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Subject: Colour blind test rss

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Dan
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Hello all,

I currently have a science fiction game in development and am keen to try and make the game as colourblind friendly as possible. Each player will have disks representing their fleets which will need to be made in 5 colours while there are 4 resource types that will be represented with cubes.

The factory has provided me a colour chart and I have made some provisional decisions but I would love to hear from all the BGG users out there who suffer from colourblindness to let me know how easy it is for you to differentiate them.



The 4 cubes colours could be:

Red #42
Blue #50
Yellow #30
Green #62

and the disks could be

Black
White
Golden Yellow #32
Pink #46
Lilac #47

Any advise you could give would be fantastic!
 
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いい竹やぶだ!

South Euclid
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SpiralDan wrote:



Sorry, I can't see your image, postimg.org/image/54h1sx1ex/. Perhaps it's a file within that directory?
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Kendall McKenzie
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if you whip up an image file with pictures of all these coloured components, you can upload it to a website like this that lets you choose a type of colour blindness and simulates what a person with that type might see - of course it's not going to be perfect as everyone is different, but it is a good starting point
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Paul Bryant
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http://postimg.org/image/54h1sx1ex/

Dan was looking at that website trying to judge but none of us is color-blind so we thought we'd ask a little external advice.

 
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Jeff Bryer
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Burnaby
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There are also apps available for smart phones (I have Color Blind Vision for iOS) that use the camera and then display the image as the different types of colour blindness.
 
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Herb
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see:
http://www.popphoto.com/news/2013/02/colour-blindness-simula...

You have to download photo then upload to this site. But then you can spin through different kinds of colorblindness.

http://www.color-blindness.com/coblis-color-blindness-simula...
 
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James
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I am color blind, and would love to help you, but I can't see the image.

Perhaps try posting on a more common image hosting site, such as imgur.com?
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Andrew Rowse
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Even for normally sighted people, I think you're trying to use too many colours. Yellow and gold are too close to be distinguishable.

If I were you, I would limit to five colours - black, white, blue, yellow and either red or green. These should be easy for most colourblind people to differentiate.
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James
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KAndrw wrote:
Even for normally sighted people, I think you're trying to use too many colours. Yellow and gold are too close to be distinguishable.

If I were you, I would limit to five colours - black, white, blue, yellow and either red or green. These should be easy for most colourblind people to differentiate.


I also really like the Power Grid approach for resources - make them different shapes/sizes AND different colors. Much easier to differentiate.
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Herb
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eviljelloman wrote:
KAndrw wrote:
Even for normally sighted people, I think you're trying to use too many colours. Yellow and gold are too close to be distinguishable.

If I were you, I would limit to five colours - black, white, blue, yellow and either red or green. These should be easy for most colourblind people to differentiate.


I also really like the Power Grid approach for resources - make them different shapes/sizes AND different colors. Much easier to differentiate.


I'd agree with the suggestion, but I'd state the reasoning differently. Given two different shapes, if they were were the same color, then I'd expect the color itself to have some significance in the game.

In other words, there would be some sort of "white" relationship between white cubes and white discs.

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Michael Oliver
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If colorblindness is a concern, why not use one of the browns or naturals, instead of green and second yellow?

It is funny that many games use red, green, blue, and yellow, the two most common colorblind pairings, as the main game tokens. However, when I opened Kingdom Builder, it was blue, orange, natural, and black. No issue with colorblindness there, at all.
 
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dennis bennett
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using color oracle on my mac:


My best guess is usually to choose orange/red vs. green tones that are as different as possible in lightness/saturation, with green usually being lighter than red.
Sadly, the manufacturer seems to have chosen orange/red and light green/dark green shades that will look almost identical to deuteranopes. too bad.
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dennis bennett
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eviljelloman wrote:
KAndrw wrote:
Even for normally sighted people, I think you're trying to use too many colours. Yellow and gold are too close to be distinguishable.

If I were you, I would limit to five colours - black, white, blue, yellow and either red or green. These should be easy for most colourblind people to differentiate.


I also really like the Power Grid approach for resources - make them different shapes/sizes AND different colors. Much easier to differentiate.


good advice.
I might add a "neutral grey" to the list of fairly unproblematic colours, so white, grey, black, yellow, blue and either red OR green.

Try to avoid dark blues and purple at all cost as they can often not be distinguished from black (especially under poor lighting) avoid pairings of
red and equally saturated/bright green
dark green and blue
dark orange and red

edit: i also started this thread a while back that might be helpful:
http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/1120253/dice-for-the-color-b...
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Paolo G
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In general, you can form a good colour-blind-friendly palette using a true red (not orange), a yellow, a cold green (towards aquamarine), a blue, and optionally black and white. The more colours you try to add, the more sophisticated your choice algorithm must be to minimise the risk that colours will not be (easily) distinguished; by the way, this also applies to non-colour-blind people in poor lighting or under strain, or when their eyesight starts to worsen with age.

Using shapes and other cues to supplement colour is the only sure way to go, provided these cues are clearly distinguishable themselves.

That said, manufacturers of coloured items should know that it makes little sense to ask for a choice of colours based on an image of the goods, especially a digital image: colour reproduction by a monitor or printer is never faithful, which for some colours may mean a very noticeable difference. I expect a good manufacturer would suggest a palette based on colorimetric measurements made in house on the finished items, but apparently it's not the case.



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Meaker VI
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Green #61 looks less problematic than #62. #65 also looks ok, but might get mixed up with the blue. #30 and #32 are basically the same, I imagine they'd be hard for non-colorblind people since I'm R-G colorblind. Swap that one for #12 or #13.

Without them in front of me, #46 and #47 look fine. I find problems more often when the blocks are next to each-other on the board, not spread around a neutral background with (probably) ideal lighting.
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MURRUMBEENA
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I have moderate/strong protanopia. Your first choice should always be black and white. As more colours are required, add dark blue, yellow, red and pink - in that order. Green creates problems for red/green and blue/green colourblindness. This is exacerbated by fluorescent lights, which emit green-tinged light.

Your second step should be to use alternate shapes: cubes, triangles, hexagons and rods* are all easily obtained.



*like the "wood" pieces in Stone Age
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