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Subject: Collectibles for Republicans rss

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Josh
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The greatest Republican presidents of the 20th Century have been commemorated in coin form:

Harding

Coolidge

Hoover


Their defense of Republican values will not be forgotten.
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Bat Profile
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JoshBot wrote:


Their defense of Republican values will not be forgotten.


Neener.
 
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jeremy cobert
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JoshBot wrote:
The greatest Republican presidents of the 20th Century have been commemorated in coin form:


I love the Silent Cal , nice find.

My wifes grandfather gave us a couple dozen Frankoma GOP mugs. They are collectable but not worth much . http://www.frankomapottery.com/GOP2012.html I would avoid the Democrat mugs, they break easily and dont work very well.
 
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Chief Slovenly
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YOU FORGOT SAINT REAGAN

FAPFAPFAPFAPFAPFAPFAP
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Chris R.
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JoshBot wrote:

Harding


Some people think that Harding was the worst president, or one of the worse.

However, I do like this recent story:

"...the VA's history: It came about because the agency's first leader was an audacious crook. ... He sold off federal supplies. He wildly misspent taxpayer money -- once buying a 100-year supply of floor wax, enough to polish a floor the size of Indiana, for 25 times the regular price (apparently as a favor to a floor wax company). Eventually, Forbes was caught. The president was unhappy. In 1923, a White House visitor opened the wrong door and found Harding choking Forbes with his bare hands. 'You yellow rat! You double-crossing bastard!' ... Seventy years after Forbes was gone, the place was still wrapped in that red tape."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/national/2014/05/30/how-the...

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James King
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JoshBot wrote:
The greatest Republican presidents of the 20th Century have been commemorated in coin form:

Harding

Ah, yes, the "great" Warren Harding.

> Excerpts from the Wikipedia entry about the administration of President Warren G. Harding:

The administration of Warren G. Harding followed the Republican national platform. Energized by his landslide, Harding felt the "pulse" of the nation and for the 28 months in office he remained popular both nationally and internationally. Harding's administration has been critically viewed due to multiple scandals, while his successes in office were often given credit to his capable cabinet appointments that included future President Herbert Hoover.

Author Wayne Lutton asked, "Was Harding really a failure?," citing former Watergate persona John Dean, who grew up near Harding's home, as saying Harding's accomplishments included income tax and federal spending reductions, economic policies that reduced "stagflation", a reduction of unemployment by 10%, and a bold foreign policy that created peace with Germany, Japan, and Central America, though Dean's work itself only cites a "slight decline in unemployment figures" and does not mention "stagflation" at all. Herbert Hoover, while serving in Harding's cabinet, was confident the President would serve two terms and return the world to normalcy. Later, in his own memoirs, he stated that Harding had "neither the experience nor the intellect that the position needed."

The most notorious scandal was the Teapot Dome affair, most of which came to light long after Harding's death. This affair concerned an oil reserve in Wyoming that was covered by a teapot-shaped rock formation. For years, the country had taken measures to ensure the availability of petroleum reserves, particularly for the Navy's use. On February 23, 1923, Harding issued Executive Order #3797, which created the Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 4 in Alaska. By the 1920s, it was clear that petroleum was important to the national economy and security. The reserve system was to keep the oil under government jurisdiction rather than subject to private claims.[169] Management of these reserves was the subject of multi-dimensional arguments—beginning with a turf battle between the Secretary of the Navy and the Interior Dept. The strategic reserves issue was also a debate topic between conservationists and the petroleum industry, as well as those who favored public ownership versus private control. Harding's Secretary of the Interior, Albert B. Fall, brought to that office significant political and legal experience, in addition to heavy personal debt, incurred in his obsession to expand his personal estate, Three Rivers, in New Mexico. He also was an avid supporter of the private ownership and management of reserves.

Fall contracted Edward Doheny of Pan American Corp. to build storage tanks in exchange for drilling rights. It later came to light that Doheny had made significant personal loans to Fall.The Secretary also negotiated leases for the Teapot Dome reserves to Harry Sinclair of the Consolidated Oil Corp. in return for guaranteed oil reserves to the credit of the government. Again, it later emerged that Sinclair had personally made concurrent cash payments of over $400,000 to Fall. These activities took place under the unsuspecting watch of progressive and conservationist attorney, Harry Slattery, acting for Gifford Pinchot and Robert La Follete. Fall was ultimately convicted in 1931 of accepting bribes and illegal no-interest personal loans in exchange for the leasing of public oil fields to business associates. In 1931, Fall was the first cabinet member in history imprisoned for crimes committed while in office. Paradoxically, while Fall was convicted for taking the bribe, Doheny was acquitted of paying it.

