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Subject: Sonic's Repaints rss

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James Steele

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I've been playing since shortly before Wave 2 was released, though I only recently stumbled upon the forums here. Browsing the web I have see many awesome repaints for the various ships. Although not really artistically inclined, I decided I wanted to try my hand at repainting them as well.

I just completed this one tonight, my first apart from the miniatures from the Firefly board game:



I had this mostly finished before, though I was unhappy with how dark the green was after the wash. I opted for a lighter green the second go-round and I'm fairly happy with the end result.
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James Steele

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Just finished this one tonight. My take on Wedge's X-Wing.

 
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John Asurin
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SonicSteel wrote:
Just finished this one tonight. My take on Wedge's X-Wing.



Good version of the Bacta War scheme. I'd recommend a very dark grey* over the back area, leaving recessed areas black, to show off the detail.
A black wash is a good way to fill in the panel lines.

*German Grey(Vellejo) - or equivalent
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Will Morgan
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Nice scheme on Wedge! I'm a noob painter - just started with X-Wing about 2 weeks ago (painting).

I have a few newbie suggestions:

Get a lighted magnifying desk lamp - this made an immediate and huge difference to my ability to do smallish details.

Thin your paints quite a bit and put on multiple coats - it reduces the brush stroke and blotchy-ness. I still have no formula for how much to thin as I just experiment.

Always lightly prime - at least in my experience this helps. Black or white depending on the model. You may be doing this.

I am still using really rather inconsistent craft paints (the cheapest Walmart ones) and I actually do believe it would benefit me a ton to upgrade. I also have crummy brushes for the most part. I did finally go to Hobby Lobby and use a 40% off coupon to get a half-decent multi-pack and it has helped.

I am also trying to make my own washes with mixed results. The Future polish ones work well but I made some with ink that I like better. Still I don't have the proper mixing agents but am winging it.

The X-Wings are flipping small! I find them hard to work on I'm also no spring chicken though!

Keep it up - I think these things add a ton to the table.
 
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James Steele

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asurin wrote:
Good version of the Bacta War scheme. I'd recommend a very dark grey* over the back area, leaving recessed areas black, to show off the detail.
A black wash is a good way to fill in the panel lines.

*German Grey(Vellejo) - or equivalent


Thanks! I like that idea, black seems to be kinda... lifeless. Once I get a darker grey I will attempt a repaint.

Masterhit wrote:
Nice scheme on Wedge! I'm a noob painter - just started with X-Wing about 2 weeks ago (painting).

I have a few newbie suggestions:

Get a lighted magnifying desk lamp - this made an immediate and huge difference to my ability to do smallish details.

Thin your paints quite a bit and put on multiple coats - it reduces the brush stroke and blotchy-ness. I still have no formula for how much to thin as I just experiment.

Always lightly prime - at least in my experience this helps. Black or white depending on the model. You may be doing this.

I am still using really rather inconsistent craft paints (the cheapest Walmart ones) and I actually do believe it would benefit me a ton to upgrade. I also have crummy brushes for the most part. I did finally go to Hobby Lobby and use a 40% off coupon to get a half-decent multi-pack and it has helped.

I am also trying to make my own washes with mixed results. The Future polish ones work well but I made some with ink that I like better. Still I don't have the proper mixing agents but am winging it.

The X-Wings are flipping small! I find them hard to work on I'm also no spring chicken though!

Keep it up - I think these things add a ton to the table.


I just started painting a few weeks ago with my Firefly board game pieces, these are my first two X-Wing models (I have a TIE Advanced done, but parts need gone over again).

I usually thin down my paints, with the exception of detail work. For that I usually find it easier and less wasteful to use the pot. I've also thinned down a few to decent washes, though I find myself mostly using black (Citadel Nuln Oil) for the wash. Someone will probably set me straight, though I've been using an 80/20 distilled water/iso. alcohol mix for thinning my paints and it seems to mix well.

I jumped in head first with Citadel paints, since they're good quality and I can easily get them locally. My brushes are not the best, though, a few multi-packs from Michael's and two detail brushes I got at Hobby Lobby. I have one of the magnifying desk lamps, though I find myself not using it often. For me it's easier without it.
 
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James Steele

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Here is the TIE Advanced:

It looks worse in the picture, at least to me.

Here are my Phantoms:

I was going for a cloaking/decloaking look, though I think I overdid it with the 'stars' a bit. Luckily that's an easy fix.

I also redid the black on Wedge's Bacta War X-Wing per asurin's suggestion, I will post a pic of it in the morning.
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James Steele

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And here's Wedge's X-Wing revisited.

It is still a little dark, a 1:1 mix of Abaddon Black and Skavenblight Dirge, but it definitely looks less lifeless.
 
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James Steele

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Just finished my take on the Krassis Trelix Firespray-31. I went with more of a dingy look, with the exception of the guns.

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James Steele

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I was not happy with the way the Firespray turned out, so I stripped it down and repainted.



Also, my new brushes came in today!! I have a second Firespray I may break them in on.
 
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J H
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Re: Photos

Ensure you have sufficient area lighting and then take the pictures without flash because right now all your paints look very shiny due to it. This can make it hard to judge the true colour.

