Recommend
 
 Thumb up
 Hide
19 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Board Game Design » Board Game Design

Subject: Playing card material rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Andrew Kluck
United States
Hudson
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm new here so I'm sorry if this is the wrong forum for this question.

Typical card stock makes very poor playing cards, it's too think or too thin and doesn't shuffle well. Where can I find better material, preferably with a large variety of colors?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nat Levan
United States
Glenside
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Hast ye seen the White Whale?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It depends what you're looking for. There isn't really a good way of getting exactly what you are looking for, but that means that the alternatives are well understood and generally accepted as the standard methods.

For prototyping, consider using cardstock or paper and cards in sleeves, it'll be cheaper to produce and easy to change.
There are several recommendations for how to make semi-professional looking cards at home, that usually involve gluing sheets together, which gives a better shuffle. Most professional cards also have a coating that makes them more durable and shuffle well

None of these steps are really necessary until you are submitting to publishers, and even then, most publishers won't care as long as it works well enough.

If you have a basically final game and are just looking to manufacture some copies, there are several good services. Ad Magic, Printer's Studio, ArtsCow, and The Game Crafter all have advocates here, and have various pros and cons. There are some good threads in this forum comparing them.

Hope this has been helpful.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David Sevier
United States
San Diego
California
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
For prototyping I use blank (unlined) index cards. You can get them cheap from office supply stores, and they're large enough that you can either do big cards with lots of room for edits or cut them in half for smaller cards.

A bit easier than dealing with sheets of cardstock, and while they're not ideal they do shuffle ok.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Carl Nyberg
Canada
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Cardstock works better for me because I print my cards all on one page. Sure, it's hard to shuffle, but you can be careful and it's only a prototype.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Galaad Maal
United Kingdom
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If it's a short print run, and you've got artwork why not check out something like artscow to print them for you? Way better quality than a home job.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Tu
South Africa
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
+1 for magic cards and CHEAP sleeves. They shuffle well, are DAMN EASY to produce whether you just line stuff up in Word and print (I use Illustrator but Word will do too for the Adobe uninitiated) or scribble on bits of paper.

Prototyping is about speed of getting to play.

my example:

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Tuism wrote:


Prototyping is about speed of getting to play.


Agreed, especially if it's just for playtesting.

Thing is, The OP doesn't mention why he wants to make cards.

So I looked up his other threads, and found this:
Blank playing cards
Sitnam wrote:
I'm testing out a new design and index cards aren't cutting it. Where can I order blank poker sized playing cards?

*Bonus points if I get choices for different backs.


That's from a year and a half ago. I'd guess he's still exploring a DIY avenue
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Kluck
United States
Hudson
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't ever intend to sell any of my designs, I'm really just looking to make the things I've created easier to handle. The one I'm currently working on has lots of cards Ticket To Ride size and they're difficult to shuffle. Card sleeves make them too thick and I don't have much storage space remaining in the container.

The decks of poker card I bought when I asked that question a year ago would work for preliminary testing, I'll just cut them in half. But I was wondering if there was a better solution.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian Carson
United States
Canton
Georgia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If you are looking for smaller blank cards you can pick some up cheap here:
http://www.makeplayingcards.com/design/blank-mini-cards-deck...

If you are looking to get them printed makeplayingcards.com is pretty cheap too, $8.00 for a deck.
http://www.makeplayingcards.com/design/design-mini-card-deck...

If you are looking for paper you can print and cut, try:
http://www.amazon.com/Sheets-Premium-11-5Mil-Office-Product/...

It is 300gsm paper, that is the same paper weight that is used for playing cards(mostly). I have not tried this paper myself but it is a reasonable price for 50 sheets.

Hope this helps.

-Ian
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sturv Tafvherd
United States
North Carolina
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Sitnam wrote:
I don't ever intend to sell any of my designs, I'm really just looking to make the things I've created easier to handle. The one I'm currently working on has lots of cards Ticket To Ride size and they're difficult to shuffle. Card sleeves make them too thick and I don't have much storage space remaining in the container.

The decks of poker card I bought when I asked that question a year ago would work for preliminary testing, I'll just cut them in half. But I was wondering if there was a better solution.


What I've done recently, when I'm looking to DIY a deck of cards:
-- grab some resume paper -- somewhat thicker than regular laser printer paper
-- print my cards using a laser color printer
-- my layout is such that when I fold the sheet in half, one side has card fronts and the other side has card backs
-- I spray glue and stick the two halves together.
-- cut the cards out

The resume paper tends to have better fiber, and these tend to be arranged such that the grain is a bit diagonal. Folding it in half and gluing the two together puts those grains somewhat against each other ... like crossbeams on a section of fencing. And that helps give it some springiness. Spray glue is important because it helps you avoid saturating the paper. For a similar reason, I don't want to use ink jet printers because it can make the paper too wet.


 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Wojciechowski
United States
Aurora
Illinois
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If you haven't seen this discussion, yet, I suggest you take a look.

Making Cards: You’ll never use your old method again.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Derek H
South Africa
Johannesburg
Gauteng
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Sitnam wrote:
The decks of poker card I bought when I asked that question a year ago would work for preliminary testing, I'll just cut them in half. But I was wondering if there was a better solution.

"Good, quick, cheap" - pick any two ... It really does depend on your criteria for "better". As many have suggested, the "good, quick" route is to get them printed by ArtsCow or the like.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Kluck
United States
Hudson
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
danwojciechowski wrote:
If you haven't seen this discussion, yet, I suggest you take a look.

Making Cards: You’ll never use your old method again.

Thank you, that's very useful.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Thomas Lajeunesse
France
Paris
Ile-de-France
flag msg tools
badge
Hihihi... Stop that, I'm ticklish !
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Tuism wrote:


I don't know about the material, but I LOVE the feeling of volume this design gives. Well done !
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Steven Tu
South Africa
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Duncan wrote:
Tuism wrote:


I don't know about the material, but I LOVE the feeling of volume this design gives. Well done !


Thanks! Am busy playtesting v3 of my game, Print and Play should be ready very shortly, if you're interested I'll link you, let me not derail this thread XD
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Cornixt
msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"Standard" cardstock seems to be about 50 lb, so you really want to be looking for something that is at least 100 lb.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nat Levan
United States
Glenside
Pennsylvania
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Hast ye seen the White Whale?
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
danwojciechowski wrote:
If you haven't seen this discussion, yet, I suggest you take a look.

Making Cards: You’ll never use your old method again.


This is one of the best resources for DIY.

There's also this video by Cheapass games
http://www.cheapass.com/node/150
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tim H
United States
Bristow
Virginia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
Admittedly, it's a very niche method, but if I need firm cards for whatever reason (I like to play around with card-laying mechanics, where you cover other player's cards up, so, fairly frequently) I actually use x-ray film. If you have access to any, if you know anybody who works in a research or diagnostic lab, we go through x-ray film like you wouldn't believe, you can ask them for it, and as long as there's no medical info on it, they will probably oblige.

Simply use your adhesive of choice, let it dry, if applicable, and cut with scissors. They shuffle brilliantly, and it's using something that would be thrown away anyway.

Alternatively, you could probably get away with using the backs of the boxes you buy your soda cans/cereal/pasta in.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Derek H
South Africa
Johannesburg
Gauteng
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fallorn wrote:
Alternatively, you could probably get away with using the backs of the boxes you buy your soda cans/cereal/pasta in.

Most of the pasta and soda I have seen comes wrapped in plastic... The days of "free cardboard" are rapidly coming to an end - DIY while the sun still shines!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.