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Subject: How The Cost Of College Went From Affordable To Sky-High rss

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http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/290868013/how-the-cost-of-coll...

... But a turning point arrived around 1970. With double-digit inflation, an oil embargo and a sputtering economy, a perfect storm began to build. College tuition and fees climbed as much or more than the inflation rate. Private loans, heavily subsidized by the federal government, gradually replaced federal grants as the main source of money for both poor and middle-class college students.

As family income fell, borrowing to pay for college took off, while public investment in higher education dropped.



Ronald Reagan famously said, "The nine most terrifying words in the English language are 'I'm from the government, and I'm here to help.'"

In at least this one case, I think he was dead wrong. College or other post-high school study is essential now to get a decent job. As college costs rise, it will only add to the income gap between rich and poor.

Also, dumb. The post-WWII GI Bill paid for itself 4X over, because those grads went onto pay back much more in taxes than they would have with lower paying jobs.

Germany and other countries provides free college to their citizens. Great idea, I think.
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tesuji wrote:
http://www.npr.org/2014/03/18/290868013/how-the-cost-of-coll...

[i]... But a turning point arrived around 1970. With double-digit inflation, an oil embargo and a sputtering economy, a perfect storm began to build.


Huh. The "early" 1970's? Wrong. Most of this stuff didn't even begin until late 1973, almost 1974 and the double-digit stuff was well into Carter's term. I personally peg the "start" of 6 bad years at the moment Gerald Ford announced his "WIN" campaign and urged everybody wear plastic WIN buttons. That was just the beginning and Ford was gone soon.

I figure a bunch of the banks paid enough congressmen off to do the dirty deed of letting the banks make loans guaranteed by taxpayers that allowed them to collect interest for 15-30 years on a target rich market that included humans not yet even born. Talk about setting up a sweet deal for retirement. It's a scam, not the result of some shitty politics by a couple of useless presidents or waiting in line to buy gasoline on your assigned day.
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I agree mostly, but I also think that we have far too many people going to college. We should be tracking those most-suited to college and giving the rest a skill they can earn a living at by the time they exit the K-12 age range. We have some ridiculous percentage (over 80% I think) that attempt or start college with most dropping out at some point. The important question I think we need to answer is: how many college-educated people do we actually need (eg what percentage of the workforce)? Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.
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pdoherty wrote:
Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


That'll be a hard sell to a lot of the kids getting out of high school. Sure, you can make decent money with a lot of Trades and live mostly comfortably, but our society/culture pushes the "American Dream" from an early age and the Trades aren't going to take you there for the most part. I don't know how we reset expectations that having a small house, a practical vehicle and a limited number of possessions is an admirable and respectable state. It seems to me that many people accept such a level of "success" out of necessity, not as a life goal.

What you are suggesting is sort of a centrally "managed" career system. For better or worse, our current system does let kids find their own way to what they can succeed at. Sure it's inefficient and causes lots of stress on the way, but I think we should work to get the exploiters out of the system instead of replacing it. A managed system is just asking for trouble. Look what our justice system does with the poor now, throwing a career system on them that directs most young minorities to things like ditch digging sure isn't going to help the problem. Yeah, I realize in a perfect system that you would actually catch a lot of kids that fall through the cracks of the existing system, but I don't have a lot of confidence that we could implement the perfect system. I don't really want the responsibility (as part of the state) to set a kids future in stone and get it wrong.
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pdoherty wrote:
The important question I think we need to answer is: how many college-educated people do we actually need (eg what percentage of the workforce)?


This is a question that can only be sensibly answered for some specific fields. E.g., how many engineers do you need. The usefulness of general college education and estimates on how much it is 'needed' is difficult even for general subjects that are undeniably very useful (e.g. maths).

Otherwise, you can really only tell by the value placed on people by the job market. And generally, the job-market values college-educated more than non-college educated. Arguably this is a failure of the market to properly value things.

