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Subject: A World at War, learning the ropes. rss

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Anybody knows if there is one or several log files to learn this game?
Or maybe a 6+ hours video tutorial? shake
One of my friends bought this on the last GMT sale and I don't want it collecting dust on the shelf.
 
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John M
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Not really a tutorial but IMHO a must-read: A life-altering game deserves this kind of session report.
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HeavyGear wrote:
Not really a tutorial but IMHO a must-read: A life-altering game deserves this kind of session report.


Yes! I read it some time ago. Amazing AAR/life experience, but not a tutorial per se. Thank you anyways.
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Enrico Viglino
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Slowed - BGG's moderation policies have driven me partially from here
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I'd do it if GMT sent me a free copy. Otherwise, I've got my eyes out for a cheap(er) one.
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I bought this at last years P500 sale and it's been sitting on my shelf since. I really want to do it, but I have so many other games that I can sit down and learn in an afternoon or a few days, it's hard to get motivated to get this down knowing it will capitalize my time and energy at the expense of everything else. One day...
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Mike W
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I preordered the reprint from GMT. I have played the North Africa scenario, then got distracted by other games, so I only know the very basics of movement and air/ground combat.

That being said, here are some resources I have found useful:

Resource List
The AWAW web page:
http://aworldatwar.org/

AWAW yahoo group (where most AWAW players are, from what I can tell)
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/aworldatwar/info

Warplanner (AWAW online play):
http://www.warplanner.com/

Of course, check out the game page on BGG -- there are some recent session reports! You might want to post this there as well.
A World at War

Tutorials (ish)
The most basic play through I know of if for the North Africa scenario. It's actually attached to the yahoo group for AWAW, but until you get access, it may be hard to get a copy. So, I am copying it here with attribuition. There are no illustrations in the file, so it is what it is. See end of the post.

Also, I just now found what looks like a pretty decent sea / air walk through on the aworldatwar web site, looks decent, I will have to check it out:
http://aworldatwar.org/Files/Contributions/Game%20Reports/Co...


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A World At War for Dummies – by Simon Millar

As a Christmas present to myself I went and purchased the GMT wargame A World At War. It wasn't an impulsive moment; I am not rich enough to impulsively spend hundreds of dollars on a game. It was a very conscious decision based on many weeks of careful research. I was looking specifically for a WWII Grand Strategy Game and naturally I wanted to purchase the best game I could find. While I would love to go back to the days of my youth when I had the time to learn and play dozens of games now as an electrician and single father quickly approaching 40 I both limited time and resources. I am delighted to announce that AWAW has been worth both the money and the many hours I have already poured into it. While I am still at the beginning of a long road I can see that this game is going to provide me an my friends with hours and hours and hours of entertainment.

The article is the first in a series of pieces I plan to write aimed at saving fellow beginners the many hours I have spent trying to decypher the rule and asking dumb questions on the Yahoo AWAW Internet discussion forum. Before I begin I would like to thank all those fellow AWAW players who have politely answered even my silliest questions. The Yahoo forum is must. It is there that you can ask any question and always receive an answer within an hour or two. You can also follow the (to the beginner) arcane discussions of experienced AWAW gamers whose level of devotion to AWAW is a little scary and quasi religious.

I have had to learn AWAW the hard way, I live in Australia have only just managed to find a face to face opponent who is just as new to AWAW as myself. I think this puts me in the ideal position to write an AWAW for dummies, firstly because I'm no Einstein and I often need things spelt out in simple English several times and secondly because I am learning the game by simply reading the rules in front of me without the hands on guidance of an experienced player. I want to make learning this game less daunting principally to generate potential opponents and because a game of this caliber deserves an easy avenue to new players.