Re: Priming

Rather than priming your models black or white, use a medium-grey. It allows for much more accurate control of contrast when layering colours. The absolute best primer I've used in all my years is Tamiya Grey Surface Primer (https://www.tamiyausa.com/items/paints-finishes-60/tamiya-ma...).

Re: X-Wings

Green X-Wing has a bit of a blotchy, streaky appearance to it. You gave it a proper dark wash which has worked wonders for the recesses, but what I would recommend doing after this is going over the panels again with the green. Use two watered-down layers rather than one thick layer. It'll do wonders.

Black X-Wing is way too dark. The biggest issue you will have with painting things black is that there's no way to darken it. That's why professional painters, when painting black, actually paint very dark grey (or more commonly, dark grey-blue) which can then be further shaded with black.

I can't quite make out what the pattern at the front of the X-Wing is. Purple/gold chequered? Have you tried using masking tape for this bit?

Citadel Nuln Oil is a fantastic wash, but it works best on top of metallic or grey pigments. For that green you have, I would recommend Agrax Earthshade. Citadel paints in general are great though. No reason not to stick with them. I use them too.

Re: Phantom

Great idea with the 'in-cloak' appearance. Well executed but, as above, the black looks mad shiny so it's really hard to make it out properly. I would also make the pink division between black and painted areas much thinner.

Re: Firespray

Looks good so far. But you definitely need to go over those light areas with a second thinned coat of paint to get a consistent, even layer of colour. When you eventually apply the wash, do it in the recesses (trenches between armour panels) rather than over the entire model.

Overall I'm sorry if some of that feedback sounds negative. I've tried to be constructive and I'm more than happy to offer some tips if you want them. Otherwise, anybody who decides to repaint their expensive X-Wing models deserves kudos and great job for diving in and giving it a go!
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Will Morgan
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forkins wrote:
Re: Photos

Overall I'm sorry if some of that feedback sounds negative. I've tried to be constructive and I'm more than happy to offer some tips if you want them. Otherwise, anybody who decides to repaint their expensive X-Wing models deserves kudos and great job for diving in and giving it a go!


I found your post helpful. I'd be glad if you were critical of my first few tries also! I especially like the Grey primer hint and the paining dark blue/grey for a base on a dark model - I'll try that next time. Also - avoiding washing the entire model - I found it muddied my Trelix quite a bit - but was satisfied in the end even with this failure.


 
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J H
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Masterhit wrote:
forkins wrote:
Re: Photos

Overall I'm sorry if some of that feedback sounds negative. I've tried to be constructive and I'm more than happy to offer some tips if you want them. Otherwise, anybody who decides to repaint their expensive X-Wing models deserves kudos and great job for diving in and giving it a go!


I found your post helpful. I'd be glad if you were critical of my first few tries also! I especially like the Grey primer hint and the paining dark blue/grey for a base on a dark model - I'll try that next time. Also - avoiding washing the entire model - I found it muddied my Trelix quite a bit - but was satisfied in the end even with this failure.


Well, that's it. Washing entire models has the effect of 'muddying' colour which can provide a fantastic base to work rough/distressed paint jobs on to. Or, when neatly painted over on raised areas, it gives great shading. For the former however I would still recommend adding some small highlights on areas like corners, sticky-out bits and such because it enhances the effect rather than leaving the colours blending in with each other.

This particularly applies to areas that are separated by two different blocks of colour (ie. yellow and grey). By applying one identical wash over both colours, you blend the two together rather than shade them individually.
 
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James Steele

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forkins wrote:
Overall I'm sorry if some of that feedback sounds negative. I've tried to be constructive and I'm more than happy to offer some tips if you want them. Otherwise, anybody who decides to repaint their expensive X-Wing models deserves kudos and great job for diving in and giving it a go!


Thanks for the criticism! I can use all the tips I can get.

Part of the issue with the Green X-Wing is the number of layers, in addition to the thickness. I disliked it a few times, and as a result it has been painted over a few times. I would probably be best off stripping it and starting again. The second X-Wing I did go over the black with a really dark gray, probably too dark. The pattern on the nose is supposed to be gold/blue checker. I attempted masking tape (delicate) for the horizontal lines and it was a royal pain so I attempted to do the remainder of the checks by hand.

About the Firespray, the blotchiness/inconsistency is because I initially attempted to do an overall wash, then paint over the raised areas again with a lighter color. This lead to some blotchiness and inconsistent crevices.

Because of the light coloring, it is really noticeable where the wash has been. How do you suggest getting the washes into just the recesses? Is there some kind of treatment I should do to make it clean up from the other areas easier, or does it just take a steady hand?

I just got new (high quality) brushes in, so it should be a lot easier than the multi-pack brushes I've been using.
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J H
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SonicSteel wrote:
Part of the issue with the Green X-Wing is the number of layers, in addition to the thickness. I disliked it a few times, and as a result it has been painted over a few times. I would probably be best off stripping it and starting again. The second X-Wing I did go over the black with a really dark gray, probably too dark. The pattern on the nose is supposed to be gold/blue checker. I attempted masking tape (delicate) for the horizontal lines and it was a royal pain so I attempted to do the remainder of the checks by hand.