n a 1998 Washington Post article, journalist Carl S. Anthony wrote that Harding had extramarital affairs with four women. These women included Susie Hodder and Carrie Fulton Phillips, Mrs. Harding's personal friends; Grace Cross, Harding's senatorial aide; and Nan Britton. Anthony stated that Harding was the father of Hodder's daughter. In her 1927 book, "The President's Daughter", Britton said that Harding fathered her daughter, Elizabeth Ann, as well, during a 1919 tryst in his senatorial offices. Britton, who had a profound obsession with Harding beginning in high school, also said that she was his mistress before and during his administration. Historian Henry F. Graff states that Harding was sterile and that Harding's affair with Britton ended after Harding assumed the presidency.

Historian Francis Russell wrote that, beginning in the spring of 1905, Harding had a 15-year relationship with Carrie Fulton Phillips, wife of businessman and friend James Eaton Phillips of Marion, Ohio. More than 100 intimate letters between Harding and Mrs. Philips were discovered in the 1960s, but publication of the letters was enjoined by court order in Ohio until 2024. Russell, however, viewed the letters upon their discovery and described them as very touching and naive in some respects, erotic in others. Russell also concluded from the letters that Phillips was the love of Harding's life —— "the enticements of his mind and body combined in one person".

Harding traditionally has been ranked as one of the worst presidents. In a 1948 poll conducted by Harvard University historian Arthur M. Schlesinger, Sr., the first notable survey of scholars' opinions of the presidents, Harding ranked last among the 29 presidents considered. In a 1962 poll conducted by Schlesinger, he was ranked last again, 31 out of 31. His son, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., conducted another poll in 1996; once again, Harding was last, ranked 39 out of 39. In 2010, a Siena College Research Institute survey of 238 presidential scholars ranked Harding 41st among the 43 men who had been president, between Franklin Pierce (40th) and James Buchanan (42nd); Andrew Johnson was adjudged the worst.

Harding was also considered the third worst president in a 2002 Siena poll. Siena polls of 1982, 1990 and 1992 ranked him last.
However, Harding's biographer John W. Dean in 2004 believed that Harding was underrated. Authors Marcus Raskin and Robert Spero, in 2007, also believed that Harding was underrated, and admired Harding's quest for world peace after World War I and his successful naval disarmament among strongly armed nations, including France, Britain, and Japan. In his 2010 book, "The Leaders We Deserved (and a Few We Didn't): Rethinking the Presidential Rating Game", presidential historian Alvin S. Felzenberg, ranking presidents on several different criteria, ranked Harding 26th out of 40 presidents considered.




JoshBot wrote:
Coolidge

Ah, yes, the "great" Calvin Coolidge.

> Excerpts from the Wikipedia entry about the administration of President

The legacy of Calvin Coolidge is mixed. People who support more federal government involvement in the economy -- such as acting in advance to curb if not prevent stock-market crashes -- do not like him. People who support less federal government involvement in the economy like him.

Coolidge was president during a prosperous economy and the country did not face many challenges. He believed that the federal government should be as small as possible. He supported tax cuts and wanted the federal government to keep its hands off the economy.

Coolidge was criticized for refusing to give subsidies to farmers and when a giant flood happened in Mississippi and Louisiana during 1927, he did not want the federal government to be involved. This was part of his belief of Federalism, that the country's problems should be solved mainly by state governments and local governments rather than the federal government.



JoshBot wrote:
Hoover

Ah, yes, the "great" Calvin Coolidge.

> Excerpts from the Wikipedia entry about the administration of President Herbert Hoover:

Despite Hoover's hands-off ("laissez-faire") approach to the Great Depression, calls for greater government assistance increased as the U.S. economy continued to decline. He was also a firm believer in balanced budgets (as were most Democrats), and was unwilling to run a budget deficit to fund welfare programs. However, Hoover did pursue many policies in an attempt to pull the country out of depression.

In 1929, he authorized the Mexican Repatriation Program to help unemployed Mexican citizens return home. The program was largely a forced migration (i.e. deportation) of approximately 500,000 people to Mexico, and continued until 1937.

In June 1930, over the objection of many economists, Congress approved and Hoover reluctantly signed into law the Smoot–Hawley Tariff Act. The legislation raised tariffs on thousands of imported items. The intent of the Act was to encourage the purchase of American-made products by increasing the cost of imported goods, while raising revenue for the federal government and protecting farmers. However, economic depression had spread worldwide, and Canada, France and other nations retaliated by raising tariffs on imports from the U.S. The result was to contract international trade, and worsen the Depression.