So you have just purchased AWAW, I love the excitement of opening a new game especially one so lovingly crafted as this one. You slide open the box to revealing four excellent maps, sheets containing thousands of beautiful counters, hundreds of pages of rules written in small type, player aids, supplementary material even an old SPI style counter tray. I love popping out counters and AWAW certainly provides hours of enjoyment in this regard but before doing so I would firstly read section 6 of the rules covering counters. Also I would highly recommend getting at least five large plastic subdivided containers the type used for storing fishing tackle or sewing gear. I would also by a cheap labeler, I wish I had done this as I now look many of the counters used to represent the minor countries or partisans and wonder if in future I will be able to work out by myself who they represent.

Before popping out the counters have a look, you will notice on many of the infantry and armor counters are acronyms. This has been done for historical flourish and what these acronyms stand for are nott explained in the rules. My knowledge of the specifics of WWII is still shall we say limited so I still have no idea what many of them stand for I am hoping that Bruce Harper or a fellow AWAW enthusiast will in the future be able to provide a complete list of what they stand for and where they were situated. As you will notice you have a raft of named ships so one of the delights of AWAW is be being able to recreate the hunt for the Bismarck while fighting Rommel's armies in North Africa. So while it up to individual to work out how to best subdivide all of AWAW multitude of counters I recommend a separate smaller counter tray to contain the mechanics counters which range from exploitation markers to counters marked with a countries flag used to show who controls a blank hex.

There are no specific rules for the use of the mechanics counters in terms of placement as it really will be terribly obvious from the rules when and where to use them. This didn't stop me asking though and I will come back to this later. I would also include the markers for Fortresses, Railheads, Bridge Heads and those nasty Atomic Bomb & Firestorm counters. In fact there are an awful lot of atomic bomb counters I haven't read the rules for atomic warfare yet but I wonder if it possible to both end the War and humanity at the same time. Also don't forget to put the two turn counter somewhere easy to find, one if for the year the second is for the season. Each season represents a game turn.Now if you don't have a labeler you could simply make up a key. I strongly recommend developing a system whereby it is easy to quickly identify a countries counters as the name of the countries are printed on the sheets rather than the counters though many of the acronyms do help to identify countries later on. Having enough trays to thouroughly subdivide the counters will save you a lot of time setting up.

Okay you have punched out all your counters flicked through all the material and looked at the maps. Before we proceed there are some other activities I recommend you carry on in conjunction with learning the rules. Firstly if you are like me and you knowledge of WWII is either rusty or very limited then I recommend getting yourself a good history of WWII. If you are not into reading then either rent or buy the brilliant series made in the seventies buy British television called 'A World at War'. For instance I had no idea what the special unit called a Chindit was ( it sounded like a chicken dish) I quickly found out from 'A World at War' that they were the specially trained jungle troops of the British fighting in Burma. AWAW has a lot of history interwoven into the rules, which you really can only discover; buy gaining a deeper understanding of the wars history. It one of the reasons I love wargames as they do facilitate a greater understanding of military history and in AWAW's case also the economic, diplomatic and political underpinnings of warfare.

Now if you don't have a computer hooked up to the Internet you are at a distinct disadvantage but these days’ libraries allow access plus countless Internet café's. Go to the AWAW home site easily found by navigating from the GMT website. Here I would immediately download and print off a number of articles. Firstly AWAW is supported by a regular magazine called ULTRA (ULTRA is the name of code breaking in the European Theatre). There are a free copies of ULTRA ready to download. These two issues of ULTRA have lengthy articles on strategy and tactics for both the Axis and the Allies. It gives you a future insight into the enormous depth and complexity of this game and they left me itching to play the full Global War Extravaganza. Also is a section labeled archives I would immediately download the article called 'Now & Then' as well as the article on attrition. I would read 'Now & Then, even before reading the rules. It gives you a great overview of how AWAW evolved from its originator 'Third Reich', designed by Bruce Harper and published by Avalon Hill way back in the 70',s passing through years of play testing to final spawn AWAW.

