Recommend
3 
 Thumb up
 Hide
11 Posts

BoardGameGeek» Forums » Gaming Related » Do It Yourself

Subject: Print and Play Games - newbie advise rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Tom Wells

Gilbert
Arizona
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
I have never attempted printing any print and play games. Not sure what materials, card stock, etc that I should use. Different size card stock, etc?

I assume you can find everything at Staples or Office Max but is there some better sources for materials?

Appreciate your advise.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Keith Sink
United States
Seattle
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Checked the pinned topic at the top of the forum. Lots of resources there.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Angel Walker
United States
Johns Creek
Georgia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The pinned topic at the top of the forum is fantastic, but it can be overwhelming for a newbie.

My suggested starting supply list:

Color laser or inkjet printer
Card stock - I use 110 pound 8.5" x 11" from OfficeMax
Laminating machine - amazon has great prices
Laminating pockets - found some at Hobby Lobby & used a 40% off coupon
Paper cutter - can be found at Michael's or Hobby Lobby
Martha Stewart Scoring board - 12.5"
Card sleeves in standard and mini sizes

I am also very fortunate to have a Silhouette Cameo machine. Amazon has it on sale today. This thing rocks. I cut out chipboard and card stock on it. Can't say enough about this machine. It is a splurge, but well worth it if you are going to do a lot of cutting.

As far as adhesives go, I have been using an extra strength glue stick for most of my projects, but I have recently purchased spray adhesive since I've seen it mentioned so many times on BBG.

I think Hobby Lobby has a better selection of supplies than Michael's. Especially small wooden pieces and chipboard.

I'm sure I am missing something. There are great resources online for supplies. thegamecrafter.com is a great place to start.

I hope this has been helpful!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Nick Hayes
United States
Los Angeles
California
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The great thing about this hobby is that you don't need anything special to start building and enjoying games.

Print out the files on your home printer, glue them to some spare cardboard you have laying around (or in the recycle bin - cereal boxes work great), and you're done!

Once you try that, you may decide you want to get into some sturdier materials, higher quality prints, etc. And that's fine, just don't feel you have to start there. Just start printing, gluing, and cutting!
8 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jake Staines
United Kingdom
Grantham
Lincolnshire
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The tools I use consistently are:

- Sharp knife (I use an Olfa 'Art Knife') and/or rotary cutter if you can get to grips with one (I use a 45mm Olfa model).
- Steel ruler (for running the knife/rotary cutter along to cut straight lines; helps if it's cork-backed).
- Self-healing cutting mat (to avoid scarring the table with the above cutting).
- Colour printer (the colour part isn't essential, of course. I use a nice colour laser, inkjet would also work fine.)

Materials I use most of the time are:

- Full-sheet labels are the easiest way to get printed matter stuck onto tokens or boards; you can get boxes of them in Staples or other office-supply shops.
- Comic and magazine backing boards are a good cheap alternative to the greyboard. They're not so thick and they're buffered white on one side (which isn't a bad thing), and if you buy them without the mylar bags they're a pretty affordable source of good-quality card.
- 3M craft-mount or super-77 spray glue is great for sticking anything other than the labels to things. Anything that's permanent and not 'repositionable' is fine.
- self-adhesive plastic laminate (cheaper and more flexible than a hot laminator and pockets; comes in glossy or matt).
- 2mm greyboard makes the best tokens or board sections; it's the stuff bookbinders use for hardback book covers, and you can get it from proper stationers and book-binding suppliers. Mounting board (mat board in the US) isn't a terrible substitute, but some people reckon it peels apart too easily.

Also look out for old board games in charity shops and car boot sales (or local equivalent) - maybe even on eBay. Check on BGG first, but they're often a good source of wooden or plastic components that you can repurpose to PnP ends, the board can be re-used to mount a PnP game board and the box can be covered in labels or spray-glue-adhered kraft paper or something to make a nice box for your PnP efforts.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
wolfkin
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
stagingmaster wrote:
I am also very fortunate to have a Silhouette Cameo machine. Amazon has it on sale today. This thing rocks. I cut out chipboard and card stock on it. Can't say enough about this machine. It is a splurge, but well worth it if you are going to do a lot of cutting


This one?

1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chad Steward
United States
Kent
WA - Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
If you are going for cheap, this is the way to do it.
Penny sleeves + free library color printing + magic the gathering cards or cardstock in between the sheets.

Only like 2-4 cents a card this way.
3 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom McThorn
United States
Newark
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
For my PnP I use:
Color laser printer at work
Olfa Rotary cutter (basically a pizza cutter that's a razor)
Cutting mat
3m 77 spray glue (not cheap but worth the $$)
Arch punches (have 2) for round counters.
A few of the smaller craft punches (but they don't work that great)
Paper is 110# cardstock, works great for cards and is really nice folded over and glued together for double sided cards

I've tried laminating and the self adhesive laminate sheets but what I found best is spray clear coat (flat.) I've used the wal-mart brand and also krylon and it works great. I'll print, glue, spray, then cut out pieces.

Another thing that can add depth is using old scrabble letter tiles to mount counters on. You can usually find them at garage sales for $2-$4 each.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Angel Walker
United States
Johns Creek
Georgia
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yes, that is it. It is mainly used by crafters and scrapbookers, but I use it to cut out counters, cards and tuck boxes. My AHA moment with this machine was when I used it to cut out an Eclipse population cube grid out of chipboard. I don't play Eclipse enough to warrant the expense of an acrylic tray.

The software allows you to print and then cut. I can now import PDFs into the software and set up my cut lines. The results are really good.

If my Silhouette broke, I would replace it.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim O'Connor
United States
Carson City
Nevada
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
When I do prototypes for testing:

• 6-color printer
• Staples brand Photo Supreme Matte Double-Sided
(comes in 8.5 x 11" and 13 x 19")
• Xacto Knife
• Metal Ruler
• Self-Healing Cutting Mat
• Card Sleeves

For boards get custom cut chip board, then laminate print-out with spray adhesive, then matte sealing spray. If multiple pieces, use binder's tape.

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jim O'Connor
United States
Carson City
Nevada
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
stagingmaster wrote:
I am also very fortunate to have a Silhouette Cameo machine. Amazon has it on sale today. This thing rocks. I cut out chipboard and card stock on it. Can't say enough about this machine. It is a splurge, but well worth it if you are going to do a lot of cutting.


I have a larger Silhouette that has been gathering dust, never used because I didn't think it could handle chipboard. What thickness chipboard are you using?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.