One way to fix this this would be to partition off the college part of the education system to certain people (hopefully by ability), as you suggest. That's removing a lot of choice from the students though.
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In my experience, usually the people doing studies in things likes 'folk art of Argentina' are perfectly aware this isn't going to end up with a multi-million pound a year career open to them.

Rather, it's those doing subjects like business studies or similar (as opposed to economics) who expect far more from their, neither uncommon nor especially well-thought of, degrees than they are going to get.
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Drew1365 wrote:
That's not actually true. Trades can get you there faster and with less debt (perhaps none at all).


I do agree that a Trade does make you self-sufficient faster and with far less debt. I also think it plateaus lower than what people's expectations are satisfied by. For better or worse, we are still plagued by the "You can be rich if you work really hard" meme, and people expect that you have to be a captain of industry/business to get there and that requires college. All roads to riches go through the forest of college, or so we have been led to believe. Sure, you can be a carpenter, grind for a few years, start your own contracting business and be very successful. But not every carpenter can do that. If we set up a system that uses a Sorting Hat to force you on a certain path, you will blame it on your failure to get into the suburbs with a nice house and a BMW.

I think that career path choices (at least in the U.S.) are rife with unrealistic expectations, unreasonable entitlement mentalities and inaccurate perceptions. The perceptions of the Trades and the lifestyles they offer are one of them. I can stomach a lower-middle class existence no problem because I am not that keyed into material success, but others aren't so inclined, either from natural inclination or cultural programming.
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I went to a public university to get a four year degree and came out with about the equivalent of a car loan for a new truck. Don't send your kids to private schools and don't let them major in pointless subjects and college becomes a good investment.
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TheChin! wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


That'll be a hard sell to a lot of the kids getting out of high school. Sure, you can make decent money with a lot of Trades and live mostly comfortably, but our society/culture pushes the "American Dream" from an early age and the Trades aren't going to take you there for the most part. I don't know how we reset expectations that having a small house, a practical vehicle and a limited number of possessions is an admirable and respectable state. It seems to me that many people accept such a level of "success" out of necessity, not as a life goal.

What you are suggesting is sort of a centrally "managed" career system. For better or worse, our current system does let kids find their own way to what they can succeed at. Sure it's inefficient and causes lots of stress on the way, but I think we should work to get the exploiters out of the system instead of replacing it. A managed system is just asking for trouble. Look what our justice system does with the poor now, throwing a career system on them that directs most young minorities to things like ditch digging sure isn't going to help the problem. Yeah, I realize in a perfect system that you would actually catch a lot of kids that fall through the cracks of the existing system, but I don't have a lot of confidence that we could implement the perfect system. I don't really want the responsibility (as part of the state) to set a kids future in stone and get it wrong.


Holy shit, I agree with The Chin! It is not the place of the state to tell you what you are going to do with your life. That's nuts. This is exactly where nonsense like Common Core is headed and it will result in a loss of choice for children. Do you want your child funneled into some program base on some standardized testing? It also gives schools and teachers way too much power. Have you ever had a disagreement with one of your kids teachers? What if he/she was to decide the fate of your kid?

No thanks. You should be able to chose your own path. Yeah, it can be messy, but we are certainly better for it. That's why people come to this country.
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Drew1365 wrote:
I don't know that a four-year university degree is important to getting a decent job. There are a lot of decent jobs that don't require it.

It certainly helps a lot, depending on the field.

But that's beside the point. There aren't even enough jobs for everyone, never mind decent jobs. That's why a lower percentage of people are actually working today, regardless of the official unemployment numbers.

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Colleges are like scam artists: "Here's your Doctorate in folk art of Argentina! Give us all your money for the next 50 years."

What makes a "doctorate in folk art of Argentina" more of a scam than any of the degrees required to, for example, land a job in middle management? You don't need to know anything about the economy if your job is to manage office staff. Better learn to cook good coffee instead. The good Argentine folk art doctor is likely to end up waiting tables in some restaurant, but does that job fill any higher purpose?

Our current education system resulted out of the realities of an industrial economy; where the masses are "mindless" workers and a few educated people watch over them.

