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Subject: Longest Route Question rss

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H C
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I've googled this a lot and I still can't find a single, concrete answer.

I have a large series of carts that go through a series of cities. It literally forms a figure 8 loop (using, say, 30 carts to make the figure 8 loop) through the country. Is my "longest" route every cart in this figure 8 loop (aka 30 for my longest route)?

Lets say the bottom circle of the 8 uses 20 carts and the top uses 10. Should I only count the bottom 20 carts as my longest route?

Let's say another player had a continuous 25 train carts. Who gets the longest route?

Also, can the longest route go through the same city multiple times? Assuming the route uses different train tracks each time?

(This came up in a game I played last night where we decided not to score the longest route since we couldn't agree. It was in contention between me and the 3rd place player and we ultimately didn't give the 10 points to anyone. I got in second with 104 points against first who had 107. I had thought the whole time I would get longest route with my several-looped train tracks. So it was really something that could've changed the outcome)
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Mr Gumby
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As long as you count each train only once and as long as each train connects to another train of yours, you can loop through as many cities as you want. As far as I know.

Regards.
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Max DuBoff
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Welcome to BGG, Hua!


As for your question, the rules answer it more clearly than I would:

Ticket to Ride rules wrote:
The player who has the Longest Continuous Path of routes receives this special bonus card and adds 10 points to his score. When evaluating and comparing path lengths, only take into account continuous lines of plastic trains of the same color. A continuous path may include loops, and pass through the same city several times, but a given plastic train may never be used twice in the same continuous path.


That's from the last page of the rules. So, in conclusion, you were totally right and you now have the right to rub your glorious win in your friends' face.
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Jason Webster
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NowOrNever88 wrote:
I've googled this a lot and I still can't find a single, concrete answer.

I have a large series of carts that go through a series of cities. It literally forms a figure 8 loop (using, say, 30 carts to make the figure 8 loop) through the country. Is my "longest" route every cart in this figure 8 loop (aka 30 for my longest route)?

Lets say the bottom circle of the 8 uses 20 carts and the top uses 10. Should I only count the bottom 20 carts as my longest route?

Let's say another player had a continuous 25 train carts. Who gets the longest route?

Also, can the longest route go through the same city multiple times? Assuming the route uses different train tracks each time?

(This came up in a game I played last night where we decided not to score the longest route since we couldn't agree. It was in contention between me and the 3rd place player and we ultimately didn't give the 10 points to anyone. I got in second with 104 points against first who had 107. I had thought the whole time I would get longest route with my several-looped train tracks. So it was really something that could've changed the outcome)


You had longest route. A figure 8 of 30 trains ( no matter how big the top or bottom loop is) is a longest train of 30 trains
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H C
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Hmm, really appreciate the responses everyone!

How does a loop work for longest route though? Can the longest city go from city A back to the same city A in a loop? Or do I count the longest route as A's chain without the smallest link?

EX: Longest route is NY to NJ to Philly.
NY->NJ is 5 trains
NJ->Philly is 4 trains
Phily->NY is 3 trains

Is the longest route here 5+4+3 = 12 trains (which would be NY->NJ->Philly->NY)?
Or is the longest route 9 trains (which would be NY->NJ->Philly)?

It just seemed a bit weird that the route doesn't take you anywhere different.
 
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Eddie the Cranky Gamer
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As long as you count each train only once and as long as each train connects to another train of yours

I'm not sure how much simpler an explanation can get.
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Steven Bergman
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Think of it as taking a length of rope. You can bring the ends together to form a circle, the rope is still the same length. You can then pinch in two sides such that they are touching (trains going through the same city), the length of the rope remains the same.
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Sven F.
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apotheos wrote:
As long as you count each train only once and as long as each train connects to another train of yours

I'm not sure how much simpler an explanation can get.


I do not agree. That explanation alone would include the network system of TtR Legendary Asia. So although it's simple, it might be misunderstood.

The rope example, however, seems perfect to me.
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Eddie the Cranky Gamer
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Fomalhaut wrote:
apotheos wrote:
As long as you count each train only once and as long as each train connects to another train of yours with no backtracking

I'm not sure how much simpler an explanation can get.


I do not agree. That explanation alone would include the network system of TtR Legendary Asia. So although it's simple, it might be misunderstood.

The rope example, however, seems perfect to me.


Fair enough. Corrected for clarity.
 
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Mr Gumby
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Sorry, I haven't played Legendary Asia. But aren't we talking about USA?
 
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Eddie the Cranky Gamer
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It was correctly observed that my statement, omitting without backtracking as a clarification, would be true for non-contiguous routes such as those that score the bonus on Legendary Asia.

Somewhat of a redundancy, as when counting to compete for longest train if you want to go down a side spur of your line thats fine....but it'll probably not have as many trains and you won't be winning for the problem this thread was trying to solve.

So it was technically an accurate observation, based on a game that doesn't even have a longest train award. I was attempting to make a logical statement that was functionally equivalent to the rope metaphor, so I'm fine with shoring it up a little.
 
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