Okay you have got the rules in front of you all 89 sections with many many subsections, how do you proceed to learn this monster of a game? Well unless you are a near genius with an encyclopedic memory I suggest you will have little to no chance of being able to jump right into the Global War game or even the European or Pacific campaigns. AWAW is playable at a number of levels, you can play scenarios, which are both a the way to learn and even to come back and play if you want a short game of AWAW. For instance I downloaded a terrific scenario based on the Spanish Civil War. From the small scale scenario's AWAW then progresses to larger scale scenarios like Barbarossa all the way through individual theatre campaigns to the penultimate Global War game. An added beauty of AWAW is that as an entrance to the campaign game you can play the Historical versions which set the parameters according to real Historical events thus greatly simplifying play before you take a crack at re writing History. The way to begin learning AWAW is to play the Nth Africa scenario solo. I would recommend playing it face to face though many prefer to leave the face to face playing for the Barbarossa scenerio. This article should guide you through everthing you need to know to play the Nth Africa Scenerio.

Okay now its time to really begin. Grab the booklet titled Research & Diplomacy Tables and go to the fourth page from the back where you will find Bruce Harpers Designer Notes, now read. You will also need your Rulebook at hand ready to read the sections I indicate.

Then set up the European Map, lovely isn't it, turn to the last few pages of the Research & Diplomacy Tables and you will find the Terrain Effect Chart. It's time to look at the map and identify its key features in conjunction with reading section four of the Rulebook. (from here on when I refer to a section I am referring to the Rulebook). It is important to be able to recognize the red objective hexes as they play a key role in redeployment and often victory conditions. You will immediately come across acronyms, which are explained in section three . For instance the acronym ZoC refers to the Zones of Control exercised by armor units that extend to their six surrounding hexes. You don't need to fully understand what you are reading on the terrain effect chart this is just an exercise in being able to recognize many of the most basic features on the map such as Cities, Ports fortresses, fortifications and the different terrain such as jungles and mountains. Wargames are great for geography too. On the bottom left hand corner you will also see the boxes surrounded by years and seasons(the turn chart), in the smaller scenario's like the Nth Africa Scenario you can use these boxes to place you re-enforcements (called allowable builds). You should also notice on the edge of the map what are called Mapboard Boxes. These Mapboard Boxes represent those areas off the board, units can be moved into and out of them and in some cases supplied from them. There are also the Strategic Warfare (SW) Boxes we can ignore them for now.

In the Nth Africa scenario you will be using the India and the South Africa Mapboard Boxes and then only in a very simple manner..Nevertheless read the introduction to section five and the rules 5.3 and 5.4. Much of what is written you will only partially understand and will have to re read later but be thorough and learn all the acronyms. All you need to pick up is a very general picture of what role these boxes play in AWAW plus to get a rough picture of what hexes you would have to travel through to reach these boxes. Don't fret about it not making sense yet in the Nth Africa Scenario units simply appear once ready for deployment in the India and South Africa boxes and are then redeployed to a choice of cities. The scenario outline tells you how this is done and I will go into more detail later.

Now I have always found the easiest way to learn a game is to get the counters set up on the board and proceed through the sequence of play. I must admit that even getting to this stage in AWAW caused me quite a bit of grief so hopefully you can follow my instructions and be on your way without the problems I encountered. Before you start pulling out counters you need to read section 7 of the rules book and the first page of the Scenario Booklet. In section 7 ignore rules 7.221 and 7.222 and 7.33. You can read them if you like but they have no bearing on this scenario. BRP growth rates, Diplomacy points, Research points are all music for the future. It will important to note the paragraph in the Scenario Booklet introduction, which gives you the abbreviations for the specialized units. In particular you need to know that 1m3 stands for the airborne units. The counters themselves have little wings over the infantry symbol and they are marked with a 1-3. The first number is the combat factor the second is the movement factor.

Okay let proceed to finding the Nth Africa Force Pool Table it is located in the Record Sheet Booklet. Go through the Record Sheet Booklet until you find the page labeled North Africa Scenario so far so good. You will also need to flick through the Scenario Booklet until you find the North Africa scenario. Notice that next to the Nth Africa scenario outline is an abbreviated turn sequence you will be using this.