Thousands of World War I veterans and their families demonstrated and camped out in Washington, DC, during June 1932, calling for immediate payment of a bonus that had been promised by the World War Adjusted Compensation Act in 1924 for payment in 1945. Although offered money by Congress to return home, some members of the "Bonus army" remained. Washington police attempted to remove the demonstrators from their camp, but they were outnumbered and unsuccessful. Shots were fired by the police in a futile attempt to attain order, and two protesters were killed while many officers were injured. Hoover sent U.S. Army forces led by General Douglas MacArthur and helped by lower ranking officers Dwight D. Eisenhower and George S. Patton to stop a march. MacArthur, believing he was fighting a communist revolution, chose to clear out the camp with military force. In the ensuing clash, hundreds of civilians were injured. Hoover had sent orders that the Army was not to move on the encampment, but MacArthur chose to ignore the command. Hoover was incensed, but refused to reprimand MacArthur. The entire incident was another devastating negative for Hoover in the 1932 election. That led New York governor and Democratic presidential candidate Franklin Roosevelt to declare of Hoover: "There is nothing inside the man but jelly!"

In the U.S. by 1932 unemployment had reached 24.9%,[115] businesses defaulted on record numbers of loans, and more than 5,000 banks had failed. Hundreds of thousands of Americans found themselves homeless and began congregating in the numerous "Hoovervilles" (shanty towns) that sprang up in major cities.

The final attempt of the Hoover Administration to rescue the economy occurred in 1932 with the passage of the Emergency Relief and Construction Act, which authorized funds for public works programs and the creation of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC). The RFC's initial goal was to provide government-secured loans to financial institutions, railroads and farmers. The RFC had minimal impact at the time but was adopted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and greatly expanded as part of his New Deal.

Although Hoover had come to detest the presidency, he agreed to run again in 1932, not only as a matter of pride, but also because he feared that no other likely Republican candidate would deal with the the Great Depression without resorting to what Hoover considered dangerously radical measures.

Hoover was nominated by the Republicans for a second term. He had originally planned to make only one or two major speeches, and to leave the rest of the campaigning to proxies, but when polls showed the entire Republican ticket facing a resounding defeat at the polls, Hoover agreed to an expanded schedule of public addresses. In his nine major radio addresses Hoover primarily defended his administration and his philosophy. The apologetic approach did not allow Hoover to refute Democratic nominee Franklin Roosevelt's charge that he was personally responsible for the depression.

In his campaign trips around the country, Hoover was faced with perhaps the most hostile crowds of any sitting president. Besides having his train and motorcades pelted with eggs and rotten fruit, he was often heckled while speaking, and on several occasions, the Secret Service halted attempts to kill Hoover by disgruntled citizens, including capturing one man nearing Hoover carrying sticks of dynamite, and another already having removed several spikes from the rails in front of the President's train.



JoshBot wrote:
Their defense of Republican values will not be forgotten.

Yes indeed, those three coins would be right at home gracing the Wall of Shame of any historical Hall of Infamy.


 
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jeremy cobert
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I found the Obama currency, it looks kind of bland, yet appropriate.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
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Mike Stiles
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galad2003 wrote:
The set only goes up to FDR, so if you want to list the Presidents of the 20th century in the set they are:

Frankling Roosevelt (D) 1933-1945
Hoover (R) 1929-1933
Cooledge (R) 1923-1929
Harding (R) 1921-1923
Wilson (D) 1913-1921
Taft (R) 1909-1913
Teddy Roosevelt(R) 1901-1909
McKinly(R) 1897-1901

The set has nothing to do with the best or worst presidents of either party. But if you want to infer some point about the set please enlighten us.


It is funny to me that of the ones shown, hoover gets a gold coin, and the others only silver.
 
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Damian
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windsagio wrote:
It is funny to me that of the ones shown, hoover gets a gold coin, and the others only silver.

They're all the same gold colored coins. They're part of the Presidential $1 coin series started in 2007.
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Mike Stiles
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damiangerous wrote:
windsagio wrote:
It is funny to me that of the ones shown, hoover gets a gold coin, and the others only silver.

They're all the same gold colored coins. They're part of the Presidential $1 coin series started in 2007.


Damn. Josh messed me up with his images.
 
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Josh
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windsagio wrote:
damiangerous wrote:
windsagio wrote:
It is funny to me that of the ones shown, hoover gets a gold coin, and the others only silver.

They're all the same gold colored coins. They're part of the Presidential $1 coin series started in 2007.


Damn. Josh messed me up with his images.
There ya go-
couldn't find it until now:

But yes, they are all gold $1 coins.
 
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