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Subject: Card Stock rss

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Jared Misner
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I've been reviewing quotes with board game manufacturers, and card stock questions come up frequently. They are sending me cards in the mail for comparison, but I wanted to reach out to others who may have more experience with them.

If a game is using shuffling pretty frequently such as a TCG or a Deck Building game, what is the lowest quality card stock you would feel comfortable using.

As it's a Kickstarter project, we will make stretch goals to upgrade the components, but I was looking for feedback from users with experience on the subject to chime in on what the bare minimum stock to be used should be if the project barely funds.
 
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Sturv Tafvherd
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scroll down to the bottom:
http://www.makeplayingcards.com/promotional/custom-game-card...

Quote:
We have four types of cardstock.

Our most basic cardstock is the promotional 270gsm blue core which is perfect for promotional giveaways but still with excellent qaulity.

Smooth finish on 300 gsm cardstock with blue core are popular for normal printing and card playing use.

Linen finish on 310 gsm French cardstock with black core are the best option for paper material. Casinos around the world prefer the linen version as this type offers enhanced durability and tend to be scratch proof.

The latest addition to our range is the 100% 13pt plastic premium cards which are completely water proof and premium quality. A top choice for people who are looking for great handling and top print quality to last a long time.




edit ...

Print And Play Productions offer 270 gsm cards. I've seen these, they are very do-able as a minimum.

Artscow and PrinterStudio use 300 gsm, I think. They are noticeably better when shuffled.

I've never tried a linen finish, but I believe if you bought Bee or Bicycle or Ace, they'd have a linen finish. It supposedly makes for more "slippery" cards.
 
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Jared Misner
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Thanks!
 
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Nick Hayes
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300 gsm is a good place to start. If you need to reduce your costs you can go for thinner stock, like 250 gsm, but the cards will be noticeably thinner. If you want something premium, go with 300-350gsm plastic coated cards.
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John A. White
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The real question is when is 310 GSM 8.5 x 11 going to be made for our home printers?

EDIT: $88... not happening https://www.google.com/shopping/product/2339347491529545939?...

Hmm
http://www.adorama.com/ILYFA81110.html
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Nicholas Ferezin
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270gsm are OK, don't let people tell you they aren't. However they are by definition thinner, and if they will be the core components for a game that involves a lot of shuffling it would make sense to try and get 300gsm cards. The good thing about kickstarter is that if you don't think 300gsm is viable as an initial goal you can always have it as a stretch goal.
 
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