By reading section 7 you should now be able to comprehend the Nth Africa Force Pool Table but just in case here's how to do it. Along the top of the chart is the name of each country below that are columns, which represent the various air, armor and specialized forces (in this scenario only airborne units). The down the side of the table you have 'At Start' followed by Sp41, Su41, Fa41…Wi42 which are the seasons Spring 1941 through to Winter 1942 which is the end of the scenario unless one side concedes beforehand. Now go to the 'At Start' row the first number in brackets you will come to is [2] under the heading of Germany and directly below AAF. This number reprents two German Army Air Factors (AAF) which are on the mapboard at the start of the game. Army Air units are represented by the counter with the infinity symbol. The first number on an Army Air counter is the Army Air factor; the second number is the range. Looking at the German AAF counters you will find Army Air Units with AAF's ranging from 1 to 5. This confused my poor brain in the beginning. When a Force Pool chart indicates that you can place 2 AAF's 'At Start' it simply means you can either represent the Army Air units with one counter with an AAF value of 2 or use two counters with an AAF of 1(the counters will be either one 2-4 or two 1-4's). Army Air units can be broken down and combined at the players discretion, in fact rule 17.9 has three paragraph's on this matter just waiting for you to read To keep matters simple I would just take out the 2-4 Army Air Counter for Germany. Britain and Italy start with 3 AAF so you can either use a 3-4 counter, a 1-4 + 2-4 or three 1-4 counters.

Now proceeding along the row you come to the next units available at the start which is one German 2-6 armor unit. The columns don't specify if the units are armor or infantry this is only confusing when you first approach the game but you will in future easily recognize the difference as infantry units movement factor is three and armor units have movement factors ranging from 5 to 6. Looking across the rows you will see Italy has one 2-5 armor and Britain has two 2-5 armor units. Thats it for armor units at the start.

Infantry units are straightforward but there is another type of unit which first appears in Summer 1941. It is the South African 3-4 mechanized infantry unit. It doesn’t have its own picture in the rulebook so it can come as a bit of surprise. It is represented by the infantry symbol (the rectangle with the cross through it) with two little black dots, which appropriately look like wheels. Finally remember that 1m3 is an airborne unit.

As you go down the seasons you will see a number outside the brackets, that is the number of that particular unit that is available (e.g. in spring 41 Germany can bring in one 2-6 armor unit) in that season or the number of additional AAF's. The number inside the bracket is simply the running total you will never have more than that total of a particular unit on the board.

Okay now that you understand the Force PoolTable it is time to fetch the counters. Get all of the counters; place the ones that come in after the game begins in the boxes on the mapboard according to the year and season indicated by the Force Pool Table. Do not fret as I did about the acronyms on the counters of the minor countries, the colour and value of the counter is the important thing. For instance the two of the South African counters have WAf on them, they are the correct counters and have the same colour as the counter labeled SAf. The Australian counters represent ANZAC troops, one has Aus on it the other has NZ representing New Zealand Troops. As well as the start up counters you will need an Airbase counter for Germany, Italy and Britain. You will also need a Fortress marker for Tobruk. You have probably already done so but here is where you look up the Rulebook((use the index) to find out what these counter look like.

It is very important in AWAW to read the fine print so look at the writing at the bottom of the Force Pool Table. Units such as the Australian's are going to be withdrawn in the Fa41 (I forgot to do this), Indian units have their own unique way of entering the game (SR stands for strategic redeployment don't worry about this now) and the 4-5 armor unit is built in Alexandria. Below the Force Pool Table are the Victory conditions and a table for calculating them. I would either photocopy this or draw up your own version. I will talk about the Victory Conditions later.

Okay you should have your European Map set up, your reinforcements (they are call allowable builds) placed in the turn boxes corresponding to the year and season they are available. I say available and the rules say available because circumstances may prevent you being able to deploy these units onto the board also you may choose to deploy the available units later on.