Now that the traditional worker jobs are largely gone, of course everyone is flocking to the colleges. Where else are they supposed to go? There are only so many clogged toilets that need plumbing. Sure, higher education is a pointless endeavour if the only vacancies are waiter/waitress at a franchise restaurant, but should we really blame the people for having aspirations?

The point is, the majority of people in a post-industrial economy are necessarily going to end up in pointless jobs. And if the job is pointless anyway, I'd rather want people to have some fun doing it, with or without college education. Maybe then people will stop being so miserable and ridiculing one another for having an interest in the folk art of Argentina.
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bjlillo wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
I agree mostly, but I also think that we have far too many people going to college. We should be tracking those most-suited to college and giving the rest a skill they can earn a living at by the time they exit the K-12 age range. We have some ridiculous percentage (over 80% I think) that attempt or start college with most dropping out at some point. The important question I think we need to answer is: how many college-educated people do we actually need (eg what percentage of the workforce)? Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


Yes, and then we could give everyone their government-mandated job in their appropriate profession upon graduation. Centralized planning of our workforce sounds like a great idea!!


In high school we got some kind of report based on our standardized test scores that was supposed to help recommend a career to you. Whatever idiot put together that test suggested that I might enjoy a career in law enforcement.

I think our system is far from perfect, and there's no doubt that college tuition needs to be reined in, but the idea of tracking students into career paths is completely repulsive to me.
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I've been told that colleges overbuilt and overdid everything after the Baby Boom generation and the GI bill. They needed to get non-college caliber people to attend college. That's not a terrible idea up to a certain percentage, but statistically not everyone is going to be -- above average.

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...other countries provides free college to their citizens. Great idea, I think.


Health care and college rapidly outpace inflation like nothing else because the government refuses to stay away.

"If you think health care college is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free." -- P. J. O'Rourke
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sikeospi wrote:
Health care and college rapidly outpace inflation like nothing else because the government refuses to stay away.

"If you think health care college is expensive now, wait until you see what it costs when it's free." -- P. J. O'Rourke


Do you think college is less expensive in places with less of a government approach and more of a free market approach to higher education?
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The increase in tuition came about as a concomitant result of the cultural shift in the US that has made it so that everyone needs to go to college in order to get a decent job. University previously was for specialized jobs needed academic background and grad school was for work specifically in academia itself. This has been compounded as the quality of a US high school education has gone down and increasingly the first two years of university for many students fills the gap.

University was previously for the professional class of jobs-- clergy, doctors, lawyers, teachers, professors, etc. Of course the level of background needed has increased with technology but no so much that everyone objectively need to go to college; subjectively since employers have the perception that people must go to college and won't hire people who didn't, it becomes self-fulfilling.

Given that, I think US voters when the economy recovers enough need to seriously consider making undergraduate studies, i.e., college, part of the publicly funded education system for exactly the same reasons grades K-12 are. If US society is going to treat college as basic education needed to function in society, then it needs to follow through with the practical consequences. Otherwise, it needs to come up with an alternative to college.
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TheChin! wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


That'll be a hard sell to a lot of the kids getting out of high school. Sure, you can make decent money with a lot of Trades and live mostly comfortably, but our society/culture pushes the "American Dream" from an early age and the Trades aren't going to take you there for the most part. I don't know how we reset expectations that having a small house, a practical vehicle and a limited number of possessions is an admirable and respectable state. It seems to me that many people accept such a level of "success" out of necessity, not as a life goal.

What you are suggesting is sort of a centrally "managed" career system. For better or worse, our current system does let kids find their own way to what they can succeed at. Sure it's inefficient and causes lots of stress on the way, but I think we should work to get the exploiters out of the system instead of replacing it. A managed system is just asking for trouble. Look what our justice system does with the poor now, throwing a career system on them that directs most young minorities to things like ditch digging sure isn't going to help the problem. Yeah, I realize in a perfect system that you would actually catch a lot of kids that fall through the cracks of the existing system, but I don't have a lot of confidence that we could implement the perfect system. I don't really want the responsibility (as part of the state) to set a kids future in stone and get it wrong.


