Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 Hide
12 Posts

Takenoko» Forums » Rules

Subject: gardener and panda movement rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ryan McManemin
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
this might be a silly question, but the rulebook states that the gardener and panda can only move in a "straight line." what exactly does this mean? isn't every point on the gameboard in a "straight line" from any hex?
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randall Bart
United States
Winnetka
California
flag msg tools
designer
Baseball been bery bery good to me
badge
This is a picture of a published game designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A straight line along the hexes
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Darren Belcher
Australia
New Norfollk
Tasmania
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
In the context of a hexagon based board game it means you have to keep travelling in the direction of the edge through which you exit your current hex.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Paulo Renato
Portugal
Vila Nova Gaia
Porto
flag msg tools
I run through Rahdo's Runthroughs and make right what once went wrong (via annotations)
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
To be more clear... Go see the watchitplayed video that teaches all the rules perfectely so you can have a visual example
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Trevin Beattie
United States
Eugene
Oregon
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
To put it another way, the line segment between the center of the starting hex and the center of the destination hex must include the center of every hex it passes through and bisect their edges.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ryan McManemin
United States
flag msg tools
mbmbmb
much clearer! thanks everybody!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ariel
Chile
Vina del Mar
V. Region
flag msg tools
badge
constantly thinking on variants to create and implement
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
A rather strange doubt...

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Murr Rockstroh
United States
Fleming Island
Florida
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I had this same question and couldn't find anything that would imply that it was intended to be plot to plot through the centers of each hex tile.

Rules state:
The player moves the gardener in a straight line, any number
of plots in the direction of his choice. The gardener is only
allowed to move over plots, not empty spaces between plots.


and

The player moves the panda in a straight line, any number of
plots in the direction of his choice. The panda is only allowed
to move over plots, not empty spaces between plots.


More notes on movement include (from the rulebook)
Details on the movements
• The gardener and the Panda can cross or end
their movement on the special “pond tile”.
• They cannot cross an empty space between two
plots and must stop before the empty space.
• To benefit from their action (Gardener or Panda), a
player must move them at least one space.

And in the FAQ, there's nothing that clears this up.

Edit: I'm not disagreeing with the "center to center" movement, just pointing out that it's really not that clearly stated in the rules, where an example in the pictures could have easily cleared it up.

Thanks for the clarification... now to play the game correctly!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Scott
New Zealand
Auckland
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Chango wrote:
A rather strange doubt...



Not at all. It is a very valid question. In chess both the bishop and the rook move only in straight lines but I don't think any one here will argue that bishops and rooks move in the same way.

The designer's intent may well be implicitly illustrated in the rules but those pictures can only be understood to be illustrative of possibility, not restrictive. If they are restrictive then that means a panda can only move to the right three hexes.

But, you argue, it says in the rules that it can move any number of plots so it's not restricted to just three hexes.

Fine, I say, the rules only say straight line, they do not specify direction.



Obviously those two blue arrows don't form a single straight line so that movement would be illegal in a single action and one of those pink arrows is over a gap so that is also illegal.

But, the other pink line (which is identical in size and direction to its twin) does not go over a gap and neither does the yellow line. As both are also straight they must be legal. They start in the same hexes and end in the same hexes as their counterparts so they must be the same moves. The pink pair is particular contentious.

That is why we have access to and should use the word "orthogonal".

Rooks pass orthogonally through the edges of their squares in a straight line. Bishops move along either of the diagonals in a straight line. In both cases straight is necessary but not sufficient to describe movement. Without specifying straight zig-zags would be legal. Without specifying (in some way) orthogonal and diagonal, there is nothing to stop rooks moving like bishops since both just move straight.

dbelcher wrote:
In the context of a hexagon based board game it means you have to keep travelling in the direction of the edge through which you exit your current hex.


Edges are one dimensional objects. You mean at right angles to the edge which you exit.

My experience is apparently contrary to yours. The vast majority of hex based games actually mean "straight line" when they specify "straight line". A typical rule might read, line of sight (LOS) is blocked if a straight line from the centre of the attacker's hex to the centre of the target hex passes through any part of a hex that contains a unit and/or terrain capable of blocking LOS.

murr wrote:
'm not disagreeing with the "center to center" movement, just pointing out that it's really not that clearly stated in the rules,


It's not stated at all in the rule book. While I, like the rest of you it seems, choose to play orthogonal movement only there is nothing in the rules which requires this.

There is no need to worry about centre to centre movement, that seems awfully over the top for such an other wise easy to learn game, even in light of my treatment above. In through one side of a hex, out through the opposite. Much, much easier.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Randall Bart
United States
Winnetka
California
flag msg tools
designer
Baseball been bery bery good to me
badge
This is a picture of a published game designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
blaecblaed wrote:
That is why we have access to and should use the word "orthogonal".

I would avoid using "orthogonal" for hexagons.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Forrest Evans
United States
Goleta
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Barticus88 wrote:
blaecblaed wrote:
That is why we have access to and should use the word "orthogonal".

I would avoid using "orthogonal" for hexagons.


Just curious, why?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jonathan Chaffer
United States
Grand Rapids
Michigan
flag msg tools
designer
Grand Rapids Area Boardgamers
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
While the directions are orthogonal to the sides of the hexagons, they are not orthogonal to each other. There is a technical sense in which it is correct, but the mainstream use of "orthogonal" in board games is "horizontal and vertical." Any other use, even if correct, invites confusion.
2 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.