Jayson Myers
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Please check out my other reviews at:

http://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/145695/the-purge-reviews-a...



Conclusion:

I have yet to read the books, but I do watch the TV show. I have to say I am a fan of the universe (at least inside the television program). I also really like Memoir 44 and Battlelore (I've yet to play Command and Colors as of this writing). Sure, they are simple games but that is what I like about them. I lean more towards Memoir 44, but the theme of Game of Thrones pulled me into this game.

The theme is there. The game tries hard to drip the theme and it does a good job. Yet, I don't feel I am into the story of the show all that much. Sure, the cards say different character's names, but this game is not about the backstabbing and politics. This game is all about the battles on the battlefields.

In the base game, you get Starks vs. Lannisters. This is perhaps the two most famous families in the game and they are going to maneuver, fight, and battle for the victory.

The game is like Battlelore in the minis and the hexagonal maps and tiles. Everything sort of "looks" the same, yet the game is very different. The days of the Left/Center/Right battlefield and card usage is gone. In this game, you can move people based on the roll of the dice (details later). This is a major change. I will explain how this works under "Flow of the Game". The games are in the same universe, but are not on the same planet.

As I become more and more of a "gamer", this style of game is becoming lighter and lighter to me. When I play, I don't feel like I have a lot of control. When someone attacks me, I cannot defend (I just get hit). This creates a situation where I have to be next to you to hit you, but I cannot run after I attack so I am stuck hoping I get the right dice results as you will be hitting me next round. I also don't like that even when your team gets lose part of the group, you can still hit me with the full force. I am sure this is a balancing issue, but it stinks when you are crushing someone but they have one guy left and he is hitting you like he is at full force.

Overall, this game is a little heavier than the other games in the "series". There are some really interesting decisions left for you to make, but when it comes down to it: you move and attack. In order to win, you need some luck on your side. This is a light enough game to play with non-war gamers and even non-gamers. It is a fun game and most fans of the series will enjoy it.

Keeper.



Components:

The components are top notch. The minis have to be put together and likely glued. They do look good and can be "easily" painted. The cards, chits, and board are all top notch. This is a Fantasy Flight game so everything is top notch. The minis are smaller, so the minis of the characters from the series won't look exactly like the people. Yet, for this scale of game they look great. If you have played any of the other games in the series, then you know what to expect.

I hate game where you have to put it together. I hate putting the minis together and putting stickers on the banners. I bought a set that was painted and put together so I didn't have to sit through that torture.

The cards are fantastic and I enjoyed the art on them. They will last a long time. The dice are great and are 8 sided.



Rule Book:

You get two books.

1. Battle Plans - This is a scenario book. It is full color and has great examples. Each scenario has a back story and it really brings the battle alive. The set up time is heavy, but the book is great about bringing the story alive. There are 10 scenarios in the book. The last page is a quick reference for the terrain types.

2. Rule Book - This is classic Fantasy Flight fare. We get a 32 page rule book that is full color and full of examples. The game has a much needed (and appreciated!) component overview. Why don't more games have this?

The rules are laid out in turn order. Then more details are provided. There are a detailed instructions for combat and additional rules (terrain!).

The book is a tad long winded. I don't believe the game is a 32 page game. The book explains everything in extreme detail. I feel it should have been a shorter explanation with additional rules later. The pictures and examples make it longer, which is appreciated.

I think both books do a good job. Just don't expect the rules from the rest of the games in the series. This one is different.



Flow of the Game:

This is really different from the other games in the series. Gone is the Left/Right/Center and in is rolling of dice for the ability to move troops.

I am going to describe the flow of the game and not the rules.

Here are the stages:

1. Rally - Everything resets. Anyone who has moved, can move again.

2. Marshaling - Roll your dice to see who you can move (i.e. if you roll a blue, you get a blue chit and thus can move a "blue" team this turn). You also get to draw more leadership cards.

3. Command (main part of the game) - The players will take turns -

You have three options in this phase:

A. use order tokens - these are the tokens granted from rolling the dice. This is how you can move people on the board. If you have blue tokens, you can move a blue team, etc.

B. Play Leadership cards - You get 3 command tokens per turn you play. Each leader can play a number of command tokens (listed on their card) and thus command people two hexes away via the use of cards. You want to protect your leaders as this can be very powerful.

C. Pass - When both people pass, the round is over.

4. Regroup - This is the cleanup phase. You score VP, advance round marker, etc.

To sum up the game, you move and attack. How you move an attack is the guts of the game.

I will explain the combat a little. A person being attack cannot defend. When you attack, you check Line of Sight (center of tile to center of tile) and range. Each different color gets a number of attack dice and these are rolled to see how many hits you get. Each hit takes one mini from the group, when all the minis are gone the group is eliminated.