Handpainting chequered patterns can work. The best way to do this is not to actually paint the checks, but to paint lines. First paint a solid block of the lighter colour (gold) over the entire area you want the checks on. Then, with the darker colour (blue), paint horizontal parallel lines:

-----------
-----------
-----------

Now, carefully paint vertical lines in the blue over the top:

| | | | |
| | | | |

You will end up with a neat grid of blue lines. Because the edges of each square have now already been marked out, it should be easy to carefully 'fill in' alternate checks in the blue. You can always use masking tape to help you get these vertical and horizontal lines straight too.

SonicSteel wrote:
About the Firespray, the blotchiness/inconsistency is because I initially attempted to do an overall wash, then paint over the raised areas again with a lighter color. This lead to some blotchiness and inconsistent crevices.

Because of the light coloring, it is really noticeable where the wash has been. How do you suggest getting the washes into just the recesses? Is there some kind of treatment I should do to make it clean up from the other areas easier, or does it just take a steady hand?


Broadly speaking, there are three main ways to apply washes to models. These are 1) washing all over, 2) washing recesses only and 3) blend washing. I like using a mixture of the latter two for my models. I've taken a picture of a stock Firespray-31 and drawn over it with Photoshop here to (very simply) demonstrate the two methods:

Recess wash/highlight



Use a medium-to-thin brush and apply wash straight from the pot. If you have a substance that breaks surface tension (ie GW's Lahmian Medium) then mix a little in, but don't dilute the wash.

Apply the wash over the areas marked yellow. It doesn't matter too much if you get it on the raised areas, but you want it to flow into the recesses of the model. Such as the parts between the armour plates. Wait for this to dry.

Then, with a light colour, apply thin lines in areas such as those marked blue. You want to use a colour lighter than the area you're painting on, so in this example I would use a very light grey. You'll notice I'm only adding the lines on the top or left of the plates. This gives the appearance of light falling from a certain direction and helps to make the paintjob look less flat. When combined with a dark wash right next to it in the recess, it really 'pops' so to speak because your eyes are drawn to the contrast between the two.

Blend washing

Blend washing is used to slowly transition from a shade into a basecoat. It's great for adding depth and shadow to larger areas without darkening the model as a whole.



Use a slightly thicker/heavier brush and this time, dilute the wash down 1:1 with water. Apply on to the area marked yellow. Just as the light would fall on the edges in the first example, darkness would pool in these areas under the large spherical bulges of the ship. Now wait for this to try.

Second picture should show, roughly, what this would look like if you'd applied a black wash (eg Nuln Oil).

Now take the same wash and dilute it even more, up to around three parts water to wash ratio. Very thin. This is usually referred to as a 'glaze'. Now apply it in the area marked yellow in the third picture. It should completely cover the same area as before, but also 'stick out' below it. What this will do is make that shade appear to be transitioning from dark to the base model colour (grey) like a gradient.

This step can be followed further by applying consecutive lighter and lighter (ie, diluted) washes further outwards to get a smoother gradient. This technique is known as 'layer blending' and professionally painted models will use up to a dozen to get a really smooth finish.

Re: your engine glow on the Firespray

This latter technique, layer blending, can also be done in the opposite way! Instead of applying a dark wash 'inward', you could apply a light-colour glaze 'outward'.

Here is my example of the result when doing this. After having made the whole rear of the Firespray very dark (black and brown washes), I applied consecutive thinned-down yellow layers (GW Lamenters Yellow Glaze) 'outwards' from the engine. End result is this glow effect. I've marked with arrows in the picture below where I've determined which directions the light show 'shine' out from:




Combining these methods

You can combine both methods on the same area to achieve a very smooth transition of colour with the addition of an 'edge' highlight on corners. This is a very effective technique. By doing both of the above is how I did the green armour plates on the rest of the mode, here:



----

These simple techniques (recess washing, edge highlights and layer blending) are the foundation of about 90% of all miniature painting. The rest is just steady hands and good brushes. I sincerely hope my criticism and advice hasn't sounded condescending or dissuaded you from doing more work on your models - you're off to a fantastic start already. With a little bit of refinement and practice you should have some great figures.

Good luck with your future painting!
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James Steele

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forkins wrote:
These simple techniques (recess washing, edge highlights and layer blending) are the foundation of about 90% of all miniature painting. The rest is just steady hands and good brushes. I sincerely hope my criticism and advice hasn't sounded condescending or dissuaded you from doing more work on your models - you're off to a fantastic start already. With a little bit of refinement and practice you should have some great figures.

Good luck with your future painting!


Thanks for the great advice!!! This is probably one of the best posts I've seen explaining the different washing techniques, most of the ones I have come across deal with washing all over. I am going to try my hand at Scarlet's Firespray this weekend.

 
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J H
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SonicSteel wrote:
Thanks for the great advice!!! This is probably one of the best posts I've seen explaining the different washing techniques, most of the ones I have come across deal with washing all over. I am going to try my hand at Scarlet's Firespray this weekend.


Glad it was helpful. Show us how you get on!
 
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