Recommend
1 
 Thumb up
 Hide
7 Posts

Android: Netrunner» Forums » General

Subject: Overload rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Mr Juggles
United Kingdom
Prestatyn
Denbighshire
flag msg tools
The sweat in my t-shirt and dust in my shoes, reminds me that paradise is only a point of view.
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
So I got into boardgaming about a year ago and am therefore still very wet behind the ears and still finding my favorites games. A few months in I found A:NR and loved the idea, watched a few YouTube videos and with some extra cash bought the core set.
I kept dragging it out, trying to get my head into the game and play it, but without the real time and knowing that there weren’t many people about me I could play a few rounds with it almost felt fruitless. I did love the design, the feel, the idea and the asymmetry of the game so so on a whim I put on my Amazon wish list all the expansions like a bookmark for the next time I wanted to add to the core set. Come Christmas the family and friends have picked up on my active wish list and seeing as I also passed through a fathers day and a birthday I have all of the Genesis cycle expansions (about £12 seemed to be the sweet spot for people buying me gifts) and even the creation and control, and still no real clue how to play it.
Finally a friend from my local boardgaming group invited me around to teach me the game better, it turns out I knew more or less how to play it from all the times I read the rule book, but just needed to get the hands on experience. Then another person at the group who is newer than me went out and bought the core set and we've started getting together to play.
However, as I start to read around to get the feel for deck building and such like I find my head spinning. There are so many words being bantered about, even on the most basic of podcasts, that I feel overwhelmed. I even bookmarked a jargon page on here to try and catch up and follow more podcasts
http://boardgamegeek.com/blogpost/20340/the-jargon-of-netrun...
The question is
What do you think is the best way forward so I don't drown myself in too much information and lose the joy for the game I currently have?
Is it just a case of getting all the plays in and expect a natural learning curve to occur or is there anyway I can sit down with a deck of expansions and work out where they all work?
There are some excellent podcasts out there like the Bad Publicity one where it seems like they have a great feel for the game. But the familiarity with every single card and it's relevance to where it plays well makes me feel like I am stood at a very tall mountain I'm going to struggle to conquer.
Any ideas would be great, as I still love the game.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andrew Keddie
Wales
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
You're in an excellent position right now where you and a friend have both got the Core set, and nothing else. Make the most of it! Play loads with him, try out deckbuilding, try out every faction. When you both feel like you're ready, start expanding at a pace you feel comfortable with. You don't even need to get the same sets necessarily, if you think you're ok with just learning the cards as you see them come up (or looking at which cards come in which packs when you know what each other have bought).

I would say though that a bite-sized approach like this is going to be the best way to avoid being overwhelmed. Assuming you could even afford to do it, buying two whole Cycles and two Deluxe expasions is going to give you a total overload of new cards to try and learn.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Sebastian Zarzycki
Poland
Poznań
Wielkopolskie
flag msg tools
spiral out
badge
keep going
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just take it easy and enjoy. The game isn't going anywhere. It's complex, yes, and it takes time to learn all the intricacies and quirks. Just play the game. Chances are, you will play it wrong, over and over. It still happens even to people playing for a long time, when they all of sudden encounter a new combination or a situation. That's ok.

The best thing would be to have someone around who can correct you, someone you can refer to for proper rules resolving. It doesn't necessary have to be the same person you play with, because that might be a little daunting and given his/hers experience, he/she might be unable to deliver a game on "your level" (not because unwillingness or lack of social skill, but rather because of being stuffed with too much information one cannot easily get out of his/her head). It's good, when both people learn the game at similar pace and figure out certain interactons or combinations for the first time on their own.

Android: Netrunner communities tend to be very friendly, open and willing to help. Try to contact one, if you can, in your neighbourhood. They will be more than happy to assist you on your way and of course we here at BGG can always help, too.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Grish Noren
msg tools
Avatar
mbmb
My opinion: Find the original championship games from Team Covenant and watch those. There's less jargon and it'll be in the context of a youtube video where you're watching whats happening. At that point in the game there was less to know. It was literally the card pool you have now: genesis cycle & core.