The game is intended to be a easy to play war game based on an established license and it succeeds.



Should I buy this Game?:

Yes. If you do not mind a light war game, then this might be one of your favorites. While it is dripping in theme, I didn't really feel it was a Game of Thrones setting.

If you are a fan of the show, you will enjoy seeing the characters and fighting the battles from the books.

I have to recommend this game and will be keeping it.
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Ted Magdzinski
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There's several rules that came out after the game was published that fix some of those weird things in these games. It's been awhile since I've played, but if I recall correctly, if a unit has lost half of it's troops, then it does in fact roll one less die to attack, so a one-soldier unit does not hit you at full strength. That would help one of your issues with the combat.

Also, it is based more on the books, so it makes more sense that the theme is much more in line with the broader world of ASoIAF. In that sense it is pretty rich, since many of the commanders are only in the books and not mentioned in the show at all.
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Scott Randolph
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I am really surprised you focused on the order tokens over the Leadership Cards, the ZoC (Commander's "Zone of Control") concept and the importance of formations.

The order tokens are the secondary means of activating units, for units outside of a Commander's ZoC. It is the Leadership cards that are the primary and most effective means for activating units.

The "Rally" mechanic is also quite important, unlike Mem44, C&C:A/C&C:N, and their ilk, one cannot just reuse the same units over and over, turn after turn. Units, generally speaking move/attack once per round, unless "Rallied" - which takes some planning and tactical consideration.

...BUT...I am glad you like the game, it's an outstanding tactical-level, quasi-medieval era wargame.
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Jayson Myers
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I need to check out these new rules. I was playing per the rules in the book.


ScubaSteveKzoo wrote:
There's several rules that came out after the game was published that fix some of those weird things in these games. It's been awhile since I've played, but if I recall correctly, if a unit has lost half of it's troops, then it does in fact roll one less die to attack, so a one-soldier unit does not hit you at full strength. That would help one of your issues with the combat.

Also, it is based more on the books, so it makes more sense that the theme is much more in line with the broader world of ASoIAF. In that sense it is pretty rich, since many of the commanders are only in the books and not mentioned in the show at all.
 
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Jayson Myers
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I found it to be a big part of the game, but I thought I had brought it up. If my Leader only allowed 2 tokens played, it was hard to give them an order, then rally, and give another order without using the tokens.

If I didn't give enough weight to it, then it was an accident. Yet, the big move from cards to dice was a game changer to me.



SFRR wrote:
I am really surprised you focused on the order tokens over the Leadership Cards, the ZoC (Commander's "Zone of Control") concept and the importance of formations.

The order tokens are the secondary means of activating units, for units outside of a Commander's ZoC. It is the Leadership cards that are the primary and most effective means for activating units.

The "Rally" mechanic is also quite important, unlike Mem44, C&C:A/C&C:N, and their ilk, one cannot just reuse the same units over and over, turn after turn. Units, generally speaking move/attack once per round, unless "Rallied" - which takes some planning and tactical consideration.

...BUT...I am glad you like the game, it's an outstanding tactical-level, quasi-medieval era wargame.
 
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Scott Randolph
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william4192 wrote:
Yet, the big move from cards to dice was a game changer to me.



I am still confused by this comment, BoW uses Leadership Cards and order tokens, Leadership Cards allow a player to activate 2 units most of the time in the same turn, and sometimes 3 (depending on the Leadership Card) - maybe I just do not understand your explanation of the game mechanics...it sounds almost as though you believe that if you have 2 blue rank units within a Commander's ZoC, but if you do not have 2 blue order tokens, then you cannot move the 2 blue rank units (which is not true of course)...maybe I just don't understand the way you are expressing it.
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SFRR wrote:
william4192 wrote:
Yet, the big move from cards to dice was a game changer to me.



I am still confused by this comment, BoW uses Leadership Cards and order tokens, Leadership Cards allow a player to activate 2 units most of the time in the same turn, and sometimes 3 (depending on the Leadership Card) - maybe I just do not understand your explanation of the game mechanics...it sounds almost as though you believe that if you have 2 blue rank units within a Commander's ZoC, but if you do not have 2 blue order tokens, then you cannot move the 2 blue rank units (which is not true of course)...maybe I just don't understand the way you are expressing it.



In the original format, you had to have a card that allowed you to move the "left flank".

In this game, I roll the dice and I get X orders. Let's say the dice let me order 2 blue, 1 green, and 1 Red. I can move the blue on the left flank or the the blue on the right flank (or in this case both).

In the original series, it was frustrating at times to want to move someone on the left side of the board but were unable. I guess it could be equally frustrating this go around if I don't get the the dice rolls I need.