Next to the map should be the counters that will be placed on the mapboard at the start of the game. Now you can either read through the entire Nth Africa Scenario guidelines or just read the Introduction down to an including section on Airbases then stop.

For those used to games with starts ups that tell you exactly where each counter goes AWAW is very different, especially later on. Germany controls Sicily and Libya West of MM19 and NN19. The Axis can basically set up anywhere in this region but this article has been written on the basis that you currently know nothing and are setting this scenario up for the first time solo so as to learn the mechanics of the game. So while the rules say set up the Germans First set up the British first as the placement of their ground forces is fixed at the start. For the British you simply need to make a decision about where to put your AAF's (remember the 3AAF could be represented by one 3-4 counter up to three 1-4 counter's, I would keep it simple and use one 3-4 counter) I would place the British AAF's within four hexes (their movement factor) of the British Units in MM20 and NN20 so as to be able to assist these ground forces.

You haven't had to think about stacking limits yet but now that you are about to place the Axis units you need to know the basics so you can set up. You can have no more than two ground units (this term refers to all the units which fight on the ground) in a hex plus any number of specialized ground units. AAF's must set up in either a city, city port or airbase each of which can stack 5 AAF's. You can place the Airbases on cities thus enabling you to place 10AAF's on that hex . This is in addition to any ground forces which may be in that hex.

While you can place the Axis units anywhere in the Axis controlled area the Victory Conditions force the Axis to at the very least try and take Bengazi or Tobruk. Don't worry about understanding the Victory Conditions yet except to know that victory points are gained for eliminating enemy units and for controlling their cities. Just place the Axis ground units and AAF plus airbases within four hexes of the British ground units in MM20 and NN20. You could start adjacent but for the purpose of learning the game I would set up a couple of hexes away. Remember to place the Fortress marker on Tobruk.

Now its time to start reading the necessary rules. So read on flipping between this article and the Rulebook and I will guide you through all the rules you need to digest to play the Nth Africa Scenerio. Having the mapboard and counters set up should help enormously in visualizing the game allowing you to put into practice what you have just read.

Read the Preface sections 1 and 2. Skip section 3 on 'Definitions'. You will constantly need to refer to this section until the acronyms become lodged in your brain.

Onto section four, you may wish to set up the pacific mapboard and give yourself a general overview of the AWAW playing surface. If you are in a rush you could skip the section on islands 4.7. Again take note of what are call objective hexes (labeled in red) these hexes play an important role in AWAW firstly as points to which units can be deployed to and from.

Section 5 read the introduction to Mapboard Boxes then read the sections on the India and the South African Mapboard Boxes. You will not understand much of it and it is not necessary to as most of it is does not come into play in this scenario. Essentially all that happens in this scenario is that units which the British either draws from the Force Pool (Those units you put in the turn boxes) or eliminated units the British rebuild get put in either in the South African or Indian Mapboard Box during the unit construction phase and then deployed onto the mapboard during the redeployment phase. The North Africa Scenario guide tells you how many units each side can deploy each turn and which British units get placed in which box and where they can be deployed too. I will explain this in more detail later.

Read Section 8 and then peruse the abbreviated sequence of play, you should also look at the full-blown version (its one of the player aids) just to get an idea of the future depth of this game.

Okay now you come to section 9, which is an overview of offensive operations. When I first read this section I just thought what the hell was that all about. It really doesn’t start to make sense until you come back to it in retrospect. So I would avoid its brain numbing effect (maybe its just me) by just picking out the eyes of this chapter.

Read 9.1 and 9.2. When the rules talk about uninverted air and naval units they are referring to the fact that air counters and naval counter are turned over once they have carried out an offensive operation basically as a way of stopping players accidentally using them twice (easy to do in the future when your dealing with hundreds of counter on multiple fronts). These units are flipped back over 'uninverted' when they are able to be used again'.

