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Subject: SOLAR FREAKIN ROADWAYS rss

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Josh Jennings
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https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/solar-roadways
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"that's a smith and wesson, and you've had your six"
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¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
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Chestermere
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Life lesson: Hamsters are NOT diswasher safe.
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Very nifty.
But locally, we could get more snow in one minute than a bunch of those could melt in an hour. So the claim about snow and ice-free roads is a dream.
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Fire Lord
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This looks interesting, but I've got to wonder how much these would cost. They don't appear to want to answer that question yet.
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Paul DeStefano
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MABBY wrote:
Very nifty.
But locally, we could get more snow in one minute than a bunch of those could melt in an hour. So the claim about snow and ice-free roads is a dream.


No one cares about Canada.
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Josh Jennings
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I'm thinking that it's pretty expensive to produce them on the small scale that they are. I think that the cost can be reduced significantly through economy of scale. Either way, they would still be pretty expensive. My real question though is with regards to failure rate. Will they be able to generate enough energy to pay for themselves over their average lifespan? Or will they need to be replaced often enough that they are not economically feasible. If they can make them durable and efficient enough then it makes sense to install these.
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kSwingrÜber
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My "Bullshit Meter" is getting a pretty high reading on this.
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George Kinney
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thermogimp wrote:
My real question though is with regards to failure rate. Will they be able to generate enough energy to pay for themselves over their average lifespan? Or will they need to be replaced often enough that they are not economically feasible. If they can make them durable and efficient enough then it makes sense to install these.


Given the condition of local roads most of the time, my money is on them being installed to great fanfare, then becoming a public embarrassment within a season or two for whatever politician bullies them through since that installation almost certainly won't come with any maintenance money. (like current road projects...)

And they're going to be pumping high currents at ground level...first kid that runs out into the road to grab their ball and gets fried to a crisp and it's all over but the lawsuits.

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Jeff
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I need to learn to hack these so I can spell out stuff on the roads...

(sigh - can you imagine the advertisements? And I though billboards were bad...)
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Josh Jennings
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Gecko23 wrote:
thermogimp wrote:
My real question though is with regards to failure rate. Will they be able to generate enough energy to pay for themselves over their average lifespan? Or will they need to be replaced often enough that they are not economically feasible. If they can make them durable and efficient enough then it makes sense to install these.


Given the condition of local roads most of the time, my money is on them being installed to great fanfare, then becoming a public embarrassment within a season or two for whatever politician bullies them through since that installation almost certainly won't come with any maintenance money. (like current road projects...)

And they're going to be pumping high currents at ground level...first kid that runs out into the road to grab their ball and gets fried to a crisp and it's all over but the lawsuits.



Well, it depends on how sturdy most of the material is. The cause of most potholes is from ground water creating a soft spot under the pavement, allowing heavy traffic to slowly rock the pavement back and forth over and extended period. It sounds like many of these issues would not be nearly as large with solar roadways. Let's look at the list of main causes from Wikipedia:

Wikipedia wrote:
1. Insufficient pavement thickness to support traffic during freeze/thaw periods without localized failures.
2. Insufficient drainage.
3. Failures at utility trenches and castings (manhole and drain casings).
4. Miscellaneous pavement defects and cracks left unmaintained and unsealed so as to admit moisture and compromise the structural integrity of the pavement.


1. These panels are typically much thicker than the concrete that we currently lay down for most roadways.
2. The panels have built-in drainage as mentioned in the video.
3. There may still be an issue with manhole/drainage casings with solar roadways. That wasn't really addressed in the video.
4. This is the main concern. I don't know how easily the tempered glass surface would crack and what effect that would have on the roadway. One solution you could probably implement is to have a sensor that would detect when the glass itself has a defect and perhaps to what level. Then you could have a maintenance period where you replace individual panels that have defects at a certain threshold.

As for high currents at ground level, the panels are sealed with tempered glass which is a very good insulator. Most of the current then runs at the bottom of the panel down through the shaft beneath the roadway. I think it's definitely a concern, but one that can be safeguarded against and would be less dangerous than the risk of power lines coming down and becoming a huge hazard.
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kswingruber wrote:

My "Bullshit Meter" is getting a pretty high reading on this.


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