Yes, it's a hard sell, but there's nothing preventing kids who've been tracked to a trade from changing course after public education is done and getting a GED and going to college. It's just that most of those tracked this way would not end up as college graduates in any event so why force them to stay in high school, dragging down the curriculum, causing disruptions and basically wasting their and everyone else's time?
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TheChin! wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


What you are suggesting is sort of a centrally "managed" career system. For better or worse, our current system does let kids find their own way to what they can succeed at. Sure it's inefficient and causes lots of stress on the way, but I think we should work to get the exploiters out of the system instead of replacing it. A managed system is just asking for trouble. Look what our justice system does with the poor now, throwing a career system on them that directs most young minorities to things like ditch digging sure isn't going to help the problem. Yeah, I realize in a perfect system that you would actually catch a lot of kids that fall through the cracks of the existing system, but I don't have a lot of confidence that we could implement the perfect system. I don't really want the responsibility (as part of the state) to set a kids future in stone and get it wrong.


What we have now is a system whereby kids are guaranteed a spot in K-12 no matter how little effort they put into it, and then they come out to nothing but competition like a slap to the face. My idea is also beneficial because it introduces an aspect of competition (for the college-bound spots) and thus is a better reflection of the reality kids will face and will motivate them and their parents to be more interested in how their kids perform in school.
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dynamiteboy80 wrote:
TheChin! wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


That'll be a hard sell to a lot of the kids getting out of high school. Sure, you can make decent money with a lot of Trades and live mostly comfortably, but our society/culture pushes the "American Dream" from an early age and the Trades aren't going to take you there for the most part. I don't know how we reset expectations that having a small house, a practical vehicle and a limited number of possessions is an admirable and respectable state. It seems to me that many people accept such a level of "success" out of necessity, not as a life goal.

What you are suggesting is sort of a centrally "managed" career system. For better or worse, our current system does let kids find their own way to what they can succeed at. Sure it's inefficient and causes lots of stress on the way, but I think we should work to get the exploiters out of the system instead of replacing it. A managed system is just asking for trouble. Look what our justice system does with the poor now, throwing a career system on them that directs most young minorities to things like ditch digging sure isn't going to help the problem. Yeah, I realize in a perfect system that you would actually catch a lot of kids that fall through the cracks of the existing system, but I don't have a lot of confidence that we could implement the perfect system. I don't really want the responsibility (as part of the state) to set a kids future in stone and get it wrong.


Holy shit, I agree with The Chin! It is not the place of the state to tell you what you are going to do with your life. That's nuts. This is exactly where nonsense like Common Core is headed and it will result in a loss of choice for children. Do you want your child funneled into some program base on some standardized testing? It also gives schools and teachers way too much power. Have you ever had a disagreement with one of your kids teachers? What if he/she was to decide the fate of your kid?

No thanks. You should be able to chose your own path. Yeah, it can be messy, but we are certainly better for it. That's why people come to this country.


No one is telling the kids what to do with their lives; this plan injects competition (Americans supposedly like this, right?) into school instead of the typical apathy a guaranteed spot has created. Even those kids tracked to a trade have the choice of trades to pick from. It's publicly-funded mentoring/apprenticeship. Even if they decide to do something else after high school is done they'll still have an option they can fall back on, unlike today when those who aren't academically-inclined graduate high school with the choice of McDonalds or slinging crack (slightly facetious but I think you get my point). Removing them from the high school also will allow those who belong there to flourish - curriculum standards will be higher and those graduating from high school will truly be ready for college-level work. This also could have the result of lowering college tuition as there won't be nearly as high of a demand for it as there is today (more competition by schools for fewer students).
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bjlillo wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
I agree mostly, but I also think that we have far too many people going to college. We should be tracking those most-suited to college and giving the rest a skill they can earn a living at by the time they exit the K-12 age range. We have some ridiculous percentage (over 80% I think) that attempt or start college with most dropping out at some point. The important question I think we need to answer is: how many college-educated people do we actually need (eg what percentage of the workforce)? Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


Yes, and then we could give everyone their government-mandated job in their appropriate profession upon graduation. Centralized planning of our workforce sounds like a great idea!!


