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Subject: Village - A Detailed Review rss

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This review continues my series of detailed reviews that attempt to be part review, part resource for anyone not totally familiar with the game. For this reason I expect readers to skip to the sections that are of most interest.

If you liked the review please thumb the top of the article so others have a better chance of seeing it and I know you stopped by. Thanks for reading.

Summary

Game Type - Euro Game
Play Time: 75-100 minutes
Number of Players: 2-4
Mechanics - Set Collection, Worker Placement, Meeple Management
Difficulty - Moderate (Takes a few plays to get a good grip on the moving parts)
Components - Excellent
Release - 2011

Designer(s) - Inka Brand and Markus Brand (A Castle for All Seasons, Guatemala Cafe, La Boca, Saint Malo)

Overview and Theme

Welcome to generic-ville. It could be a village anywhere in the middle ages, Medieval times or the times of Robin Hood. It has a church, council chambers, farmland, a marketplace and a whole raft of skilled craftsman. It’s a place where dudes wear feathers in their hats, writing is done with ink and quill and getting from here to there is done with horse and cart. The ladies wear dresses covering them from neck to toe and life passes from one season to the next.

This is Village, a worker placement Euro with a twist that has helped it stand out from the pack and had many a Euro-phile excited over the past few years.

Adding to the buzz, Village picked up the Deutscher Spiele Preis - Best Family/Adult Game in 2012 as well as the Spiel des Jahres - Kennerspiel des Jahres (Special mention) in the same year. This award would suggest that Village was considered just a little too heavy for the SdJ. Games Magazine then honoured it with their Best New Advanced Strategy Game award in 2013.

So get your ‘townsfolk’ on and take a walk down the quaint cobbled road with me as we take a look at what all the fuss is about.

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The Components

Village isn't trying to beat around the bush...it's a Euro and it wants you to know it. The good news here is that the game offers up top notch production values and the artwork helps the theme to shine through the mechanics.

d10-1 Board – Village offers up a nice square board that depicts, not surprisingly, a village. It is made up of various buildings and notable features. In the distance a series of towns and cities can be seen to entice the intrepid traveller. Like any good Euro there are icons plastered all over the place but they are not overwhelming at all.

Surrounding the board is a score track, which tracks each player's VPs, which the game refers to as Prestige. Rather than using just simple numbers the track uses the image of a scroll page, which is a nice thematic addition.

Overall the artwork is really well done without quite being up to the standard of a Michael Menzel. But hats off to Dennis Lohausen all the same. I suspect we will be seeing more of his work in the future.


Image Courtesy of marshduck


d10-2 Farm/Player Boards – Each player is given a mid-sized Farmyard Board to depict the family holdings. Each is a different colour and a farm complete with a barn and a house is featured. Around the border a time-track is present, which makes use of the iconic hourglass motif.

The boards offer a lovely thickness that screams 'I'm a quality production!' meeple


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-3 Villager Meeple - No worker placement game is complete without meeple and Village offers each player no less than 11. Before any game can be played each set of meeple must be stickered on the front and back so that each one features a number.

Each player will have four meeple with a 1, three with a 2, two with a 3 and two with a 4. These numbers represent the generation that each meeple comes from within a given family, which I will elaborate on later.

The game also comes with 4 black meeple, which represent Monks. These are owned by no player but they also require a sticker, although there sticker features no number. The reason for which will become apparent as I outline the game.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-4 Player Markers - The other wooden component in the game comes in the form of wooden discs. These are used to keep track of a player's score, their time track and also to record where they travel to in the course of the game.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-5 Goods Tiles – In the game the players can create 5 different types of goods. These take the form of smaller oblong shaped tiles. The quality here is good and it is clear as to what each one represents.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-6 Grain and Coin - Both grain and coin are important commodities in Village and they both get their own cardboard token bits. The quality is in line with all other parts of the production, top draw, but I am happy to report that a coin token can survive being dropped into a glass of Coke and still look damn good after being dried off. Let's just say my jaw hit the floor when it happened. Damn you Club Dave!!!! laugh


Images Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-7 Customer Tiles – Customers will come to Market Day during the game and many of them want different things. Small square cardboard tokens represent the needs of each customer and how many VP (Prestige) they are worth.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-8 Influence Cubes - Village earns that 'classic Euro' badge by offering up all manner of coloured cubes. These cubes represent traits that can be displayed by your family members. These cubes will need to be spent at various locations to get things done. It's a nice way to add a bit of theme to the classic 'get cube, spend cube' routine.