Read section 9.subsection 9.51 BRP(Basic Resource Point). cost of offensive operations. This is important because it is part of calculating the Victory points in the Nth Africa scenario. It is simple really each ground factor and AAF factor used in an attack on your enemy cost one BRP

E.g. you attack the British with your 2-6 armor 2-5 armor a 2-3 infantry and a 1-3 infantry plus 5AAF's this is a total of 7 ground factors (each combat factor represent a ground factor) plus 5 AAF's for a total cost in BRP's of 12.

Now go to the Victory Conditions Chart (this chart is located under the Force Pool Chart). It spells out that for every 5 BRP's spent on offensive operations (round up) you loose one victory point (VP). So in this instance the Axis would loose 3VP and in fact it could employ as many extra units as it had available and incur no further VP loss as you the victory condition state you can only loose a maximum of 3VP. The other reason you need to total your BRP expenditureduring offensives is to see whether you can use 'Attrition'. Obviously you have no idea about Attrition yet but the rule is simple if you spend over 14 BRP's on offensive operations on a single front (The Nth Africa Scenario is a single front) then you cannot use Attrition. Attrition is either rarely or not used at all in the Nth Africa Scenario but it can be used so you will need to learn the rules. I digress.

Ignore subsections 9.52 to 9.56 read 9.57 plus 9.58. Read all of 9.6 you will only partially understand the rules here but it is important and you will need to re read this subsection again later. Section 9 is an overview and many of the rules are repeated later as necessary. Ignore 9.7 it will only confuse you now. Read 9.8

Read section 10 obviously it is only necessary to read up on the units being employed in this scenario. In the Nth Africa scenario you do not have any Air Transport units so the Airborne units (1m3) cannot airdrop. Thus they are effectively just infantry but because they are specialized units they can stack on top of two ground units.

Skip section 11 read all of section 12. Read all of section 13 but don’t worry about the naval stuff or weather effects it is always considered clear weather on this part of the mapboard. Overruns like Attrition will most likely not happen in a real game but still I'd advise using the counters for this scenario to simulate an overrun. Until you grasp the basic combat rules plus the air rules you wont understand how overruns are played out for now the key thing to remember is you need 6-1 odds to conduct an overrun. You will read about caculating combat odds soon.

The next section is on Attrition. Now I would skip this section for now. It took me a while, the downloading of an ULTRA archives article on Attrition and playing the Barbarossa scenario to get a basic handle on attrition. Attrition reflects the sort of combat that was the order of the day in WWI lines of infantry facing each other from entrenched positions. It is quite simple once you understand the rules but I would master the basic combat rules first then come back and learn attrition.

You need to read and understand all of section 15 offensive combat. Here is where you use the counters you have set up to play through the mechanics of executing ground attacks. Move those Axis counters role some dice see what combinations of attacks you can use to break through the British units. It was here I had the Ex result on the combat table spelt out. If after you take into account the defenders DM(defence multiplier) both sides have an equal number of combat factors then both sides are completely eliminated.

Then move onto learning section 16 a vital chapter on Exploitation. Again play with counters you have don't be afraid to add countesr and set up exploitation attacks with three or more tank plus infantry. Here you have mechanic counters you need to place. You have Breakthrough counters, which are placed on the breakthrough hex, and then you have exploitation counters that you place on the exploiting armor units. Exploitation is the heart of the Blitzkrieg, the Germans invented it the Russian reinvented it.

Now read Section 17 this covers air units obviously you only need to read the overview and the section on Army Air units and 17.9 on 'Partial Air Counters'.

Section 18 Air Operations another vital section which you need to fully understand Simply ignore or skim over the subsections that deal with Naval Air Squadrons, Carrier Based Air and Air Transports. Read this section followed by section 19 and then it's time to put the air rules into practice. Go to section 18.511. In the Nth Africa Scenario you with be able to possibly carry at missions A, E, F, and G during the movement phase. Set up an overrun, provide ground support, run through intercepting this ground support (mission F) and counter intercepting interceptors (mission G). Carry out counter air of an enemy air base. Play through these missions until they are clear in you mind and the results of dice rolls make sense. During the combat phase of the Nth Africa scenario you will be able to carry out missions A, D, F and H. Once again play through each mission and then learn how to combine air and ground units.

