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Subject: Person loses challenge because of Skull in their own pile - who choses the card lost? rss

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Will Yum
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There was some confusion yesterday about one of the rules.

Mark won the bid and flipped over his cards first. He had a Skull in his own pile of cards and that made him lose the challenge. So he had to lose a card.

Does Mark lose a random card from his hand?

Or does Mark get to pick one of his cards to lose?


The rules say that if a person loses a challenge because of a Skull in his own pile, he secretly chooses a card to discard/take out of the game. The French rules say lui-meme.

We had a debate about if the person (in this example, Mark) got to pick the card or not. Or does it mean that Mark picks one of his cards without looking beforehand which one he loses.

The person who thought it was random was basing his argument on the fact that when a person loses a card because of a Skull in another person's pile, the person who owned the Skull picked a card randomly to be discarded.

Thanks in advance!
 
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Kirk Monsen
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I play that if it is your own skull it is not random.
 
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Fabien Conus
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MunchWolf wrote:
I play that if it is your own skull it is not random.


That is correct.
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Herve Marly
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Hello dear gamers,

Indeed, when the challenger returns its own skull from the cards he submitted to him, he loses his challenge. He must discard one of his cards. But he chose the card he must separate. It was not by chance or by asking another player to designate, but he rejects knowingly. He can either choose the skull, if this card is still in the hand, or pick a flower.

Why this rule?
Because good players, sometimes on a good timing, are deliberately losing a bet to be the first player to the next round. Even if it loses a card.
To help build this strategy and to reward the risk taken bet when filed a Skull ahead, then the rule gives the player the possibility of choosing the card to discard.

Deliberately take the risk of losing a playing card is a real strategic move.
Especially on a face to face with the last two players.
Skull like poker combines the random strategy and understanding the behavior of other players.

Cordially

Hervé Marly

(I hope my english is enough correct to be clear)
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Kirk Monsen
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hrm, I haven't thought of deliberately losing a bet. I've only flipped my own skull when I bluff, hoping to be outbid, and my bluff is called.
 
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Patricio Mendez
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I was playing this wrong the whole time. I thought you randomly remove one of your own cards. I went back and checked the SKULL rules and you are right; if it's your own skull you choose what to discard. Thanks!
 
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D.M. Jones
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MunchWolf wrote:
hrm, I haven't thought of deliberately losing a bet. I've only flipped my own skull when I bluff, hoping to be outbid, and my bluff is called.


Initiative can be quite powerful in this game.
 
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Kirk Monsen
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getdafunkout wrote:
MunchWolf wrote:
hrm, I haven't thought of deliberately losing a bet. I've only flipped my own skull when I bluff, hoping to be outbid, and my bluff is called.


Initiative can be quite powerful in this game.


I agree, initiative is very powerful, but also having cards is powerful in an exponential fashion.

If you knew all other player's skulls were gone, I could see making the sacrifice to then get the lead and win the game, but if there were still other skulls in play, getting initiative would not get you closer to winning the game.
 
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D.M. Jones
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It let's you open with the first option in the next round of play though, and that can be quite powerful. Being able to put in that first bid or lay down a second tile unexpectedly can be huge. And it can also be done in tandem with an overbidding play that is designed to prevent another player from converting an accurate bid. Losing a card is a sacrifice to be sure, but it can be worth it.
 
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Kirk Monsen
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I understand that, but having initiative for one round ... I just don't see it as being more powerful than having card options, which also equate to hit points that keep you in the game longer. The cost of the sacrifice is bigger than the gain.
 
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D.M. Jones
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Well, you can have all of your cards and still lose the game. So, while they are clearly important, there are other considerations. The object of the game isn't to keep your coasters. But of course, you know that. We just seem to disagree a bit on a fine point.

Cheers
 
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