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Subject: Best One Mapper rss

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Dave
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I've played Schevardino a few times and it's hard for the French to keep their heads above water before the reinforcements arrive.

My vote is for Utitsa. Well-matched from the beginning. Polish infantry, superior artillery and regular cavalry versus excellent Russian grenadiers and a swarm of Cossacks. Plenty of opportunities in the early turns to play most aspects of the rules.
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Dave
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Also, the Poles have room to deploy. Which the Russians should never give them in the whole battle scenario.
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Cam Platell
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I am currently playing through Shevardino a second time. I think this is a very interesting scenario. The Russians have a real advantage in artillery and heavy cavalry that is difficult for the French to overcome.

Looking forwards to playing Utitsa next.
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Dave
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Platell wrote:
I am currently playing through Shevardino a second time. I think this is a very interesting scenario. The Russians have a real advantage in artillery and heavy cavalry that is difficult for the French to overcome.

Looking forwards to playing Utitsa next.


Absolutely. The first French division has a tough time just surviving until the reinforcements come on.

Utitsa is much more evenly matched.
 
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Cam Platell
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I am reading Chandlers "The Campaigns of Napoleon" to try and understand how war was fought in this period. How would Napoleon approach an engagement like this?

With regards this scenario and the first French division, I was initially really unsure how to deploy it. Now I have the impression that it's true role is to engage as much of the Russian forces as possible. Spread their forces out. This then makes a subsequent outflanking maneuver more likely to succeed when the reserves arrive. It also allows the French to concentrate some of their reserves for a definitive breakthrough.

All in all a lot of fun and a good learning opportunity.
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Dave
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Platell wrote:
I am reading Chandlers "The Campaigns of Napoleon" to try and understand how war was fought in this period. How would Napoleon approach an engagement like this?

With regards this scenario and the first French division, I was initially really unsure how to deploy it. Now I have the impression that it's true role is to engage as much of the Russian forces as possible. Spread their forces out. This then makes a subsequent outflanking maneuver more likely to succeed when the reserves arrive. It also allows the French to concentrate some of their reserves for a definitive breakthrough.

All in all a lot of fun and a good learning opportunity.


I agree. It just has to live long enough for the flanking forces to arrive.

If it crosses the river and advances too far, it will be destroyed.

I usually cross with it and advance a few hexes past the river. If I can draw out the Russian grenadiers or cuirassiers, I'll fight the fight there. This gives plenty of room for crossing/flanking attempts elsewhere.

If they don't bite on the bait, I might advance the division more to create deployment space for the follow on forces. But keeping the flanks of the division anchored and secure is critical. If any of the Russian cavalry can safely get around a flank, the French are in deeeep trouble. gulp
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Terry Doherty
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For a better source on the tactics of the period check out something like George Nafziger's Imperial Bayonets. There are also several Osprey books that will give some basic understanding of the battalion maneuvers.
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Cam Platell
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Thank you for that. I will look it up.
 
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Patrick O'Halloran
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Besides the fine sources Terry mentions, another book that I've just enjoyed reading is "Tactics and the Experience of Battle in the Age of Napoleon" by Rory Muir. It is Anglo-centric, but does convey the experience of battle in the age. Another good read was "With Musket, Cannon & Sword" by Brent Nosworthy.
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Terry Doherty
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Those are good too. Another good one for the revolutionary period is John Lynn's Bayonets of the Republic.
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Antonio Carrasco
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For Borodino (La Moscowa) I heartily recommend Alexander Mikaberidze "The Battle of Borodino"; a good overview of the campaign in Dominic Lieven's "Russia against Napoleon". Both are written with the use of hundreds of Russian sources, which serves as a good balance to the French-centric narrative of Chandler.
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Cam Platell
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I have read both of these books and I agree with your comments. After reading "The battle of Borodino" I came away with the feeling that this was a titanic struggle that ended inconclusively for both sides.
 
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