Except there is a new wrinkle in this version. I can also play cards to order troops around the board. Leaders (as long as they are on the board) can order troops that are within 2 hexes of them via the leadership card.

This opens up fewer situations where you can't do what you want. It is also much more flexible.

This is my understanding. Please let me know if I have a misunderstanding of the rules.
 
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Xavier A. Perez
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william4192 wrote:
SFRR wrote:
william4192 wrote:
Yet, the big move from cards to dice was a game changer to me.



I am still confused by this comment, BoW uses Leadership Cards and order tokens, Leadership Cards allow a player to activate 2 units most of the time in the same turn, and sometimes 3 (depending on the Leadership Card) - maybe I just do not understand your explanation of the game mechanics...it sounds almost as though you believe that if you have 2 blue rank units within a Commander's ZoC, but if you do not have 2 blue order tokens, then you cannot move the 2 blue rank units (which is not true of course)...maybe I just don't understand the way you are expressing it.



In the original format, you had to have a card that allowed you to move the "left flank".

In this game, I roll the dice and I get X orders. Let's say the dice let me order 2 blue, 1 green, and 1 Red. I can move the blue on the left flank or the the blue on the right flank (or in this case both).

In the original series, it was frustrating at times to want to move someone on the left side of the board but were unable. I guess it could be equally frustrating this go around if I don't get the the dice rolls I need.

Except there is a new wrinkle in this version. I can also play cards to order troops around the board. Leaders (as long as they are on the board) can order troops that are within 2 hexes of them via the leadership card.

This opens up fewer situations where you can't do what you want. It is also much more flexible.

This is my understanding. Please let me know if I have a misunderstanding of the rules.


The rules are right, I think the concept where you and Scott disagree (I agree with Scott) is that the way you phrase it, it seems that tokens are the main way to order units, with cards and leaders as a secondary, where it is actually the other way around:

You main way to order units is via cards using your commanders and their ZoC, so positioning units so that they're into a commander's ZoC is most important. Tokens are a secondary way to move the "straggler" units that were left out of the commander's ZoC.
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It's so interesting and I may be in the minority but I see it as the opposite.


Fair enough though. Either way, there is two ways to move the warriors. whistle


Xapi wrote:
william4192 wrote:
SFRR wrote:
william4192 wrote:
Yet, the big move from cards to dice was a game changer to me.



I am still confused by this comment, BoW uses Leadership Cards and order tokens, Leadership Cards allow a player to activate 2 units most of the time in the same turn, and sometimes 3 (depending on the Leadership Card) - maybe I just do not understand your explanation of the game mechanics...it sounds almost as though you believe that if you have 2 blue rank units within a Commander's ZoC, but if you do not have 2 blue order tokens, then you cannot move the 2 blue rank units (which is not true of course)...maybe I just don't understand the way you are expressing it.



In the original format, you had to have a card that allowed you to move the "left flank".

In this game, I roll the dice and I get X orders. Let's say the dice let me order 2 blue, 1 green, and 1 Red. I can move the blue on the left flank or the the blue on the right flank (or in this case both).

In the original series, it was frustrating at times to want to move someone on the left side of the board but were unable. I guess it could be equally frustrating this go around if I don't get the the dice rolls I need.

Except there is a new wrinkle in this version. I can also play cards to order troops around the board. Leaders (as long as they are on the board) can order troops that are within 2 hexes of them via the leadership card.

This opens up fewer situations where you can't do what you want. It is also much more flexible.

This is my understanding. Please let me know if I have a misunderstanding of the rules.


The rules are right, I think the concept where you and Scott disagree (I agree with Scott) is that the way you phrase it, it seems that tokens are the main way to order units, with cards and leaders as a secondary, where it is actually the other way around:

You main way to order units is via cards using your commanders and their ZoC, so positioning units so that they're into a commander's ZoC is most important. Tokens are a secondary way to move the "straggler" units that were left out of the commander's ZoC.
 
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Geoff Denight
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Having played the game once without understanding the difference between the Order token Leadership Cards work I can unequivocally say the cards are primary... moving any 2-3 units versus 1 at time (if you have the right token) Is clearly superior.
That is the other point.. you get between 4 and 5 tokens a turn. Very limiting even if you get the right tokens. The right set of cards will move 8 to 12 units.
With all this said, as my opponents have learned it is critical to move your units in formation so the are within the ZoC of a leader. Stragglers can be a pain to move and keep in the fight.
Of course ultimate is move (token or cards), rally and move again. So while I believe the ZoC and Leadership Cards are more important then tokens, obviously the ability to strategicly employ both wins games.
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