magicoctopus wrote:
My solution has been to throughout the years to increase the "player pool" (now up to 13 people) and schedule early (weeks in advance). That way, the game doesn't get cancelled due to a couple of absentees, and the people who want to be there have time to adjust their schedules.

I'm always on the lookout for new Twilight Imperium players. Some of them I've found online by posting a recruiting thread in a board game forum.


This is the strategy that has worked for me as well and I would echo this advice. Over the years I have gradually found and recruited interested players, and there are actually a lot of us out there. Our "player pool" is now over 20, enough to consistently run two tables of five or six, and even once three tables.

I think the keys to making this work for me have been:

1. Find existing players--Ask at other game groups or cons you attend, recruit on local online forums or even here on BGG, and always be on the lookout.
2. Recruit new players--There are a lot of new players out there who are interested in trying TI3 but just haven't had an opportunity. Not everyone will be a convert, but many of them will become future regulars.
3. Schedule the games in advance, create an expectation that it will be a regular event and make it happen.
4. Find the right location--This can sometimes be the most difficult, especially if you can't or don't want to host at home. I don't have any great advice here for you, you need to figure out what works best for your situation. I am lucky to have a big basement and tables and chairs. I also provide food.

Good luck.
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Just Another User
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ERPriest wrote:
I am lucky to have a big basement and tables and chairs. I also provide food.

Good luck.


Ed, we greatly appreciate it, too! See you at the next one!
 
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Scott Randolph
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ERPriest wrote:
magicoctopus wrote:
My solution has been to throughout the years to increase the "player pool" (now up to 13 people) and schedule early (weeks in advance). That way, the game doesn't get cancelled due to a couple of absentees, and the people who want to be there have time to adjust their schedules.

I'm always on the lookout for new Twilight Imperium players. Some of them I've found online by posting a recruiting thread in a board game forum.


This is the strategy that has worked for me as well and I would echo this advice. Over the years I have gradually found and recruited interested players, and there are actually a lot of us out there. Our "player pool" is now over 20, enough to consistently run two tables of five or six, and even once three tables.

I think the keys to making this work for me have been:

1. Find existing players--Ask at other game groups or cons you attend, recruit on local online forums or even here on BGG, and always be on the lookout.
2. Recruit new players--There are a lot of new players out there who are interested in trying TI3 but just haven't had an opportunity. Not everyone will be a convert, but many of them will become future regulars.
3. Schedule the games in advance, create an expectation that it will be a regular event and make it happen.
4. Find the right location--This can sometimes be the most difficult, especially if you can't or don't want to host at home. I don't have any great advice here for you, you need to figure out what works best for your situation. I am lucky to have a big basement and tables and chairs. I also provide food.

Good luck.


This is exactly what I do, been doing it for 7 years now, 40+ games of TI3. It takes effort, continuous effort, and recruiting is the life blood of a TI3 group. It's worth it!
 
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