Image Courtesy of Siromist


d10-9 Set-up Tiles - Euros always need to be balanced if they are to scale well between the number of players. Village helps manage the changes required by offering 3 Set-Up Tiles that outline how many of each cube are added to the Green Cloth Bag each round.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-1d10-0 Mass Tiles - In a similar vein, a Summary Tile is provided to reinforce the four key steps that must be carried out in the Mass Phase at the end of each turn. Both these and the previous tile could easily have been printed on the back of the rulebook, but the addition of tiles is a quality touch.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


d10-1d10-1 Rules - As you will see from this review, there is a fair bit going on in Village and writing a rulebook to make things clear is no easy task. I am happy to say that I found the rulebook to be very well laid out and the flow of the game was very clear.

Like always I had one or two hiccups but this says more about me than the rulebook.


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


Village is what every gamer wants their Euro to be - a high quality production that not only plays well, but looks and feels great doing it too. It also includes two cloth bags and a little cardboard ring!

Last night I opened the box to look at the components again before writing this section and the game even smelled like Euro-y goodness with all those wooden and cardboard components.


Image Courtesy of Juliusan


Set-up


Image Courtesy of EndersGame
Village, like many a Euro, maintains its balance by altering elements based on the number of players. So the first thing that is needed is to take the Set-up Tile that matches the number of players in the game as this outlines how many Influence Cubes should be added to the Green Cloth Bag at the start of each round.

This is placed within plain view for reference and the Mass Summary Tile is likewise set aside.

Each player takes a Farmyard Tile, their 11 Family Members and the various player tokens of the matching colour. The four 1st Generation Meeple are placed on each player's farm and the rest are set aside to be acquired throughout the game. Each player takes 1 Gold Coin from the supply and the Ring Token is placed on the first level of the Council Chambers.

The 6 Plague Cubes are added to the Green Cloth Bag and the 4 Monks (black meeple) are added to the Black Cloth Bag.

A number of Customer Tiles are placed in the blue bordered Market boxes and the waiting cue boxes. The rest are placed in face down piles for drawing later in the game.

A start player must be chosen and they are given the Start Player Token.

All of the other components are placed in supply piles, ready to be taken as the game unfolds.

The players put one marker on the time icon to the right of the bridge illustration on their Farmyard Tile.

Village is all set and ready for playing.

The Play

The flow of Village and the options available look a little like this :-

d10-1 Seed the Action Spaces – Village offers up 7 locations where actions can be taken and at 4 of these locations family members (meeple) can be placed.

To limit how many people can take each of these actions each turn, a number of cubes are placed at each location each turn.

The Set-up Tile that is being used for the game (based on the number of players) will outline how many cubes must be added to the green cloth bag and then how many are drawn out at random and placed at each location.

The bag will always feature the 6 black Plague Cubes in addition to the coloured cubes.

Therefore in each round the exact mix of Influence Cubes and how many Plague Cubes are in play will vary. The individual mix of cubes at each Action Space will also change throughout the game.

d10-2 Take Cubes – In turn order the players must then take their turn by taking a cube from any Action Space that still has some. Doing so will either earn a player an Influence Cube or a Plague Cube. The Influence Cubes come in four colours which represent; skills, persuasiveness, faith and knowledge. The Plague Cubes are black and represent illness which can shorten a family member’s life, thus costing a player 2 time, which is recorded by moving a player's Time Track marker along two spaces.

d10-3 Taking Actions – By taking a cube from a particular location a player gains access to the action bestowed by that Action Space.

They are :-

mb Grain Harvest – If a player has at least one family member still located on their Farmyard Tile, they are considered to be working the farm. By taking this action the farm creates 2 grain. This can be increased to 3 or 4 grain if a player has a horse and plough or ox and plough.

