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CapCom Street Fighter Deck-Building Game» Forums » Variants

Subject: Street Fighter Synergy and Six-Card Hands rss

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Alphonso McCutchen
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Street Fighter Synergy
One of the reasons I enjoyed Heroes Unite over the original DC Deckbuilding game were the interesting variants listed in the rulebook: Super Hero Synergy, Super-Villain Hunt, and Super-Hidden Super-Villains. Therefore, I was quite surprised to open the Street Fighter Deckbuilding game rulebook and find variants that seem to be fairly nonsensical and uninteresting. I'm wondering if there is a reason the Super Hero Synergy variant was not included in the Street Fighter Deckbuilding game, such as some kind of balance issue.

Six-Card Hands
I find that the Street Fighter Deckbuilding game moves much more slowly than the DC Deckbuilding games. I think this might be because the Street Fighters don't have abilities that generate power for playing cards of a certain type, such as Batman's bonus from playing Equipment cards. Last night I tried playing a game with six-card hands, but it didn't seem to make the game any shorter. Any suggestions?
 
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Peter Cooper
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I was surprised at how much longer the game took to play, too, but I put it down to unfamiliarity. Thinking about it, though, there are fewer mega-powered combos (our highest power in one turn of HU was 97, where our highest in SF was less than 20). This means that the power to tackle the end-stages doesn't come up as often.

Also, the attack rate is higher, and because you choose your target for attacks lots of the time, you have to follow what your opponents are doing a bit more closely. However, I like the differences in the games.
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Steven Herandez
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I prefer 5 card hands. Reasons why,

Theme wise, "street fighter" is just a bunch of jacked up strong smart fighters.

DC are very strong super heroes who have powers and gadgets and also stand together.

Comparing DC DBG to SF DBG

You can't compare the damage output between them because of the themes.
Not many street fighters stick together and team up compared to DC, which leads to the phrase "Power by the numbers"

In DC a week hand late game is about 9 and lower.

In SF late game, a week hand is about 5and lower.

DC late game strong hand is about 25+(and you can even get really higher than that)

SF late game strong hand is about 15+.

I didn't say anything about even hands.

But if you think like this, then you'll understand SF DBG more.
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Alphonso McCutchen
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Stephanie Baynes wrote:
I was surprised at how much longer the game took to play, too, but I put it down to unfamiliarity. Thinking about it, though, there are fewer mega-powered combos (our highest power in one turn of HU was 97, where our highest in SF was less than 20). This means that the power to tackle the end-stages doesn't come up as often.

I find that Street Fighter has more modular combos--that is, a wider variety of cards that can possibly combo with each other--but that they aren't as powerful. Sometimes I'll play what feels like a cool sequence only to find that it generates like 8 Power.

Stephanie Baynes wrote:
Also, the attack rate is higher, and because you choose your target for attacks lots of the time, you have to follow what your opponents are doing a bit more closely. However, I like the differences in the games.

The higher frequency of Attacks may also have to do with it; one reason players can't defeat the end-stages is that they keep getting handed Weaknesses or discards. One time I had a game of DC Deckbuilding go really long because I grabbed Scarecrow really early and he junked up everyone's decks at the start.

I do enjoy the different styles of the games, but I would appreciate if they had similar play lengths. My usual gaming group is used to DC Deckbuilding taking a certain amount of time, and it's jarring when we can't finish Street Fighter Deckbuilding in that same amount of time. I've also had several new players ask, "When does this game end?"

mrlebarican wrote:
I prefer 5 card hands. Reasons why,

Theme wise, "street fighter" is just a bunch of jacked up strong smart fighters.

DC are very strong super heroes who have powers and gadgets and also stand together.

You can't compare the damage output between them because of the themes.
Not many street fighters stick together and team up compared to DC, which leads to the phrase "Power by the numbers"

I don't see how this is relevant. The Street Fighters are just as strong as the Marvel characters in the Marvel vs Capcom games. It really just depends on what game it is and who's doing the writing.

