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Subject: japanese stationery - part II - word cards rss

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SAKURA in KYOTO 2018 Back to Kansai
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So several years ago I got slightly into Getting Things Done (GTD) and one of the things I really took to heart was to right write tasks down as soon as you think of it. GTD helped me break tasks down into smaller steps and especially to realise the Next Action, that is, what thing, however small, has to happen next to progress. Next Action has helped me with procrastination, as it makes it easier to make even a small step on some task, rather than keep putting off the whole.

But writing things down lead me to experiment with notepads and notebooks and the like. And then I tried the Hipster PDA, but I didn't like the big clip, which lead me to discovering binder rings. We don't have binder rings in the UK (well we didn't then and I doubt we have them yet). But eventually I got to this:



This is my version of a Hipster PDA. It's a set of small index cards inside a couple of cover cards, with one hole punched top centre and a binder ring (here I'm trying 2 for reasons) and a pen on the ring and a band which is annoying. The pen is so I always have a pen. On the covers, I've marked CMs, because I'm always scrabbling for a rule to find the size of things, or estimate the size from measurements I've read.



This is what it looks like inside. For those saying, it's just a notepad, it is not. Firstly, the binder ring allows me to open it up, and re-arrange and sort the cards. Processing your captured thoughts is part of GTD. It allows me a lot of flexibility in using the device, and I can easily re-cycle the cards as I go. (Also, they're not just flash cards).

Secondly, it's a lot easier to use than a spiral bound notepad, or a notebook. Because I can flip through, and rotate the pages, I can compare, transfer and process my thoughts better. There's less copying of tasks and more ability to add to terse notation.

And it's easier to remove a card and store it permanently, in an index box or on another ring. This way, I have rings for some contacts, for some projects, for certain tasks. I've one for going abroad for example, which includes what I need to pack, to arrange, to book, to buy and so on. I don't need to refer to it often, and it's easy to keep with my passport.

I use the same method with larger sized cards when I'm gathering my thoughts on a project. I still write out To Do lists, often by processing the cards. But having the cards with me is a good reminder, especially when I go into town.


http://product.rakuten.co.jp/product/%E3%83%99%E3%83%AD%E3%8...

These are the Japanese binder rings I got sent from Japan (yes, it does say Card Ling). I got another set LC26, but I prefer these. I also had a set of American binder rings (Office Depot), but I much prefer the Japanese ones. The steel is thinner, the hinge is smoother, the tooth lock is much tighter. I found the US ones to be harder to use and easier to fall open (spilling the cards).


http://www.correct.co.jp/02prof/index.html

These are the Japanese index cards I got sent from Japan. Grid printed on both sides right over the edge, very nice card, no bleeding. Again, I had some quad cards sent from America, not as good. Only printed on one side, thicker, darker lines, blank on the reverse, and the card is thicker too.

I prefer grid printing because I can write in either direction, but I tend to be sloppy in any case.

So what's the point of all this?



It turns out, they've had this device in Japan for years. They call them Word Cards, and they tend to be used by students to study a language. I got this nice Maruman set through a UK supplier, 100 blank cards in a good art paper. But as you can see from the pack below, a size smaller than my index cards. The index ring is much larger though, which interests me.

http://yamadastationery.jp/%E5%8D%98%E8%AA%9E%E3%82%AB%E3%83...

http://www.kyokuto-note.co.jp/products/search/?Category.id=8

http://www.raymay.co.jp/school/contents/stationery/card01/li...

http://store.ito-ya.co.jp/item/49014801630621.html

And a woman in the US has made her own version:
http://www.myndology.com/shop/ring-bound
and you can get them in Target: http://myndology.com/shop/ring-bound/fuse-2013

Anyway, I invented them and I'm suing Japan for totally stealing my idea.

The only problem I had was that occasionally, the ring would open and spill the cards. This was when I was using it a lot and chucking it in and out of bags. At the moment, not so much use, but I'm experimenting with two rings, but that then slows down the utility of opening the ring to swap cards around.
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Josh Jennings
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EYE of NiGHT wrote:
(yes, it does say Card Ling)


The Japanese language has oh-so-much trouble with R's and L's.
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Mike Norris
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...and J-Pop too!!!!
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And Vs, Qs, and Xs...just to name a few more. lol

J and F are pretty limited too.
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jumbit
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I've also seen the ring-bound cards sold as "taxi cards" for illiterate foreigners to find their way in Chinese cities. Each card has a popular destination that foreigners are likely to want to visit. When traveling about the city the foreigner need only point to the card he wants, which contains the location's address in English and Chinese.
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