Aside from that, there is a certain amount of knowledge you need to absorb when you play a game like this so that you can predict what might come up during a game. You might be absorbing it too quickly. Slow it down and listen to podcasts less, spend more time just playing with your buddy and messing with the cards on your own.

The only other strategy I can think of, and its the one I used was to net deck for about a month or two and vigorously consume internet content. Yeah, there's a lot there and you won't get all of it, but that's how I became more competitive in 6 months than some of the players in my area that had been playing since release.

That said, if you're not after that competitive edge, that tactic probably isn't for you.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nigel McNaughton
New Zealand
Wellington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
That's an interesting idea. I think I'll have to watch this later and see how things have changed!

2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmb
MrJuggles wrote:
Finally a friend from my local boardgaming group invited me around to teach me the game better, it turns out I knew more or less how to play it from all the times I read the rule book, but just needed to get the hands on experience.


Yes, that's usually the case I read through the rules like 9 times before finally sitting down to play. I learned more in 1 hour of play than I did thumbing through the rulebook (though getting a general overview from the rules is never a bad thing).

MrJuggles wrote:
However, as I start to read around to get the feel for deck building and such like I find my head spinning. There are so many words being bantered about, even on the most basic of podcasts, that I feel overwhelmed. I even bookmarked a jargon page on here to try and catch up and follow more podcasts
http://boardgamegeek.com/blogpost/20340/the-jargon-of-netrun...
The question is
What do you think is the best way forward so I don't drown myself in too much information and lose the joy for the game I currently have?
Is it just a case of getting all the plays in and expect a natural learning curve to occur or is there anyway I can sit down with a deck of expansions and work out where they all work?


You won't drown in too much information if you accept that you know very little but are open to learn. That way the information is less of a daunting ocean and more of a soothing hot-tub that you can just soak in for a while.

MrJuggles wrote:
There are some excellent podcasts out there like the Bad Publicity one where it seems like they have a great feel for the game. But the familiarity with every single card and it's relevance to where it plays well makes me feel like I am stood at a very tall mountain I'm going to struggle to conquer.


The mountain is not nearly as tall as you think and you should come at it with some patience and know that things will become clear one at a time. You'll make some mistakes while playing, you'll be confused during podcasts and not understand jargon. But, you'll pick things up one by one.

Here are a few newcomer tips for deckbuilding:

1. Understand the deckbuilding limitations - Influence costs, minimum Deck Size, and Agenda requirements (Corp only). This is the very first step.

2. Pick a theme and build around it - What do you want your deck to do? As a newcomer, it's best to pick one or two things and run with it. "I want my Kate deck to install cheap stuff and make lots of runs on R&D" or "I want my Corp deck to be able to safely score agendas behind a big WALL of ICE."

3. Find what cards will help you accomplish that theme - Let's go with the Runner scenario. Kate's ability gives her a 1 credit discount on the first Program/Hardware she installs each turn. There is also the Shaper card "Modded" which lets you install something for a 3 credit discount. Obviously, this card has great synergy with your theme. Then you want to be able to pressure R&D. R&D Interface helps with that as well as Indexing, Keyhole, and so on. With the Corp, you want to find a good range of ICE. Cheap stuff to keep the runner out early game and expensive stuff once you can afford it. Then, since you'll need to pay for some Big ICE, you'll want to build lots of economy OR ways around having to pay for ICE (Oversight AI, Priority Requisition). As you can see, it's much easier to look for cards that fit into your deck when it actually has a theme BEFORE you start building.

4. Ask yourself obvious questions - "Do I have enough ways as the runner to get past every type of ICE or around it?" "Will I be able to afford big ICE with my current economy?" "Does this card really fit with what I want my deck to do?" Aid yourself in weeding out unneccesary cards.

