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Subject: Speed Painting Tutorial: Maniac rss

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Introduction: I painted the monsters about a year ago (black craft paint, followed by metallic color drybrushing), but found the "monstrous humans" more difficult to paint at the time. Thanks to washes and inks, I was able to speed paint the maniac miniatures, and thought to write up this tutorial. I find the water-like consistency of pre-made washes and inks *much* easier to control than paints, giving you time for the more difficult parts of the miniature. The Liquitex Essential Inks six-color set costs $24 from DickBlick. You can substitute white paint, although I would recommend inks for anyone who's had some painting experience.

Supplies used:
* Jeweler's engraving pen: $10.
* Secret Wash Dark Sepia (brown wash), and Dried Blood: $3 each.
* Reaper Tanned Skin and Tanned Shadow: $3 each.
* Liquitex White Ink: Part of a $24 six-ink set from DickBlick. Can use white paint instead.

Mold lines: Mold lines are the excess plastic on a miniature that seeps between the molds used to make the miniature. I used a hobby knife, files, and jeweler's engraver to remove mold lines. A jeweler's engraver is a handheld "drill" with an industrial diamond tip, and can be found at craft stores for under $10. The tip rotates, allowing you to file off mold lines more easily. After removing the mold lines, clean the miniature with soap and water, to remove mold release, an oil used to allow the miniature to be ejected from its mold easily.

Zenithal priming: The next step in miniature painting is priming. Primer allows the paint to better stick to the model, and any hardware store paint primer that says its usable with plastic will work. Most painters prime in white, black or grey. In zenithal priming, you completely spray the model in black, spray less completely in grey, then spray lightly in white. Shake the primer can thoroughly, prime the can with a brief burst before priming, start a few inches to the side of the miniatures, and spray with sweeps. For grey and white, check the miniature that the black layer is still visible. The black primer acts as a shade, while the white surface make highlighted surfaces brighter for painting. Zenithal priming doesn't take much more effort than priming, and can enhance and speed up your painting.

Clips: Since MoM figures have pegs, hold them with alligator clips or binder clips. When painting, hold the miniature by the clip and do not touch the miniature. In the picture, the clips are sticky-tacked to the paint points.



Zenithal priming and flesh painted.


Next post: Painting flesh!
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Washing with Brown: Before painting, especially for evil monsters with bad hygiene, I like to further emphasize shadows and details with a brown wash. Paint the shadows in the recesses, rather than a "slop and glop" application. For this miniature, I experimented with Secret Weapon Dark Sepia. SW has a range of brown washes, so their Sewer Water and Baby Poop should work, too. I also tried coloring in the axe handle, hair, and shoes with the brown wash; I would later need to continue painting these areas. You can also apply wash between coats of paint, to further emphasize shadows. (I think I washed only the flesh area with brown, painted the flesh, then washed the rest of the figure in brown.)

Flesh: I experimented with a range of flesh colors (including mixing Liquitex acrylic inks, and Reaper's Rose Skin), but went with Reaper's Tanned Shadow, then Tanned Flesh. Reaper paints have flow improver, so I used them without thinning. This allowed me to also paint the raised areas of the miniature, such as the fingers on the figure, with "thin coats of thicker paint".

Eyes: I used a red Prismacolor brush-tipped pen to color in the eyes. I find using brush-tips easier than paints, although I don't use them often.


Closer picture of figure washed in brown then painted flesh.


Next post: Shirts!
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Shirts: I painted the shirts with thin layers of white Liquitex Ink, careful to avoid ink in the shaded recesses. I find inks easier to use than paints, because thinned paints require more layers to deposit their color, and can run into the recesses. White paint should also work.



Shirts painted with thin layers of white ink.


Jeans: For a jeans color, I highly recommend Secret Weapon Sapphire. I also tried their Blue, but it was on the bright side, so I toned it down with Sapphire.



Jeans washes with Secret Weapon Sapphire (left), and Blue followed by Sapphire (right).


Next: Blood!
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Axe head: I find Reaper's Shadowed Steel shade color to be a better basecoat color than its Honed Steel basecoat color. After applying the Shadowed Steel, I used the side of my brush to sparingly paint the edges of the axe head with Polished Steel. I find flat blades and swords difficult to paint interestingly because they're flat. Blood sort of breaks the monotony, as would advanced metal painting techniques.

Axe handle and Shoes: Reaper's Ruddy Leather. If you're not so lazy, paint each brown item a different color of brown for better variety.

Blood on Axe: I pooled some Secret Weapon Dried Blood wash at the cutting edge of the axe, let it dry, then, with a frayed brush, pulled some of the blood away from the pooled area onto the rest of the axe head. This might take a few attempts, but can be easily painted over with the Shadowed Steel paint.

Blood on Shirt: A very different technique, I flicked Dried Blood from the brush onto the shirt with the frayed brush. You may wish to wick the brush first, erring on the side of fewer smaller droplets, rather than risking an unrealistic blotch of paint. You can try this by holding the miniature below the brush. I held the miniature below the table edge, then hit the brush along the ferrule on the side of the desk.



Final miniature on base.


Up close, the miniature still could have more work done on it, but, on the base and the table, it should be just fine for playing!
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