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Mansions of Madness: Forbidden Alchemy» Forums » General

Subject: Speed Painting Tutorial: Byahkee rss

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Introduction: What with Cthulhu Wars arriving in a few months, I figured I'd get some practice painting, particularly speed painting. Actually, speed painting is something of a misnomer for this tutorial, since I'm using washes instead of paints.

Washes are typically paints and/or inks thinned with water and paint mediums, such as matte medium or even glue. Thanks to capillary action and gravity, the pigments in washes settle better than paints into cracks and recesses in a miniature, automagically shading them. Additionally, I find it easier to work with a watery medium than a thicker one, making opaque washes a better, faster, way of painting than conventional basecoats. A washed figure also makes further painting with hobby paints easier.

For washes, I prefer Secret Weapon washes. Secret Weapon has a wide variety of not only colors, but also shades, so I can use one color as a basecoat or highlighter color, and the other as a shade. It's possible to make your own washes, but I can paint more miniatures with several short paint sessions, than trying to find time for fewer longer ones.

Wash and Ink Supplies:
* Prismacolor red brush-tipped pen (eyes).
* Secret Wash Concrete and Soft Black Body washes (body).

Preparation: Plastic and metal miniatures are made in molds, and an oil called mold release is used to help eject the miniature from the mold. As a result, mold lines are often visible on a miniature. The hobby knife and file are commonly used to remove mold lines, but I recommend using a jewelry engraving pen. This "pen" is a handheld battery operated "drill" with a industry-diamond tip that quickly rotates, more easily removing mold lines. The pen sells for under $10 at craft stores. After removing mold lines, clean the miniatures in water with a little soap to remove the mold release oil.

Priming: Primer helps paint stick to the miniature. Common colors are white, grey, and black. Hardware stores sell primer made for use with plastics. When priming, shake the can well, and prime the nozzle with a brief burst away from the miniatures. Starting a few inches from the side of the miniatures, spray them with sweeping motions, rather than direct bursts from the can. I like to use zenithal priming: Completely coat the miniature in black, then, with lighter sprays, coat in grey then white. By partially covering the black primer with grey and white, the visible black acts like a shade for the miniature, while the white makes applying highlights easier.

Mounting: Finally, instead of handling the miniature directly, use superglue or sticky-tack to hold the miniature on a paint pot or prescription bottle. The Mansions of Madness monsters have a peg, so I used alligator clips as well. A binder clip should also work.


Miniatures with zenithal priming
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Basecoat Wash: Thanks to capillary action, you can quickly cover a large area of a miniature faster than paints, yet not accidentally put paint on a wrong area of the miniature. You can even use a cheaper craft brush with a good tip, rather than an expensive hobby paint brush.

The color scheme is that of the grey byahkee from the Arkham Horror boardgame's byahkee monster token. Thus, I chose the Secret Weapon Concrete wash, which is an opaque light grey wash.

Eyes: I frequently paint the eyes early, to provide a "focus" for the miniature. With monster eyes, I use a red Prismacolor brush-tip pen. It's easier to use than red paint.


First coat with Secret Wash Concrete wash.
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Detail and Shade Wash: For the wings, I still used the Soft Body Black wash, but used it more like a glaze: With the side of the brush, I carefully went over the raised edges of the non-membrane sections of the wings. Any wash that went in the wrong places I quickly dabbed with another brush, or blended into the membrane. For the body, I used the wash more traditionally, covering the body with a slightly thinned wash.


Wings glazed and body washed with Secret Wash Soft Body Black.


And that's all you have to do! I did some further touch-up with the Concrete and Soft Black Body washes, but this is an easy (and inexpensive) model to paint. You can use these washes for the zombies as well, and continue painting them with regular hobby paints.
 
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