Grain can be sold at the Market, used to feed livestock in order to gain a horse or ox or sold for coin.

mb Family – The artwork at this location depicts a wedding and the benefit is to gain a family member, so it’s basically baby making without the hut. whistle

With this action a new meeple can be taken from the player’s supply and added to their farm ready to work for the family. When a new family member is gained, it must feature the lowest number still in the player’s supply. So a player will gain access to their generation two meeple before their third generation family members.

This action also allows a player to instead return a meeple from a location on the main board to their farm to be used for other purposes, which can be vital at key stages (especially if you screw your timing up).

Like most worker placement games, the more meeple one has, the more options they tend to have as they can allocate them to more locations and gain more benefits. The double edged sword though is that more meeple and more actions generally results in time moving faster (more on this in a moment).

mb Market –

Image Courtesy of EndersGame
There is only ever one cube located at the Market Action Space and when it is taken a Market Day takes place. This allows each player to try and sell things to customers. A set number of spaces will contain Customer Tiles and they display the things they wish to buy.

If a player has those goods and wishes to sell them, they return the goods and take the Customer Tile in question. Acquiring tiles at the Market in this way earns Prestige Points and is the main way to acquire VPs directly during play, making them very valuable.

The trade-off of course is that those goods; grain, livestock, farm equipment and scrolls can be used somewhere else for other means…so there is an opportunity cost in such a decision.

The player that triggers the Market Day gets to sell first and does not have to pay the cost of 1 green cube (persuasiveness) and 1 time to do so. The other players however do have to pay this cost. Once all players either cannot or do not wish to serve any more customers the Market Day comes to an end. The Customer Tiles are moved along in the cue to fill the empty spaces ready for the next round. By using a waiting cue the game allows the players to plan ahead to a degree rather than have the Market Day be a totally random affair.

It should also be noted that it is possible for a player to sell to more than one customer if they have the goods required. However each such sale incurs a further cost of 1 time and green cube. Should the player who triggered the Marker Day sell to a second customer, they too must pay this cost (only the first is free).

mb Crafts – Any Village worth its salt relies on a series of skilled craft-persons to create all manner of goods. By taking a cube from this location a player can gain access to a good. The goods include; Scrolls, Horses and Oxes, Ploughs, Gold and Wagons.

Once a cube is taken, the player must decide if they will train a family member or buy the good they want. By placing a meeple on a particular Craft Barn they dedicate that family member to making that good. They can take the corresponding good tile, but training takes time…more time initially as they need to be trained in the craft but on future turns the time required will be less. This cost must be paid by advancing their token around the Time Track.

Buying a good will not cost any time but will cost grain or a number of cubes (pink and orange, which represent skill and knowledge).

All of the goods are used at other locations. All things can be sold at the Market to various customers. Wagons are critical for traveling (see below), Scrolls help gain access to the Council Chambers, Ploughs and livestock can make farming more efficient and Gold can be used in several ways.




Image Courtesy of EndersGame



mb Council Chambers – The final three Action Spaces require the placement of a family member if they are to be accessed.

Taking a cube here allows a member of the family to enter the Council and gain influence over village matters. If a player already has one or more meeple in the Council they may instead decide to advance a single meeple rather than place a new meeple, which represents their rise within the political ranks. By doing so (moving up) different benefits can be accessed and at the end of the game a number of VPs are earned for having representation at levels 2-4.

The Council Chambers grants; the ‘Ring’, any two cubes of choice, a good tile of choice or VPs by cashing in coins (bribery anyone?). ninja

Whilst all benefits have their place, the ‘Ring’ in particular (kiss the ring gulp ) can be vital as it allows the player holding it to take the Start Player Token at the end of the round. This will allow a player to act first in the next round, change up the turn order and gain access to Action Spaces first.







Image Courtesy of EndersGame



mb Travel – This action allows a family member to set out for the great unknown and make their mark on the wider world. A series of towns and cities are featured and linked by various paths. A Family Member can move from one location to the next by paying a cost, which consists of; a Wagon, a set of 2 or 3 specific Influence Cubes and of course time. By moving a meeple to a new city a benefit is granted (gold, VPs etc.), but more importantly a family marker is placed to record the new achievement.