The fact that the DC characters work as a team to increase their power is reflected in that the DC Deckbuilding games have fewer Attack cards, even though the DC game isn't a co-operative game. As noted above, the frequent, targeted Attacks of Street Fighter do lengthen the game. However, I don't think it's a great explanation for the DC characters' higher power because from a narrative standpoint, it's the villains who are deciding how the Attacks work, not the heroes. In other words, Scarecrow views the whole Justice League as a threat, so he attacks all of them--regardless of the fact that their players aren't actually working together!

mrlebarican wrote:
In DC a week hand late game is about 9 and lower.

In SF late game, a week hand is about 5and lower.

DC late game strong hand is about 25+(and you can even get really higher than that)

SF late game strong hand is about 15+.

I didn't say anything about even hands.

But if you think like this, then you'll understand SF DBG more.

In my plays, I don't typically see hands with 15+ Power. We're often struggling to reach 12, and sometimes have been unable to defeat Thailand before exhausting the deck.

I'm thinking that maybe I'll try putting Kicks in the starting deck rather than using six-card hands.
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Steven Herandez
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Now i play both games pretty good 1v1 and I hit 15 late game a couple of times. I was really happy to because it's hard to stock up on power.

I wasn't talking about 15 power hands frequently being played. I'm just saying that's a strong hand.

I still stand by what I said about the theme. Also I have a crazy imagination which allows me to see dc dbg as a team game, just think the actual super heroes are fighting together capturing the villains, some times they get out and hurt almost everyone. At the end, every super hero wins, just one gets recognized as the one who did the most work.
That's the short version.

Now the original street fighter everyone fights each other, you don't really have a team, just solo.

Oh and my 1v1s are dc paste for SF, I played about seven games already and I understand it. I say DC takes longer because of the combo potential!
Street fighter doesn't have as many combos but it interacts whole lot more!

I wish we were able to playa game together, I would like to see how everyone plays.


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Alphonso McCutchen
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mrlebarican wrote:
Now i play both games pretty good 1v1 and I hit 15 late game a couple of times.

This is probably the reason for the difference in our experience. I haven't played any of the Cryptozoic deckbuilders with fewer than three players.
 
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Steven Herandez
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notthephonz wrote:
mrlebarican wrote:
Now i play both games pretty good 1v1 and I hit 15 late game a couple of times.

This is probably the reason for the difference in our experience. I haven't played any of the Cryptozoic deckbuilders with fewer than three players.


Just played two games, with 3 people, first one was almost an hour and a half long, second one was a little over 40 minutes long.

What's the play length in yours?
 
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Alphonso McCutchen
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It's about an hour and a half for my group as well, but we're used to the length being closer to an hour for DC Deckbuilding. Street Fighter does feel like it drags out for a while at a certain point, and for us a 15 Power hand would be a fluke rather than a "strong hand."
 
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Carquinyoli

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6 SF games here (3 1x1, 2 with 3 players, 1 with 5 players), after having played quite a lot with DC DBG.

2 player games tend to finish with a very close result in the range of 7X-8X points each player.
With 2 player games we manage to better build our deck, and we've been been able to pull up to 18-19 Power combos (still have not reached 20). Normal hands of 5-8 Power after the first few rounds, and occasional 9-13 Power hands).
Lots of "I attack""you counter""I defend".
Many times attacks are not played fearing a counter-attack.

I do believe there is synergy, and I don't think 6 hand cards are necessary. I believe many of us are comparing SF with DC Comics DBG. On DC we play super-heroes with huge and awesome super-powers. On SF we play just good fighters (humans in good shape without superpowers) so we cannot collect so much power. Superman can destroy a building with the blink of an eye. Ryu needs 2 minutes, and lots of kicks and punchs to destroy a car..... and this is reflected on the game.
On SF there is a lot more interaction, more attacks-counters-blocking-and-defenses, like on the videogame.

In my opinion, SF is tough. You need to better think what to do and what to buy. On DC you usually buy the most expensive card on line-up (or Super-villain). On SF you need to buy what you need to oil your machine, not what is more expensive. It takes more effort to build a good deck.
 
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