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Subject: Let's start at the beginning... Heroclix rss

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Regular Boardgames.. yes. Deckbuilders.. yes.
Heroclix.. outside of turning the base to keep track of hit points I have no idea what it is.
If I wanted to try it out how do I get started?
Looking at MM I see they sell all kinds of figures, maps and terrain pieces.
What do need? Is there a beginner set that has directions, maps and figures to get you started or is everything bought individually?
Thanks

 
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josh willhite
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There are all sorts of "clix" games out there, some still in print, others out. Generally they're easy to get your hands on a pile. There are of course a bunch of different starter sets for each type of clix game. I mean, there's heroclix, horrorclix, haloclix, crimson skies, mech warrior, and a bunch of others. as the clix change the model can get better or worse (e.g. your dude isn't as powerful after getting knocked around).

I could never get into them as I paint my own miniatures (28mm tabletop wargames), these are prepainted and not always the best paint job. They seem to me to be a mix of boardgame and tabletop game, but I'd rather just play a tabletop game if I want little dudes moving around attacking your little dudes. Some of the clix games are randomly packaged too, which I don't care for. I've had a few of the guys rip off their base as I try to turn that little dial too. One good thing is I've noticed you can pick up huge lots of them over at Ebay (so they wont cost you the price of a car to get started, unlike Warhammer 40k).
 
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Matt Brown
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There are starter sets. After that you buy boosters similar to Magic. You might want to hit up a FLGS to see if they host any game days for it. I know one does here locally. This way you can get a feel for it before diving in.
 
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Waspinator
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You want starter sets. If you can find them at a good price, get the Avengers and X-Men sets from the recent Heroclix Avengers vs X-Men series. That will give you two good balanced sets of figures.

There's also a Batman and a Superman quick-start kit. They don't have the full rules, but are cheap.
 
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John H
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I will echo the above posts on the starter sets. Your best bet is to search for starter sets on MM. The starter set should include at least 1 map, some tokens, figures, and a rulebook-- everything to get you started.

Choose one with heroes that appeal to you. (I like DC myself, so I'd recommend the Man of Steel starter set, Blackest Night starter, or the Legion of Superheroes starter set, all much, much cheaper than the Avengers vs Xmen. That's by far the most expensive starter). If you like Tolkien, the Lord of the Rings starter set is a really great value, with lots of extras. Be forewarned that Tolkien clix are fewer in number than superhero clix, and may be a little bit harder/pricier to come by, but not to extremes.

After that, "Fast Forces Packs" are often a great buy. They are usually 6 figures from a team or theme that give you instant playability out of the box (assuming you have the rules) with a new map to play on for those specific figures. The figures are usually very well done in these packs, and there is a much wider selection than the starter sets.

8-35$ will get you a starter set, and 8-20 dollars will get you a fast forces set. Troll & Toad tends to have a bit more Heroclix stock on hand than Miniature Market, so you may want to check more choices there.

If you're just looking to play casually with friends, you don't need to explore much further other than to buy whatever figs of your favorite characters you like. If you want to support your FLGS, by all means buy some booster packs from them as the store retailers are the lifeblood of this game, but buying blind booster packs is the WORST way to buy heroclix online. You can choose whatever individual figures or fixed fast forces sets you want from several online retailers or ebay. There is no need to do the blind booster buys at all unless you're supporting a retailer.

Wizkids website has latest rules sets posted online too for your perusal. You can get good, clear, basic info on the game from the Heroclix World website. The best website to check out for news and detailed discussions is hcrealms.com, but be forewarned-- most posters are longtime veterans. It does have the best info and great threads for beginners if you can find them among all the other chatter.

Good luck!
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gamezendo.com wrote:
I will echo the above posts on the starter sets. Your best bet is to search for starter sets on MM. The starter set should include at least 1 map, some tokens, figures, and a rulebook-- everything to get you started.

Choose one with heroes that appeal to you. (I like DC myself, so I'd recommend the Man of Steel starter set, Blackest Night starter, or the Legion of Superheroes starter set, all much, much cheaper than the Avengers vs Xmen. That's by far the most expensive starter). If you like Tolkien, the Lord of the Rings starter set is a really great value, with lots of extras. Be forewarned that Tolkien clix are fewer in number than superhero clix, and may be a little bit harder/pricier to come by, but not to extremes.

After that, "Fast Forces Packs" are often a great buy. They are usually 6 figures from a team or theme that give you instant playability out of the box (assuming you have the rules) with a new map to play on for those specific figures. The figures are usually very well done in these packs, and there is a much wider selection than the starter sets.

8-35$ will get you a starter set, and 8-20 dollars will get you a fast forces set. Troll & Toad tends to have a bit more Heroclix stock on hand than Miniature Market, so you may want to check more choices there.

If you're just looking to play casually with friends, you don't need to explore much further other than to buy whatever figs of your favorite characters you like. If you want to support your FLGS, by all means buy some booster packs from them as the store retailers are the lifeblood of this game, but buying blind booster packs is the WORST way to buy heroclix online. You can choose whatever individual figures or fixed fast forces sets you want from several online retailers or ebay. There is no need to do the blind booster buys at all unless you're supporting a retailer.

Wizkids website has latest rules sets posted online too for your perusal. You can get good, clear, basic info on the game from the Heroclix World website. The best website to check out for news and detailed discussions is hcrealms.com, but be forewarned-- most posters are longtime veterans. It does have the best info and great threads for beginners if you can find them among all the other chatter.

Good luck!