At the end of the game a player will earn a number of VPs based on how many cities a player manages to travel to. These points range from 1 to 18 and are significant. But of course to reach the max or near maximum number of cities will take significant resources and time, both of which could be spent elsewhere in the village. Hello tough decisions.

A player is able to allocate multiple family members to Travel but this will likely mean less meeple available to allocate elsewhere or work the farm.








Image Courtesy of EndersGame



mb Church – The final regular Action Space represents the Church, as religion and faith are important in village life. A cube can be taken from here with no further implications or a player may try to offer a Family Member to serve the Church. This will cost either a brown Influence Cube or 3 time. Once this cost is paid the player can add an available meeple to the black cloth bag.

At the end of the round 4 meeple will be drawn from the black cloth bag. This is called holding Mass. The bag always has 4 Monks (black meeple) in it at the start of Mass. If any of these are drawn they are simply set aside. If a player’s meeple is drawn it is admitted to the Church hierarchy and added to level one. In this way admission to the Church is not assured, although each player can pay 1 gold to guarantee that they are accepted to the Church (I won't pass any judgements here). The problem with allocating meeple to the bag though is that they will remain there until drawn, so it can limit a player’s options later on unless gold is paid to get them into the Church.

The main reason to enter the Church is to earn VPs. At the end of the game a player will earn VPs based on the level that each family member has reached. But at the end of each Mass a bonus 2 VPs are awarded to the player with the most meeple within the Church. If this is tied then the player with the family member at the highest rank of the Church earns the bonus VPs.

In this way the Church adds a directly competitive element to the game and a majority scoring mechanic.

mb Well – The Well tends to be used rather sparingly but it can be important. By paying 3 cubes of the same type, a player may access any Action Space. This can help a player to access an action without having to take a Plague Cube, should that be important or it can be used to access an action that has no cubes left and would otherwise be inaccessible.

d10-4 Ending A Round – A round comes to an end when the final cube is taken from the board’s Action Spaces. Therefore the players will be forced to take the Plague Cubes each and every turn and that can make turn order crucial.

As mentioned above, the Church bag must be resolved (Mass) and the player with the Ring returns it to the Council Chambers and takes the Start Player Token.

d10-5 Rinse and Repeat – A new round begins with the seeding of the cube bag and the placement of cubes to the various Action Spaces.

d10-6 Scoring – The players can of course earn VPs during play by selling things at the Market. However these are not revealed until the end of the game to help maintain the suspense right to the end. Earning the bonus for influence within the Church or by spending coin at the highest level of the Council are two other ways to gain direct access to VPs.

All other points are earned at the end of the game for a family’s success at traveling, positions held with the Council and Church and for making their mark in the Village Chronicle. What’s this I hear you ask?…Well it involves a look at the mechanic of Time, which sets Village apart in the genre of worker placement games.

d10-7 Time – The concept of time is something new to the worker placement genre and it plays a central role in the playing of Village. As I’ve mentioned above, many of the actions that are possible in the game require the expenditure of time. Then there is the Plague Cubes, which can essentially shorten the lifespan of family members as well.

Each player’s Farmyard Board features a time track around the outside. When the spending of time results in a player having to move their time marker over the stone bridge on the time track it means that it is ‘Time Up’ for one of your family members and they go to the big farmyard in the sky. This then leads to the second unique feature of the game…

d10-8 Death – In Village your hard working family members can die when their time comes to an end. When a player is forced to lose a family member they must choose one of the earliest generations to ‘move on’. That means a meeple with the lowest number that is still in play. The unfortunate soul that is lost can be taken from a player’s Farmyard Board or from a location on the board. Of course taking a meeple from the board will mean that whatever benefit they were accessing will be lost and it may also mean losing access to VPs that are bestowed at the end of the game (Church and Council Chambers).

Once a family member dies they can no longer be used. This makes the need to create new family members via the Family Action so important. It also gives real meaning to the careful selection of the actions as some actions cost far more time than others.

