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Subject: Attack resolution in hex and counter games rss

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Herb
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Forgive a neophyte, I know not what I am trying to ask.

What is split on hex and counter games using the following attack resolution:

(1) Rolling dice
spinner, some other random mechanism...

(2) Points system
Move my army within attack distance to yours. My army has 100 "attack" points, you have 50 "defend" point so I win.

---------

I'm trying to get educated on a couple of things here:

(1) Attack resolution mechanisms that involve attack resolution using some sort of random mechanism to resolve the attack.

What kinds of mechanism are used?

(2) Do hex-and-counter games generally have perfect information on strength of unit being attacked?

Seems like some "random" element would replicate "fog of war". So I attack your 10 men with 25 and I am probably going to win. Thinking sort of like Risk, which I know isn't hex-and-counter.

Or is it - $hit your 10 guys are in two tanks!!




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Bill Lawson
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1) usually 6 dice

2)Some games have FOW and some don't. Far more of the newer games have FOW than in the past. Most of the ones I personally play have some kind of FOW.
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Hunga Dunga
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Some games let you inspect stacks of counters, some do not. If you can't inspect stacks, you won't know until the last moment what the odds will be.
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Mike Szarka
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There are two major means of handling this. One is based on a matrix, commonly known as a Combat Results Table "CRT" which lists a different range of results for die rolls at different attacker : defender ratios. The other most common system is the "buckets of dice" system where you roll a die for every strength point and a certain roll (e.g. a "6") results in a single hit. The combat may stop after one round or go for multiple rounds depending on the game.
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Daniel Kaufman
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There's a new game from MMP called Salerno where I believe the FOW extends to the attacker as well, and untested units do not have combat strength revealed to either side until first combat. That gets to your second question.

For your first question, I've seen games use cards to resolve random attacks, such as D-Day at Omaha Beach.
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Randall Shaw
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CRTs can also use differentials (ie a '3' attacking a '1' would use the +2 section of the chart).
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Enrico Viglino
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mcszarka wrote:
There are two major means of handling this. One is based on a matrix, commonly known as a Combat Results Table "CRT" which lists a different range of results for die rolls at different attacker : defender ratios. The other most common system is the "buckets of dice" system where you roll a die for every strength point and a certain roll (e.g. a "6") results in a single hit. The combat may stop after one round or go for multiple rounds depending on the game.


Mostly - except Buckets of Dice is a special case of the second type
of combat system - which is firepower tables. The advantage of BoD
vs many firepower table systems is that the results on the 'table'
are simplified enough that you don't need a chart.
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Jason Cawley
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Most common is an odds CRT with columns for odds levels, sometimes with shifts for various forms of advantage besides numbers. That determines the range of possible outcomes and likely results, and the attacker usually knows that much in advance. Then roll a die to determine which actual result occurs.

More involved tactical systems may feature multiple random determinations "treeing out" what happens - a shot hits, where does it hit, does it penetrate that armor, what does it do behind armor, does the target crew panic, etc. A very common variant if this is for a CRT result to just force some sort of check by the units hit, which has serious results if they fail and little or mot result if they pass.

Others have mentioned "bucket of dice" systems which just let each bit of the army fire at defenders, resulting in a binomial distribution of outcomes, spread around a knowable expectation, but spread quite widely. Thus has the effect of making battle outcomes less predictable and less determined by numbers, more by chance, on single occasions. Overall results over many combat are however nearly forced to follow a linear expectation. So the "noise" is strictly a small scale thing.

These are not the only systems used, however. One of the oldest wargames just used a sort of paper scissors rock of simultaneous hidden choice - defender chooses linear defense, or refuse flank, or retreat etc, while attacker chooses frontal assault or flanking maneuver or probe etc. The mutual choice determines a cell in a table which takes the place of a die roll in the above systems.

Some card driven strategy games use mechanics based on hidden cards played to decide the combat, though it is more common for the to just have certain cards that can skew the chances or throw extra dice or similar. Some games use card drawing in place of a die roll - turn over an odds card and the attack succeeds if the odds in the actual combat equal or exceed what is printed on the drawn card.

But all those are non mainstream, corner cases these days...
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Robert Stuart
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herace wrote:
(1) Attack resolution mechanisms that involve attack resolution using some sort of random mechanism to resolve the attack.

What kinds of mechanism are used?


All hex and counter wargames I have played use dice, with the exception of the massively unsuccessful Avalon Hill game Kriegspiel, for which attack resolution was based on a rock-paper-scissors type system.

herace wrote:
(2) Do hex-and-counter games generally have perfect information on strength of unit being attacked?


Generally, no. Many do have perfect information but some do not allow the opposing player to examine an enemy stack, for a few the units start with hidden strengths which are only revealed at the unit's first battle, and one system I've played, the Armored Knights system (e.g., (Armored Knights North Africa: Operation Crusader), introduces a variable strength factor based on a die roll made after both players have committed their units to battle.


Regarding non hex-and-counter wargames:

Bowen Simmons' three games have determined outcomes based on information which is hidden (from the opposing player).

Block games, except for the Simmons games, use dice to resolve combat but have hidden information.
 
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