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Subject: For the Elmer Fudd in you rss

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Michael Debije
Netherlands
Eindhoven
The Netherlands
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Wabbit’s Wevenge was designed by Mark Acres and published in 1986 by Pacesetter games. It is playable by 2-4 players in two or three hours.

What You Get

Inside the thin, fragile box with an amusing depiction of the title character busting down a door to confront the evildoers, you get a four-piece jigsaw map, sheets of 48 perforated cards, some chits, and two ten-sided dice. Why the board was not made to fold, I don’t know, but as in all jigsaw maps it does not stay very flat. The illustrations are colorful and lively and the regions clearly marked, with the nice consideration of writing the area names in two directions for ease of reading. The counters are brightly colored and monochrome, although green and blue are rather similar, but the illustrations are pretty good and the text reasonably easy to read. The cards are all illustrated in color with simpler drawings, but some kind of funny. Overall, it is a decently illustrated, but cheaper component game. The cards do not shuffle well due to the perforations, and they are pretty thin so be careful shuffling. Let’s say it is not going to get your group ‘oohing’ and ‘ahhing’.

What You Do

Each player assumed the role of a different character with different motivations. Wambo Wabbit and his sidekick, Tweet Thing the bird, is trying to save his ‘kin’, or family bunnies from being turned into fur coats, or, barring that, to give the coats a decent burial. Mr. McGreedy is trying to turn the said kin into coats and move them to his warehouse. Randy Andy the cat is trying to help gather the kin for coat making, but also scores for being around the very attractive Koo bird. Finally, Bernie the dog tries to move coats to his store where he can sell then to tourists for a tidy profit.

Character chits and various weapon counters, like trashcans, crowbars, automatic rifles and grenades, are placed on the map, three cards are dealt to each player and the game begins. In total, it covers 12 turns, with high score winning, scoring being by fulfilling your goals (for example, McGreedy gets 2 points every time a coat is moved to his warehouse) or by whomping other critters, a whomp being a successful attack.

A player turn starts by allowing discarding and redrawing to a hand of three, and then movement of each critter under their control. Each critter has a movement rate, all spaces counting one. Areas like the highway move you around quickly, but if you roll 10 or less on a 2d10, you are run over by traffic and have to drop all carried items and go back to the beginning location. At the end of movement, a character can make one attack, unless they did not move, and then they get 2 chances. Wambo is even tougher: he gets two or three attacks a turn! You can attack by hand or using a weapon you happen to have picked up. There are ranged weapons, like the grenade, vehicular weapons, like the tank which can aim at any space on the board, or simple hand-to-hand weapons which only work in the same space. 2d10 are rolled, modified by the weapon and attacking critter, and compared to the defense value of the defender: if the roll beats their defensive number, the character is ‘whomped’, removing him from the location, either to the discard (for non-player characters) or back to start. Once all characters for a player have moved, then the next player gets a turn.

At almost any time, cards can be played. This is rather unique, as far as I know, in that immediately after playing a card, you draw another and can use it right away. Thus, it is possible to cycle through six or seven card plays in one turn. Cards can be items, new characters to help you (like Granny, who costs 5 points to anyone who whomps her, Bongo the ape, Officer Bob the policeman, or the swift Wiley Rat, among others. You can also go to the post office to place a mail order and receive the following turn the tank, disintegrator ray, matter transducer and other nefarious objects. But watch out! You need to visit the post to pick up your package, which could be booby-trapped to explode by an opponent. That’s always fun. Other cards allow extra attacks or defense, a rocket skateboard for fast movement… there are a variety.

Koo stork brings extra kin on the board four times in the game, and McGreedy gets help from the bank guards during the final three rounds. You can also score by blowing up buildings, a fun pastime for Wambo. In the end, scores are tallied for the 121 turns and a winner declared. Pretty straightforward, in the basics.

What I Think


The game has a lot of little rules, and several buildings have special abilities, like the theatre, where you can hide and a potential attacker has to roll 11 or more on 2d10 because it is so dark inside to find you. The items have abilities, and sometime the text on the card does not match the rulebook. Several questions on play came up for which we did not have the answers. Can the turtle carry a kin into the lake? Is the matter teleporter an attack or not? Does the banana peel trip you if you begin a character in the space? All the lookups and discussion added time to the game.

And this was the largest drawback for me: for what it is, it went on about a half hour too long. Also, since many of the objects do not appear to regenerate (at least, not that I could find in the rules) near the end the fun stuff, like Wambo’s gun, are out of play, and we just have to roll hand-to-hand fighting. When one player has three or four characters, things bog down as they maneuver through their extended turn.

There are opportunities for clever play, and there are some laughs. I particularly like Gramma beating Tweet Thing over the head with a garbage bin lid. It is this atmosphere that has to carry the game, which is quite ordinary in other respects, although the card use is novel. But is the atmosphere gets strained by too long a play then the cracks appear. It is also quite random in many respects, and it is possible for a player to have little to do for much of the game, especially if they don’t draw any additional creatures.

Still, I like the ideas in there: the different player goals, ‘whomping’ that is not debilitating but encouraged, rapid and consistent card playing, the post office and general humor. Not the greatest game around, but if you grew up watching Looney Tunes, then this might be right what you are looking for to kill and evening. This game is actually the sequel to Wabbit Wampage, which actually feels more Looney Tunes-like than Wevenge, and for that I prefer the original, but if that is not available, Wevenge will fill that empty space in your soul.

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Darrell Hanning
United States
Jacksonville
Florida
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Sounds very similar to Pacesetter's Wabbit Wampage, from the year before this game came out. Slight re-theming - in the first game, the rabbit players were trying to collect carrots, while the farmer player(s) were trying to keep that from happening.
 
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Michael Debije
Netherlands
Eindhoven
The Netherlands
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DarrellKH wrote:
Sounds very similar to Pacesetter's Wabbit Wampage, from the year before this game came out. Slight re-theming - in the first game, the rabbit players were trying to collect carrots, while the farmer player(s) were trying to keep that from happening.


As I mentioned in the last paragraph, it was indeed a follow-up, but not quite as good with bringing out the theme as did Wampage.
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David Arlington
United States
Summerdale
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Thanks for the review! I was just cataloging my game collection and updating my BGG entries and of course, looking up some of them. When I saw this game had NO POSTS of any kind, I was kinda sad!

So good on you for writing this up!
Dave
 
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Robert Kingery
United States
Huntington Beach
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Thanks for the write up. I have the orignal game and just recently found out about this one. Another fun themed game from when I was a kid just discovering boardgames in the 80's.

Now I need to get my hands on a copy to add to my collection.
 
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