5. Ask yourself these questions while looking through new cards - "Would this help me obtain my goal? Or is it just a nice addition?" "This card seems very similar to this other card; which is the better choice for me?"

6. PLAY THE DECK - Decks have a way of seeming absolutely stunning as you build them...aaaand then not turning out so great when they're actually in practice. And that's okay! The biggest part of deckbuilding is tweaking and tweaking, playing and playing, refining and refining until things work optimally. You need to be patient with it. Instead of saying "This deck is horrible," after a loss, ask yourself, "Why didn't this deck work? What cards weren't as helpful as I thought they'd be? What should I look to change to fix that?"

Hope that helps! Practice makes perfect You'll get there.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mr Juggles
United Kingdom
Prestatyn
Denbighshire
flag msg tools
The sweat in my t-shirt and dust in my shoes, reminds me that paradise is only a point of view.
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
CommissarFeesh wrote:
You're in an excellent position right now where you and a friend have both got the Core set, and nothing else.


Weeell, like I said above I have more than the core set and I think this was my problem. I have pretty decent will power so I'm going to lock away the expansions and get comfortable with the core set only.

gumOnShoe wrote:
My opinion: Find the original championship games from Team Covenant and watch those. There's less jargon and it'll be in the context of a youtube video where you're watching whats happening. At that point in the game there was less to know. It was literally the card pool you have now: genesis cycle & core.


That is brilliant. I've watched a few of the newer ones and struggled, but after watching the a bit of these I find I am a lot more able to follow the action, thanks for pointing me that way.

BreadRising wrote:
Here are a few newcomer tips for deckbuilding:

1. Understand the deckbuilding limitations - Influence costs, minimum Deck Size, and Agenda requirements (Corp only). This is the very first step.

2. Pick a theme and build around it - What do you want your deck to do? As a newcomer, it's best to pick one or two things and run with it. "I want my Kate deck to install cheap stuff and make lots of runs on R&D" or "I want my Corp deck to be able to safely score agendas behind a big WALL of ICE."

3. Find what cards will help you accomplish that theme - Let's go with the Runner scenario. Kate's ability gives her a 1 credit discount on the first Program/Hardware she installs each turn. There is also the Shaper card "Modded" which lets you install something for a 3 credit discount. Obviously, this card has great synergy with your theme. Then you want to be able to pressure R&D. R&D Interface helps with that as well as Indexing, Keyhole, and so on. With the Corp, you want to find a good range of ICE. Cheap stuff to keep the runner out early game and expensive stuff once you can afford it. Then, since you'll need to pay for some Big ICE, you'll want to build lots of economy OR ways around having to pay for ICE (Oversight AI, Priority Requisition). As you can see, it's much easier to look for cards that fit into your deck when it actually has a theme BEFORE you start building.

4. Ask yourself obvious questions - "Do I have enough ways as the runner to get past every type of ICE or around it?" "Will I be able to afford big ICE with my current economy?" "Does this card really fit with what I want my deck to do?" Aid yourself in weeding out unneccesary cards.

5. Ask yourself these questions while looking through new cards - "Would this help me obtain my goal? Or is it just a nice addition?" "This card seems very similar to this other card; which is the better choice for me?"

6. PLAY THE DECK - Decks have a way of seeming absolutely stunning as you build them...aaaand then not turning out so great when they're actually in practice. And that's okay! The biggest part of deckbuilding is tweaking and tweaking, playing and playing, refining and refining until things work optimally. You need to be patient with it. Instead of saying "This deck is horrible," after a loss, ask yourself, "Why didn't this deck work? What cards weren't as helpful as I thought they'd be? What should I look to change to fix that?"

Hope that helps! Practice makes perfect You'll get there.


I guess I'm finally glad I got my first game after owning it for the few months I did and now I want to get into now, I need to be patient. I also like the idea of building a theme, I'm going to have to play a lot more to work out what I like the most. I do like a lot about NBN, but up to now always feel poor as a church mouse, I was loving it and cursing it in the same game.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.