But hopefully your meeple have achieved something by the time they pass away…

d10-9 The Village Chronicle and the Cemetery –

Image Courtesy of EndersGame
Enter the Village Chronicle, which gives your little meeple a purpose. The Village Chronicle has a number of spaces available to honour the best village members in given fields such as; farming, craftsmanship, councillors, service to the Church, exploring etc. The number of spaces available in each field is set based on the number of players, which ensures that a good balance is assured and tough decisions must be made.

So get to the point Thomson! Ok, so when a player is forced to kill off a meeple they can add that ‘person’ to the Village Chronicle if they come from a field that still has a space available. Doing so represents a meeple having given valuable service to the village and being recognized in the history books.

Should a meeple be taken from a field/location that has no more room in the Chronicle, then they are simply added to the Village Cemetery and are largely forgotten as one of the ordinary plebs of life.

So what’s the big deal with the Chronicle? Well it represents the last chance in the game to earn a good number of VPs at the end of the game. Here VPs are awarded based on how many meeple a player/family can get into the Chronicle. A player must have at least 3 Family Members in the Chronicle to score some points and having 5 earns the maximum.

d10-1d10-0 Ending the Game – Unlike many a game, Village does not play to the end of a regular round structure before the game is over. The game comes to an end when either the last available space in the Village Chronicle or the Cemetery is filled. In this way the players have some control over the length of the game and can force a shorter game if they feel they are in a strong position. The last game I recall playing that allows for this is Puerto Rico with the colonist mechanic, but I play less Euros than the average BGG member, so this may be more common than I realise.

What Does it all Mean? The Appeal and Strategy of Village

Image Courtesy of marshduck


d10-1 Unique Elements – For me the biggest appeal besides being a Euro that does it well is the fact that it is unique in the mix of elements that it brings to the table. The concept of death and its importance is engaging and the requirement to manage one’s family generations is challenging. So many Euros can be a good time but can still feel like ‘just another euro’ or even ‘just another worker placement’. The feather in Village’s cap is that it made me sit up straight away and think, “Ok…we have something a little different here!” cool

So let’s look at those elements in a little more depth…

d10-2 Death…A Pleasant Reality – We’ve see the ‘feeding mechanic’ made famous by Stone Age several times in games, but Village takes it one step further in the reality of death and the loss of meeple. What makes this mechanic so neat is that not only is death unavoidable but it is actually desirable at times during the game. It’s desirable because the Village Chronicle represents a race to the grave of sorts. It is a direct form of player interaction in that the players need to race each other to get into the various fields. The key question the game asks though is, ‘When can you afford to lose that meeple and the benefit it is offering in order to secure that Chronicle position?’

Given that death is largely regarded as a ‘negative’ outcome to the human conscience, it is amusing to be halfway through that first game and suddenly realize…’Oh crap, I actually need to kill some of these family members off!

It’s really engaging game design.

d10-3 Managing the Family – Most worker placement games allow a player to simply allocate their meeple to locations. Some allow new meeple to be acquired via breeding and other means. Village does both of these but then adds death and the concept of generations. What transpires is the need to very carefully manage your family members. Benefits are great but without someone staying on the farm grain cannot be harvested. Actions and board based benefits are great but you will need different ones at different times. And the implementation of generations and death means that a player needs to allocate their meeple very carefully or they could lose a family member that was in place to gain end of game VPs. This lends Village a sharper edge over the competition in my opinion.

d10-4 The Cube Distribution and the Fates – Anyone who has followed my writing over the years will know that I like my themed games because they tend to build chance into their design. So it’s no surprise that I also like the Euros that also allow for a bit of chance. Village does this less so than the Dice Euros on the market but I do really like the random distribution of cubes to the board each turn. It just makes for that little bit of variance to keep the players on their toes and for me it is a one-up over Lords of Waterdeep where it is known that a given location will offer a set cube or benefit.

