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Marvel Dice Masters: Avengers vs. X-Men» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Basic give and take. rss

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Dave Maynor
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Ok, so just something I wanted to throw out there. I know the game is new, and people are trying to get their head around it still. But, if you have played other collectible games, or deck builders, etc... you realize these games are about 2 things. First is resources, and second is an engine.

Now there are going to be numerous strategy articles, and those really will speak to the engine. You have to have a strategy, and it must be a repeatable engine toward success. Various combinations of dice will have to work together to make that engine drive you toward your victory condition.

But you need resources to fuel any engine.

So what are our resources? Dice of course. And I like to think of this, just like any card game really, as potential or actual resources/energy. What is in your deck, in this case your dice bag, is only potential energy. But what is in your hand of card, or in your palm ready to roll, that is your real energy for any given turn. And having more is good. Having more than your opponent at any given moment is even better, and that often wins games.

So if we compare this to other formats, the dice back is the deck. The prep area becomes your hand. Now normally, this is empty, but you are drawing 4 per turn, where in other games you are normally drawing only 1, so this dynamic has changed a bit. It is more random. You draw more unknown resources, and have less on hand 'known' resources per turn, but are still dealing with a 4 'card' hand size really. Now in other games... MtG, L5R, Dominion, etc... card draw is great. Hand size is normally a non-issue, but fueling your hand is critical.

So, with the ebb and flow of this game, how can we accomplish this? Combat! KO'd characters become prep area dice. They become a larger hand size for the next turn. So each opposed combatant is potential 'card draw'. If you continually have more dice than your opponent, you have more options. Therefore, you should have a better chance to win.

Overall then, defending, even when you know you will lose a character, is better than taking it to the grill. Defending when you know you will die, and the attacker won't, is often STILL the better play resource wise. Now sure, your engine may change these parameters. You may need a character to stay in play for your engine to run well, and you may have some that only trigger during fielding, so you WANT them to die. These become interesting because your opponent have to decide to let them attack direct in order to clear them from your field, and it becomes choosing the lesser of 2 evils for them.

But in a pure resource view, opposed combat is almost always the way to increase resources and recruit larger dice. You might be giving them that opportunity also, but you just have to hope your path is more efficient than theirs.
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Bobb Beauchamp
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You've captured the mechanics of the game that present the most interest and challenge to me: When to attack, when to defend, and when to let something through unblocked. I don't know that I've ever played a game where getting your blockers KOed is seen as a good thing, even necessary. Sidekick dice can only ever produce one energy, but are necessary because of energy type to buying your heroes. And those 6 and 7 cost heroes, once you get them into your dice rotation, can win the game for you...but in order to even have a chance at getting them, you need at least 2 character/action dice...3 if it's a 7 cost. Unless you can get dice sent to your prep are so you're rolling more.

It's a really fascinating balance to me, since I've not really played any games like this, and MtG doesn't have this kind of winning for losing mechanic built into it.

 
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Mark Beazer
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I think in some ways the KO'd characters return to your prep area is brilliant.

In a lot of games, you'll have a (possibly quite long) build up period, then intense combat, followed by another build up period to gather your resources for another battle.

This mechanism provides something of a shortcut between the battles. If many of my dice are KO'd last round, I'll have more to roll THIS round. So, rather than the usual ebb and flow, in this game the fighting tends to build to a crescendo.

This is also something of a catchup mechanism. If you spank my defenders and do damage to my own person, you'll be losing dice to the "used" pile, but my heroes may well be back on the field next turn. In my early games I got bit by this a couple of times; "Look, he's wide open, I'm throwing everything at him" leads to "Oh crap, I've left myself no defense". If you throw everything you have at your opponent, you'd better knock him out.
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Dave M
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I completely agree. I think that the best comparison for this game is the deck building genre rather than CCGs.

Early on, the Silver Surfer global ability may also be a good play and well worth the two life.
 
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