Thanks. Just what I was looking for. Instead of just searching for 'Heroclix' at MM and getting page after page of confusing things, I put in 'Heroclix starter' and just got all the starter sets. Looks like for $8. I can give it a try to see if I like it.
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Bill Galloway
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ddandb wrote:

Thanks. Just what I was looking for. Instead of just searching for 'Heroclix' at MM and getting page after page of confusing things, I put in 'Heroclix starter' and just got all the starter sets. Looks like for $8. I can give it a try to see if I like it.


I looked at MM's heroclix webpage. The $8.00 starter set called "Hypertime" is from the very first edition of the rules, in 2002. Not a good purchase. Since then, the game has been rewritten and improved at least five or six times. If you aren't buying the starter set because you're a big fan of the characters inside, then the main reason to get one is for a nicely printed and up-to-date rulebook and PAC card.

I would really recommend (from the perspective of someone who's lived through all those rewrites) that you get a newer set, like the movie-related starters from Iron Man 3, Thor or Man of Steel. The extra 11 dollars would be worth it just so you aren't learning a version of the game that was made obsolete in 2004. I really enjoy the latest versions of the maps and rules much more than the first few editions. In an old starter, the glue on the stickers inside each character's dial might have dried up and come loose after all this time.

On the same site there is an $8.00 starter set called "Legion of Super-Heroes" which will have a newer, nicer-looking map and figures -- but in that case you should print out the two essentials (the modern rulebook and PAC card) from the heroclix.com website.

The advice I always give to people interested in heroclix:
- The best way to learn is find a store hosting a clix tournament and tell the "Judge" that you're a new player. Most players I've met are happy to teach the game... and possibly give you some of their extras. If you can't find a local venue, buy some cheap pieces and a map and sit down with a friend to learn it together.
- The collectible model WizKids uses means that most figures are very cheap on the secondary market (ebay, trollandtoad, hcrealms.com's Sales forum): "Commons" for about $0.25-.50, "Uncommons" for $1.00, "Rares" for $1-5, and "Super-Rares" for $5-20.
- Get a free map from a game store, print out the rules, find some glass beads or coins (to represent tokens or smoke bombs or a Dumpster for the Incredible Hulk to grab and throw at General Zod), and the game can be very cheap indeed. You could play a hundred times or more just by fielding some of the vast number of Commons produced in the last five or six years.
- Figures from 2002-2008 (there's a copyright date under every figure's base) won't be much fun to play with because newer figures are much stronger and a lop-sided match might quickly end the game and your interest in it.
- If you find you like the game, a new starter set is coming in August and that's the first thing I'd tell you to buy. Adding these yearly starter sets to the 3-5 "Fast Forces" sets produced each year means you don't ever have to buy a random booster box or single-figure pack. For those who dislike the blind-purchase collectible model, the clear-packed Fast Forces are a good alternative.

Okay, that's a lot more than I planned to write, but I hope some of it is useful. Good luck!
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Yes, it was the Hypertime that I got. So is it completely worthless? Will it work with the newer sets? Beings the sites selling Heroclix don't say what year they were made how can you tell if you are buying a newer set?

Thanks
 
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Matt Brown
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bill_galloway wrote:
Since then, the game has been rewritten and improved at least five or six times.


Also part of the turnoff I have with the game. My friend loves the game and even he admitted he got tired of the changes.
 
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matthean wrote:
bill_galloway wrote:
Since then, the game has been rewritten and improved at least five or six times.


Also part of the turnoff I have with the game. My friend loves the game and even he admitted he got tired of the changes.


But how can you tell what you are buying? Is there somewhere that list manufacture dates of sets and individual figures?
 
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Bill Galloway
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ddandb wrote:
matthean wrote:
bill_galloway wrote:
Since then, the game has been rewritten and improved at least five or six times.


Also part of the turnoff I have with the game. My friend loves the game and even he admitted he got tired of the changes.


But how can you tell what you are buying? Is there somewhere that list manufacture dates of sets and individual figures?


There's a decent online community of heroclix players, and that site has a Units Section webpage that displays a bar with every set ever released, from newest to oldest. You can click on each set's icon to compare all 4,000+ figures.
http://www.hcrealms.com/index.php?page=units

I guess there are two ways of looking at this game.

(1) You buy the game in order to play with friends who already collect it, or to join a group or a venue (like a comic shop) where you can play in weekly or monthly tournaments. In this case, if you start to enjoy the ever-changing sets and the sense of discovering what new powers and characters appear every 3 months, then you might have to keep buying new pieces and keep up with new rules changes.

(2) You buy the game to have a box of figures on your shelf to play, somewhere in between your copies of Carcassonne or Netrunner or Steam. In this case, it doesn't matter how old the pieces are that you get. You can still have fun with the game, and if you aren't a collector or weekly player who cares how "new" the fun you're having is?

Just try to use pieces that are all from roughly the same time period. (If you own only Hypertime figures, try to get figures from similar-aged sets, like "Infinity Challenge", "Xplosion" or "Cosmic Justice" - which I've seen as low as ten cents apiece depending on where you look.) That way all the figures will be roughly balanced. Print out one set of rules and stick to it. I strongly recommend the 2013 or 2014 version of the rules, because a lot has been removed for simplicity's sake, and the stuff that was added for complexity's sake (powers like Improved Movement, Indomitable, Sharpshooters, etc) won't be on the figures you own. Best of both worlds there.

If you use the old version of the rules because that's what came in the box, oh well. Go for it. It was a good enough game at the time so you won't hate playing. I just think that like many small game companies, the designers and rulemakers learned a lot as they grew. But there's no rule that says you have to keep up.

My collection has new pieces (that come with cards) and old ones. I just keep them separate and get two different playing experiences out of it. The older figures are easier to learn the game and easier to play, while the new ones have shorter lifespans but more complicated powers.
 
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Thank you Bill. Just what I needed.
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