Jason Gough
United States
Lockport
New York
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I am trying to learn as much as I can about the Kickstarter experience as possible prior to launching a project.

My current question is now the importance, pros, and cons of having a print and play pledge level.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Gregg Jewell
United States
Florida
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmb
I think it's pretty invaluable, along with the $1 pledge.

It allows the people that are interested but not quite committed to the full game to try it out themselves and potentially up their pledge.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bart R.
Belgium
Tongeren
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I personally don't care much for a PnP version, I just don't have the time to be printing and cutting out an entire game. A good video showing gameplay and components goes a lot further in convincing me to throw money your way .

That being said, there are many paths to victory (i.e. funding) and a PnP version is definitely one of them.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim
United States
San Antonio
Texas
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think it's a show of faith on the designer's part that the game is complete, and plays well enough that they're comfortable letting people try it. It shows that you have enough confidence in your game that you know people will want to buy it, even after a few plays.

I think they're like coupons though. Something like 1% of people (just pulling that number out of my arse, but that's where all statistics come from, really) will actually go to the trouble to print it and play it. Most people won't bother, but I think they will be swayed by knowing they *could*. It's like coupons. If everyone redeemed their coupons, it wouldn't be financially feasible for companies to offer them. But they gamble that only X% will be redeemed.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
DesignMachine Games
United States
Minneapolis
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
Avatar
mbmbmb
There's a great article on this by Stonemaier Games:
http://stonemaiergames.com/kickstarter-lesson-67-video-print...
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jake Staines
United Kingdom
Grantham
Lincolnshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
JewellGames wrote:

It allows the people that are interested but not quite committed to the full game to try it out themselves and potentially up their pledge.


On top of that, there have been several games that I've pledged for just to get the PnP version of - I wouldn't have ever considered the produced version of the game, but I was happy to pay a little to get the files, so it gets the project a bit more funding for basically no cost.

As another benefit, PnP files can also help defray delivery times and any production problems you may have. For example: Ruse would have frustrated me, since it took them something ridiculous like a year and a half to produce a game which is fundamentally just a deck of cards... but since they'd provided PnP files early on, I could play the game I'd helped fund in the meantime, and I didn't feel so bad.

I really like to see PnP files available for a game, even if I don't plan to build it myself - it shows faith in the design, and it's a really nice gesture to the backers who made the game possible - it makes the project feel more like a community-push thing than the preorder thing that a lot of KS backers and a lot of KS creators treat the site like.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clwe
United Kingdom
Essex
flag msg tools
If you're Kickstarting a card game (or a game mostly consisting of cards), overseas backers will thank you for a PnP option particularly if you can't reduce shipping charges much outside of the US. As an example, I would not back a small-ish game played predominantly with cards if the overseas shipping was more than, say, $10. I would happily plunk down money for a PnP version, though.

With bigger board games (i.e. those with a board, cards, other bits and pieces) I'm much more willing to pay higher postage overseas. But it's hard to justify $25-$40 postage for a small one that could easily be done in PnP format. So, you might also wnat to think about your overseas backers (even if we do tend to be in the minority on kickstarter).
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Rob Harper
United Kingdom
Wantage
Oxfordshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Even if I don't want to build a print & play set, having it available means that I can read the rules and look at the components (even if they aren't as nice as the final version) so I can get a really good idea of what I'm buying into. It also gives me some confidence that the producer is confident in their game as they are willing to be open about what they actually have.

I am definitely far more likely to back a game that is available as P&P.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Aitor
Spain
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
-If you live in another country, a PnP version saves you the worries of having your game stopped in customs or even lost by the courier.

-For those who like to pimp up our games with aids, translate the components for our (non-english speaking) gaming group, or make custom new content, a PnP provides us with the source graphics. We don't need to lose time and graphic quality scanning the game. The PnP format has much more customizable potential than the two or three blank cards that come with physically published games.

-If you get a digital PnP backup, you can easily make your own replacements for damaged or lost pieces, even for the physical version of the game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Celina
United States
University City
MO
flag msg tools
Avatar
mb
One thing that having PnP files out there before the game is released is that each PnP set equals people who play the game, write reviews, and can teach it when the game comes out.

Case in point:

I got a PnP copy of Scoville from my Secret Santa. I've played it with 3 different groups. 2 of those groups included people in my game group who usually teach games. I'm taking this copy to our local convention & sticking it in the library for 4 days.

If you DO provide PnP files, please set them up so they can be printed easily. That means checking the margins in .pdf files so they match on both sides, cut marks, and clear directions as to how many of each thing are needed.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nat Levan
United States
Glenside
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Hast ye seen the White Whale?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I think it's a great idea, because it gives people another option.
Even consider providing a PnP for free, because people can see it, try it out, and share it, which creates more interest. It also helps you catch anything you missed in the rules. You'll bring in more people who are on the fence than you'll lose from making it available.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Christian Gienger
Germany
Germany
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Personally I don't consider backing a game without a free PnP available to try out the game. I most probably won't print the PnP, but I can look over it, I have rules and I know if the game will work for me.
I don't mind if it is a reduced PnP and without art, but it should be there, before backing, as should rules.
I don't care for PnP pledge levels as long as the levels are not too many and confusing.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Barry Kendall
United States
Lebanon
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I'd much rather have a good video demonstrating play with prototype components and clear descriptions of production components and gameplay than a p'np.

That said, I do like being able to read the rules, at least in draft form, before pulling the KS trigger.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.