Often a player will need to take a key action in a given turn but they won’t always be certain that a juicy Influence Cube will be on offer. When the two line up…well that just brings a nice little smirk to the face. devil

d10-5 The Mix of Short and Long Term Objectives – Any good Euro tends to offer up short and long term objectives and Village does this well. The short term objectives are really in the form of the Market Day Customer Tiles. These are the only means of scoring a decent amount of VP’s in the course of the game. The delicious decision the game poses though is on when to sell goods (meaning they can’t be used for other means) and when to keep them and forgo the immediate VPs, possibly allowing another player to nab them.

Selling grain means it can’t be used to acquire livestock or pay for Church promotions, Wagons are needed for travel, Scrolls are needed in the Council Chambers and Ploughs help to create greater harvests. Selling Goods at Market Day is often overlooked in favour of the longer term objectives by new players to the game but they are very important.

There are one or two other in-game VP gains in the form of Church domination, reaching certain cities and paying for points at the highest point of the Council but the Market Day is really the most accessible.

The long term objectives are of course in pursuing the VPs that scale in relation to achievement such as travel and the Chronicle. As well as reaching the higher levels of the Church and Council Chambers.

When you put it all together Village offers up a thought provoking mix of short and long term objectives. It’s really why we game…it’s engaging problem solving. meeple

d10-6 Euro and Theme? – There is no doubt that Village is a Euro with its wooden cubes, worker placement and so on. But the theme here is a little more immersive than some Euros I feel because of those family generations...they make me a little more invested in what I'm doing because I want them to do well.

d10-7 Timing is Key – Unlike some worker placement games where a certain cube can be gained now or later and spent when it is convenient, in Village the timing is really important. If you want to make it into the Council Chambers you will need a Scroll or 2 green cubes. That gets you to thinking about how to get those things, which may mean creating a Scroll in the Crafts District. Doing things well is incredibly dependent on forward planning to ensure that you have the right items at the right time.

Of course the other players are forever taking vital cubes and actions so it is very important to think about Plan b and possibly c.

The result of all of the above is that Village takes just a little more thought than the average middle-weight Euro. It's not a heavy title by any means but it will be a more taxing affair to do well than say an Alhambra or a Saint Petersburg. This is because there are more variables that go into the scoring mix.

The Final Word

When all is said and done Village needs to be recognized as one of those titles that comes along every few years and shakes up the hobby in a small but significant way. It is one of those designs that throws new ideas into the ring and allows future designers to build upon and take ideas in new directions. The blend of mechanisms in play here and the introduction of family generations and the loss of workers does offer something substantially new in the worker placement Euro space.

Beyond that is the game a fun experience? You bet it is. Will it still be engaging and interesting after 5 and 10 plays? I think it will but the mileage a game has can be dependent on the nature of a play group sometimes. I do find that Village offers a little extra in the player interaction stakes, so provided you like the challenge of out-thinking your competition, then Village should have legs for some time to come. It’s also fair to say that Village takes at least 3-5 plays just to explore how each of the scoring combos and the mix of certain ones can influence your final score. This exploration is always good fun.

Of course there is the Village Inn expansion to help spice things up too. I have that in shrink and will get to in the coming months to see what it has to offer.

I am really happy to have found Village and I enjoy it each time it hits the table. It’s a little heavier than the I usual Euros I play but it isn't overwhelming at all and I really feel like I have tested by the end of a play.

Having looked at Markus and Inka’s design credits I see that they also created Saint Malo. Whilst I know that it will offer a very different experience, I am keen now to grab that off the shelf and take it for a spin. I have read a few comments over the years regarding the benefits of collaborative game design and it has certainly worked for the likes of Kramer & Kiesling and Moon and Weissblum over the years. It certainly worked here for the Brands and long may it continue if titles like Village are the end product.

Till next we meet may your family achieve great things and the Chronicle remember them forever…


Image Courtesy of EndersGame


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Lars Wagner Hansen
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Very nice review.

I did however find one error:
Neil Thomson wrote:

If a player has those goods and wishes to sell them, they return the goods and take the Customer Tile in question. Acquiring tiles at the Market in this way earns Prestige Points and is the main way to acquire VPs directly during play, making them very valuable.

d10-6 Scoring – The players can of course earn VPs during play by selling things at the Market, earning the bonus for influence within the Church or by spending coin at the highest level of the Council.