You're happy forcing academically-disinclined students to remain in high school even though they'll "graduate" knowing nothing, having no job skills, and their presence will have further watered-down the curriculum (so if they attempt they can pass with a minimum of effort)?

Why not give them the option to learn a skill they can earn a decent living at, even if they decide after high school to do something else (like go to college)?
 
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djgutierrez77 wrote:
bjlillo wrote:
pdoherty wrote:
I agree mostly, but I also think that we have far too many people going to college. We should be tracking those most-suited to college and giving the rest a skill they can earn a living at by the time they exit the K-12 age range. We have some ridiculous percentage (over 80% I think) that attempt or start college with most dropping out at some point. The important question I think we need to answer is: how many college-educated people do we actually need (eg what percentage of the workforce)? Once we know that we should track roughly that percentage of students after 8th grade into either college prep (high school) with the rest apprenticed in a trade that's in demand (carpentry, plumbing, nursing, etc). The fields for the trades offered could be negotiated with local industries every few years to ensure the graduates reflect the skills in demand.


Yes, and then we could give everyone their government-mandated job in their appropriate profession upon graduation. Centralized planning of our workforce sounds like a great idea!!


In high school we got some kind of report based on our standardized test scores that was supposed to help recommend a career to you. Whatever idiot put together that test suggested that I might enjoy a career in law enforcement.

I think our system is far from perfect, and there's no doubt that college tuition needs to be reined in, but the idea of tracking students into career paths is completely repulsive to me.


Why is that? You prefer to water down high school so it's meaningless, making ever more people need to obtain college degrees (which in turn are being watered-down so more people can pass)? Some people are not academically-inclined and will end up in these trades anyway, so why not help them along and have them graduate at 18 with skills they can live off of? My wife works for a plumbing company and they can't find plumbers to save their lives. They keep one guy even though he's a complete drama queen because they simply can't find any other journeyman-level plumbers to replace him.

Other countries seem to like the tracked system just fine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_education_system#Problems_...

Quote:
A dual education system combines apprenticeships in a company and vocational education at a vocational school in one course. This system is practiced in several countries, notably Germany, Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Serbia, Slovenia, Macedonia, Montenegro and Switzerland, but also Denmark, the Netherlands and France, and for some years now in China and other countries in Asia.


Quote:
Apprenticeship section

As one part of the dual education course, students are trained in a company for three to five days a week. The company is responsible for ensuring that students get the standard quantity and quality of training set down in the training descriptions for each trade.

In Germany, this practical training may be complemented by more practical lessons at workshops run by the guilds and chamber of commerce, in order to compensate for the bias caused by training at only one company. These extra courses usually take three or four weeks a year. The time spent at vocational school is approximately 60 days a year, in blocks of one or two weeks at a time spread out over the year.

In France, the same amount of time is spent in practical training and theory, with the following possible systems:

2.5 days in a company, 2.5 days at school,
one week in a company, one week at school,
six months in a company, six months at school.

French companies must provide a tutor or other person responsible for the students, or a human resources officer to deal with them. Their duties may involve daily tutoring and/or targeted training. French apprentices on the dual education course are paid a certain percentage of the minimum wage for the job they are learning.
School section

The other part of the dual education course involves lessons at a vocational school (German: Berufsschule). The responsibility for this part of the course lies with the school authorities in every German state or Swiss canton. Both general lessons ( for example German, politics, economics, religion or even sport) and trade-specific theory are taught.

Lessons may be taught part-time (one or two days a week) or in blocks of several weeks. The latter is preferred for trades learned by only a small number of students, where students may have to travel long distances to get to the nearest vocational school which teaches their subject.

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whac3 wrote:
The increase in tuition came about as a concomitant result of the cultural shift in the US that has made it so that everyone needs to go to college in order to get a decent job.


