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Subject: Emery Lore: How to keep tokens from being damaged by plastic stands rss

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Iain K
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That it was a dark and rainy night goes without saying. I'd only even met the dame at night, and with my office in Chinatown, well I wasn't gettin' much in the way of a tan.

“Redeemed” the others called her. I'd have hated to meet her before she'd gotten her head straight, if this was straight. Who'm I kiddin'? I'd probably have married the gal. But she knew about the old ones, and there were few of those who did that I'd rather have watchin' my back. At least ya' knew you couldn't trust her. It's the “academics” that worried me, but that's another story.

It was Chen that introduced us. Ahh Chen, now there's a dame who can kick. But again, I digress.

I was walking down Sacramento, minding my business as I always do when “The Redeemed” stepped out of an alley, as she always does. She wanted to talk. With her it was always the alley thing when she wants to talk. Chen'd always collar me a park. Not that I'd the time to walk in parks much ya' understand. But occasionally I'd be in one on a case, “workin' on my tan”, and BAMM there's Chen askin' if I want to go to Shanghai. Seriously, the dame's about as gorgeous as a gal can get, but does she honestly expect guys to answer “yes” to the Shanghai question? Maybe that's one of those "will checks" she's so great at.

So The Redeemed and I fall into a comfortable step as we always do. It's like that with some dames, they're shorter, but their legs are longer or some scientific thing. Hell, maybe it's just meant to be and suddenly you're walkin' in step through the rain like an old couple.

She's onto a new game, something “Eldritch is afoot”. Talkin' like one of those “Academics” now I notice. She's out of that asylum called Arkham and is lookin' for clues all over the world now. Going to Panama or some place. Naturally, I inquire why she's here in sunny SF. I mean I thought I'd gotten' out, gotten' away from all the madness. Lost myself in space if not exactly in time.

She wants to know if I can be persuaded to come along, says she doesn't care either way. Please. Wearin' the skirt I like, waitin' for me for who knows how long in an alley in Chinatown? In the rain?

She pulls some tokens from her bag, shows me who's on the team, and what they're up against. Now I'm no good with the names of these damn things ya' understand. They're ugly, unnatural as hell, so I shoot 'em, but I am observant. It's core to my value added service ya' understand. And being observant I can't help but notice the tokens she's showing me have creases, indentations in their lower faces.

“Ahh Sweetheart” I says. I call her “Sweetheart” when she's getting' a bit fuzzy. “Sweetheart, ya' been stickin' these in those plastic holders haven't ya'? Don't ya' remember what we learned in Arkham?”

“I have … a Condition” she confides, “I don't remember things from Arkham too good.”

Poor thing, she said it capitalized and everything. I look down at the wet pavement in front of us as we walk for a while in silence. Maybe I'm looking for the wheelbarrow full of Conditions that this dame's got.

“Ya' got an emery board Sweetheart?” I ask.





Test


If you fail, gain a Paranoia Condition and close this thread.

If you pass gain a Clue known to many players of Arkham Horror. There is a way to modify your stock plastic investigator stands so that they do not permanently deform the bottoms of your investigator tokens. You know, those grooves or other damage done to the token material as the stand compresses it? Damage that can result in permanent deformation that makes tokens fall out of the stand.

The typical investigator token is 2.3mm / 0.088" thick. Take an emery board, a disposable file usually used to shape one's fingernails, and run the board between the opposing ribs in the “jaws” of the investigator stand as shown in the image below. Experiment on one stand before you do them all! My board is 1.8mm / .074” thick. Running the board through the jaw of the stand just a few times opens the gap between the ribs so that the stand still holds tokens well, but leaves the tokens undamaged. With my board, I do not need to apply pressure to the ribs, I only need to “saw” the board gently down between the ribs until the board runs between the ribs with little effort. Do a couple passes on your test stand and then try a token.






Test


If you fail, lose 2 Sanity and close this thread.

If you pass gain a second Clue known to some players of Arkham Horror. Investigator stands can also be used to hold Monster and Gate tokens.




"So you won't be joining us?” and bless her heart, she honestly seemed disappointed.

“Sorry Sweetheart, maybe in a future expansion.” I told her while lookin' off into the rain. “There's always expansions.”


Close the Gate.
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We just leave them attached to the stands, but store them in a plastic craft box with the other components.
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Iain K
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As you like. But in my experience, in a short time the cardstock of the tokens, like all compliant materials, will relax under the press fit imposed by the more rigid stands and the tokens will fall out of the stands by themselves.

Besides, when players use stands to hold monsters, or investigators from expansions, the option to store the stock investigators in their stands goes away.
 
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Ian Cooper
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Speaking as a person who has been involved with paper conservation, these issues are complicated. There may be just as much damage done to the paper by abrading and roughening what was the smooth plastic edge of the ribs. Then there's the issue of temperature and humidity changes, which are going to make the cardboard expand and contract over time, which will both tighten and loosen those ribs, making the cardboard get those dents anyway, then making them drop out of the stands. Then there's the issue of the oils from your hands which will discolor and change the chemistry of the pieces. And let's not forget that these are cardboard pieces, probably made from non-archival pulp board, so these things are probably going to destroy themselves within a few years anyway: they will yellow, then they'll get more and more fragile as the cellulose deteriorates and releases acids that burn the paper.

At a certain point, when it comes to mass-produced paper products, the less you do, the better, and if conservation is the goal it's certainly better not to use the stands at all. Better still, don't play the game at all, leave it in its shrink-wrap and keep it in a cool dry dark place for the rest of your life, then leave it to your grandchildren who might be able to get $200 for it. But even then, there's the issue of the game box itself, which is made from the cheapest pulp chipboard - it will burn everything it has close contact with. The only way to stop this is to encase everything in the box in archival rag or mylar - and to do that, you have to open the box, which makes it lose value in some collectors' eyes. So it really is a catch-22 situation. As for a game that has been played, the resale value will be something like $10-20. Mass produced games just don't increase in value as much as people seem to think, and if you play with them at all, they lose value and never regain it.

So my advice is this: if you're gonna play the game, just play the game. If you're a collector, don't even open the shrinkwrap: put the game in a humidity-and-temperature-controlled room for a few decades and hope the cardboard doesn't deteriorate too much. But even then, it's never going to fetch the sort of prices that the first Monopoly games get, because this game was produced in the tens of thousands, not as a one-off or a limited edition of 100, like some games from the 1800s and 1900s that became famous.
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Ancestral Hamster
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Liked the story!
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Kain
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Beery wrote:

So my advice is this: if you're gonna play the game, just play the game. If you're a collector, don't even open the shrinkwrap: put the game in a humidity-and-temperature-controlled room for a few decades and hope the cardboard doesn't deteriorate too much. But even then, it's never going to fetch the sort of prices that the first Monopoly games get, because this game was produced in the tens of thousands, not as a one-off or a limited edition of 100, like some games from the 1800s and 1900s that became famous.

This is the way I started to feel about all my board games lately
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