According to the rules customer tiles are scored at the end of the game:
Rulebook page 12 wrote:
Customer tiles
At the end of the game, each player reveals their concealed customer tiles and receives the prestige points printed on them.
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Thanks for the review Neil - a good writeup and I agree with your points.

At first glance it looks like yet another 'worker placement' game but when playing with you guys I was surprised to find it was actually a bit brain-burning at times - much deeper than at first glance. Looking forward to more plays in the future. meeple
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John R.
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Neil Thomson wrote:
mb Well – The Well tends to be used rather sparingly but it can be important. By paying 3 cubes of the same type, a player may access any action where a cube is still present. This can help a player to access an action without having to take a Plague Cube, should that be important.

An important clarification:

Quote:
By the way: This is the only way to perform an action when there is no cube left on the corresponding space.

The well is (also) used to take an action when there are no longer any cubes left on the space as long as there is at least one cube still on the board (i.e. the turn has not ended). For example, you can play 3 cubes to the Well to trigger another Market.

I had, for some reason, never realized that the Well can be used to take an action in an area where there are cubes remaining (e.g. plague cubes) and I thank you for pointing that out.


This is one of my favourite games because of the meeple death rules and the inversion of the normal 'play a worker to take a resource' mechanic of Stone Age and Lords of Waterdeep.
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Thanks fellas - corrections made and up to date.
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Mark
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Man, your reviews get better and better. Between you and Ender, BGG is a powerhouse!
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CanCon, BunnyCon...BorderCon!!!
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May 2018 be all you dreamed it would be and be all that you dreamed...
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Noogs wrote:
Man, your reviews get better and better. Between you and Ender, BGG is a powerhouse!


Cheers Mark - Many nights spent at my boy's soccer and football training sessions.

Thanks to Ender to for this review - I used more than a few of his images but they were simply the best ones.
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Mark Papenfuss
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"Your results are back: it's negative"......um, is that a bad thing?
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Another fantastic review.

Fortunately, I already own this game so this review didn't compel me to rush over to Amazon and buy it like some of yours in the past (I'm looking at you Memoir expansions).thumbsup

I really like Village, it is a well designed game with cute components. It doesn't hit the table nearly as much as games that I have ranked much lower (I have Village at 8.75), mainly due to fact that my two main gaming partners, my wife and oldest son, do not enjoy it very much (though my oldest daughter thinks its good---so she's the one that plays it with me the most).

I think there is some serious starting inertia with Village, and that with multiple plays it becomes much easier/clearer to get a cohesive strategy going---but if someone doesn't find the game "fun", it's hard to get over that hump.

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mpappy wrote:
I think there is some serious starting inertia with Village, and that with multiple plays it becomes much easier/clearer to get a cohesive strategy going---but if someone doesn't find the game "fun", it's hard to get over that hump.



That has probably been our experience as well Mark come to think of it. I'm keen but it isn't requested by some mates as much as I would like.
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Mike Cuypers
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A very nice review! Well written, well explained. Me likey likey.

I don't understand why this game doesn't get more buzz. It's a very strategic game and easy to get into. Fun and pleasant. I think it isn't well known because it's everything... Jack of All trades... Master of none...
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T. S. Higgins
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Il_Falco wrote:
A very nice review! Well written, well explained. Me likey likey.

I don't understand why this game doesn't get more buzz. It's a very strategic game and easy to get into. Fun and pleasant. I think it isn't well known because it's everything... Jack of All trades... Master of none...


I've tried Village twice now, once with just my wife, and once with both my wife and our oldest. The reactions were much the same in both attempts. It was seen as too slow, too difficult to get enough cubes, and nobody felt like they were accomplishing anything.

I've heard that it takes a few turns to really get things going, but in game one we only managed to get the first round in before we put it away, and in game two it only lasted to the end of the second round. I think it's pretty well dead for us at this point, as it just was a non-starter. We also picked up Caverna about the same time, which may be another factor, as it scratches the same itch but just seems like a far better fit.
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