Remember the 3 AAF to 1 ground factor limit especially if you are the attacker. Read rule 18.555. This rule is may seem ahistorical but it stops the attacker being able to carry out numerous unrealistic feints by drawing the defender into providing defensive air support for an attack that doesn’t occur. This may still be a good tactic at time but the attacker must pay a cost in eliminated air units. You will need to read this section several times and in conjunction with section 15. These are that 10% of the rules that get used 90% of the time.

Once you feel you understand basic air and ground combat go back and learnt Attrition

Read the very beginning of section 27 subsection 27.11. This outlines the BRP costs of building the various units in AWAW. You don't use the construction rules in the Nth Africa Scenario but you do calculate Victory Points buy totally up the BRP construction value of units destroyed.

E.g. you will earn 3 Victory Points for eliminating an Airbourne unit (1m3), 4 VP's for eliminated a German 2-6 armor unit, 2 VP's for eliminating a 2-3 infantry unit.

In the Nth Africa scenario their isn't a paragraph that tells you how many units each side can construct. Rather it tells you have many units you can deploy each turn. This number is effectively the number of units each side can construct at no BRP cost. You will have a choice of rebuilding units that have been eliminated, or building units that are available on the Force Pool Chart.

Now you need to read section 28 on ''Redeployment. Once again you can either skip or skim over the sections, which deal with Naval Redeployment. Redeployment in the Nth Africa scenario is pretty simple, re read the section of the Nth Africa scenario guide that tells you how you can redeploy. Just remember that during Strategic Redeployment you can only deploy between and from the red objective hexes. Also in AWAW the ship transports have been abstracted they are not represented by counters.

Now onto section 29 'Hex Control'. Here you only need to read subsections 29.1 through to 29.3. It is important to understand when a hex comes under your control especially for tracing supply. AWAW includes counters with the major and minor countries flags on them. These are used to indicate the control of clear hexes especially around combat zones, you will need to use them as it is easy to forget who has last past through particular unnamed hexes.

You now need to read section 30 on'Supply'. I would read the whole thing you wont understand it all but it is a vital part of the game and the you will be re reading it many times in the future. Don't worry about references to things that you will not yet encounter like all the sea supply stuff and Russian IC's (Industrial Centers). I would read the supply rules for the Nth Africa scenario after reading this section and get a clear picture of where the British and the Axis trace their supply.

There is an important difference in AWAW to many games in regards to how an armor unit exerts its Zone of Control. In many games which use a smaller scale if a unit in an enemies Zone of Control it negates the effect of that ZoC. In AWAW this is not so, this reflects the huge area represented by each hex as well as the huge number of armor or infantry each ground factor represents. So if the Axis can get behind the British in East Libya with that narrow gap they can potentially devastate many British units by cutting their supply lines.

Okay we are on the home stretch all you need to read now is section 31 on 'Bridge Heads' (it's unlikely they will come into play) and finally section 32 on 'Fortifications'.

That's it !!! They are all the rules you need to comprehend for this scenario and the bulk of the rules for next scenario need to play and learn 'Barbarossa'.

Now read the entire Nth Africa Scenario quide from start to finish. The Axis can basically bring back 4 ground factors each turn. The term ground factor refers to the combat factor of either an armor unit or infantry or specialized unit (1m3), so one ground factor equals one combat factor.

E.g. say the Axis player had lost his 2-6 armor unit and one 1-3 infantry unit and it is Summer 1941 you could bring back all those units plus the 1-3 German infantry unit available to be built.