And now companies are shipping those jobs overseas as fast as they can to the BRIC countries. And yet people in this thread still believe that we need all these college graduates? What jobs will they be doing?
 
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whac3 wrote:
The increase in tuition came about as a concomitant result of the cultural shift in the US that has made it so that everyone needs to go to college in order to get a decent job. University previously was for specialized jobs needed academic background and grad school was for work specifically in academia itself. This has been compounded as the quality of a US high school education has gone down and increasingly the first two years of university for many students fills the gap.

University was previously for the professional class of jobs-- clergy, doctors, lawyers, teachers, professors, etc. Of course the level of background needed has increased with technology but no so much that everyone objectively need to go to college; subjectively since employers have the perception that people must go to college and won't hire people who didn't, it becomes self-fulfilling.

Given that, I think US voters when the economy recovers enough need to seriously consider making undergraduate studies, i.e., college, part of the publicly funded education system for exactly the same reasons grades K-12 are. If US society is going to treat college as basic education needed to function in society, then it needs to follow through with the practical consequences. Otherwise, it needs to come up with an alternative to college.


I agree with public funding of college, but not making it mandatory; that would just mean even more years wasted for youths who will end up in trades that don't need it.
 
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I pointedly did not suggest making it mandatory.

Ideally the US should open up technical and vocational schools which offer a level of education comparable to universities, something along the line of the German Fachhochschule.
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pdoherty wrote:

Yes, it's a hard sell, but there's nothing preventing kids who've been tracked to a trade from changing course after public education is done and getting a GED and going to college. It's just that most of those tracked this way would not end up as college graduates in any event so why force them to stay in high school, dragging down the curriculum, causing disruptions and basically wasting their and everyone else's time?


In theory, I can see a scenario where an evaluation process could suggest various aptitudes for a child and the parents would be apprised that state-assisted education would subsidize these paths for this child and if they want to choose a different path, then they have to kick in more money. That is purely theoretical because I don't have confidence that we currently understand ourselves as human beings or the effects of nature and nurture enough to create an accurate sorting system. Voluntary vocational alternatives to high school are great and exist in many areas, non-voluntary is very susceptible to human error. Irrevocable error with long term consequences.
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I’m thinking that we are about to see a major shift in education. In just a few seconds, from the comfort of my laptop, I have gained free access to MIT Opencourseware, including lectures on calculus, physics and chemistry. From MIT. There is also Khan Academy, Wikipedia—the trend seems to be towards open education. The notion that one must pay for access to information is grossly outdated for us here in the information age.

Couple that with the lie that a well-rounded education is necessary for being successful spells doom for the current educational framework.

Let me explain. I worked as a tutor and SI leader at college for mathematics and chemistry courses. Most of the people I saw seriously struggle with these topics were returning adults, many of them were intelligent and highly motivated people. But having been out of high school for so long, they lacked the basic skills to succeed in academia because decades of real life work experiences rarely made use of the quadratic formula or the ideal gas law. There was no indication that mastery of these topics would offer any benefit for their future career goals and yet these were basic requirements for all students. Why? Nothing is to be gained by this requirement but money for the university and frustrated students.

What I see happening is a shift to more on-job training and the acceptance of multiple pathways for gaining just the knowledge that is necessary for getting the job done right. If one also wishes to broaden one’s horizons the resources are certainly out there for a person to pick and choose from.
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spookyblast wrote:
I’m thinking that we are about to see a major shift in education. In just a few seconds, from the comfort of my laptop, I have gained free access to MIT Opencourseware, including lectures on calculus, physics and chemistry. From MIT. There is also Khan Academy, Wikipedia—the trend seems to be towards open education. The notion that one must pay for access to information is grossly outdated for us here in the information age.

Couple that with the lie that a well-rounded education is necessary for being successful spells doom for the current educational framework.



What will keep the professors working on the course materials if there isn't any money being made off of the courses? How does the school generate tuition if the course materials are free? Schools like MIT and Stanford have started releasing some of their courses for free, but they aren't going to give up their entire course catalog.
 
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