The units to be deplloyed are placed in Messina and then redeployed to Tripoli or Tobruk if the Axis controls Tobruk. This is an abstract and simplified form of Naval Redeployment. Now if the Axis has three units it can deploy from Messina and they don't control Tobruk they can only bring them to Tripoli but you cannot exceed the stacking limit so you will have to choose 2 of the three units. Looking at the previous example you would obviously choose bring back the 2-6 armor unit but if you had a choice between a German 1-3 infantry unit or Italian 1-3 infantry unit you would bring back the German because it has a Combat Training Level (CTL) of 2 to the Italians 1. The British have a CTL of 1.

The scenario brief doesn’t mention the deploment of Axis Air Factors this is because the Italian AAF that comes into play in Fall 41 can Tactically Redeploy from Messina by flying its staging distance eight hexes to any Airbase (city or airbase counter) within range. Once these Axis ground units have reached either Tripoli or possibly Tobruk or in the case of an air unit an airbase they can then possibly Strategically Redeploy if the Axis have taken a British objective hex (say Suez) or they can all Tactically Redeploy.

The number of British units that can either be brought back or constructed from the Force Pool is limited by the number of Indian Transports (remember these transports are abstract there are no counters for them). These transports decrease from 4 to 2 in 1942.

E.g. the four Indian transports could bring 1 armor unit (regardless of its combat factor) plus 6 combat factors worth of infantry and 5 AAF.

The units when first constructed are placed in either the Indian or South African Box according to their nationality during the unit contruction phase. This is outlined in the Nth Africa scenario guide under unit construction. They can then be Redeployed to either Suez or Basra or both during the redoployment phase. Again you will be limited by the stacking limits. 2 ground factors and five AAF in a city plus any number of specialized units.

Now go to back to the Force Pool Table and take note of how the Indian units are Strategically Redeployed (between hexes NN27 – NN30 inclusive). Also once again take note of the fact that the ANZAC troops are pulled out in the redeployment phase of Fall 1941.

When rolling for the Axis supply status roll during the initial supply determination phase. That's 5I on the abbreviated Sequence of Play.

Now the Victory conditions are outlined as I have mentioned below the Force Pool Table. They should be fairly straight forward I only found the last section dealing with gaining victory points for the control of cities unclear.Every turn the Axis gains one VP if they control Tobruk and two VP for every city in Egypt. Every turn the British gain one VP for Tobruk and Bengazi and two VP for Buerat and Tripoli. So this means the British who control Tobruk at the beginning will start straight away receiving one Victory Point at the end of each turn unless the Axis take control of Tobruk. This compels the Axis to repeat history and go on an offensive otherwise Britain can sit back, reinforce itself and win the game. From my very limited experience the Axis need both luck and bad play by the British to win,. They have a narrow window of opportunity before the British re enforcements are overwhelming, but remember the ability of the British to get their re enforcements onto the board drops by half in 1942. This I reflects the fact that the British had diverted there forces to what turned out to be a disastrous defeat in Greece.

I hope that this article has made beginning to learn AWAW a lot easier than it was for me. I am still in the process of playing through the next scenario you need to master, Barbarossa. Once I feel I have clarified all the rules in regards to the Barbarossa scenario I will produce the second installment of AWAW for dummies. My intention is to continue this series of AWAW for dummies articles right up to the Global War Campaign Game so stayed tuned. If you have read this piece and by some miracle live in Melbourne Australia then look me up on AWAW player directory and e-mail me. I am always happy to play and hopefully crush underfoot less experienced players than myself.


Simon Millar

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Gary Goh
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I have a AWAW startup guide which was written by a guy named Roger Kruger. The author has given his permission for his writeup to be uploaded onto BGG as a resource, so it's now with the mods for approval.

The writeup provides some useful information on how to begin play of the game -- this includes simple pointers on setup and an "annotated Sequence of Play" (to quote a line) which highlights some of the essentials to remember in each step, and contains references to the relevant rules.

Hopefully, this will help somewhat.

Edit: Just found out that the submission has been approved (that was fast!). Here is the link:

A World at War -- Startup Guide

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