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Subject: Comparison to other deck-builders: Street Fighter [random thoughts] rss

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Garrett
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I think deck-building is a neat genre, but I've found the theme in most of them to keep me from getting interested. Until last Saturday, the only deck-builder I was familiar with was Rune Age. That Saturday, I went to my FLGS looking to get some pick-up games of Star Wars: The Card Game, but when I showed up, I saw a bunch of people playing the Street Fighter deck builder. Of all the deck-builders out there, that one has a theme I am most interested.

After watching the game played, the thing that struck me most was just how huge the decks were. They had to be over 50 cards. Coming from a Rune Age background, I thought this was quite strange. In Rune Age I usually end with a "deck" of 10 cards or less. Destruction is so important. Looking into it more I learned that in Cryptozoic's games, each card in the deck is worth victory points, so the more cards you have in your deck, the more victory points you have. I guess this one mechanical difference is what changes the deck size so drastically.

On the one hand, I like the idea of having a deck instead of a pile in a deck-builder. On the other hand, it just seems like you're less likely to chain combos if you don't thin your deck. I think I'm going to have to try some other deck-builders now.
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Alex Martinez
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Rune Age is unique among Deckbuilders for exactly the reason you talk about, and it's probably why I like it the best among them.

In most deckbuilders, quantity replaces quality. There are a lot of cards (inevitably) that just aren't as useful or worthwhile as others. Players end up competing over those small number of valuable cards, and in the end, it usually comes down to whoever picks up the best cards fastest.

This isn't necessarily a flaw, but it does make the game play differently than Rune Age, where the small number of cards means there isn't a lot of filler.

Rune Age is also different in that there is a dynamic beyond the deckbuilding. By simulating a war between factions, you are constantly measuring when to actually attack your opponent and when not to. Every card in Rune Age can have value.

There is card synergy in the game, based mostly on how each faction plays. The Undead faction is most dangerous when it has a big discard pile and so on.

Rune Age remains my favorite deckbuilder because of its very limited choices. It might not stack the table with cards, but that means every card has value.

I do like some others though. I enjoy Thunderstone, though the game can drag or be over lightning quick depending on what cards you bring to the table (if playing with random set up). Dominion might have started the genre, but it's not all that thrilling me. But it's a good game as well.
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Kris Ardianto
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Rune Age is one of the best.
If you are interested on other deck-building games, I would recommend Core Worlds and Eminent Domain.
 
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mike m
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KingCroc wrote:
Rune Age is unique among Deckbuilders for exactly the reason you talk about, and it's probably why I like it the best among them.

My feelings exactly. I'm not sure if Rune Age is unique in this aspect, as I haven't played many deckbuilders bec I hate having a huge deck of cards to deal with.

Garrett, you might look into the other game Alex mentioned, Thunderstone Advanced, as a next step.

I've been playing a bit of TA lately, but bec having a small deck is such an important aspect to me, I have found it acceptable but not as good (for me). There are some ways to get rid of cards, and i'm sure skilled players are quite good at it, but they are less frequent and less obvious. You also get to upgrade some cards, which is a great mechanic.

I think there might be a bit overall skill involved in TA than RA, once you learn some of the build paths in RA. (But discovering those paths in RA and exploring their nuances will get you an excellent deal for your money.) The main reason I'm still playing TA is bec my youngest son - my main gaming partner - loves the game. So no complaints here!

If you don't mind the idea of a bigger deck, then TA might be perfect for you.
 
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Joel French

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If you guys liked Core Worlds and Eminent Domain (or even if you don't), you should give Star Realms a try. Amazing DBG, esp. one on one.
 
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Tomas Hejna
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Yes, SR are somehow similar to RA in that the cards do not represents VPs in itself - instead there are "HPs" for each player. The other similarity is that there is also some deck thinning, although more limited than in RA.

The differences are: SR have only one common pool of cards - there is no separated pool per players AND there are no cards "targetable" for conquer/destroy. Also, as the SR cards have quite strong snowball effect in themselves, it is much distinct here then in RA: there is some critical point from which it is almost clear who will be victorious. Furthermore, the SR play even quicker than RA (which is more scenario dependent).

I still prefer RA by large amount, but the SR are good for several quick duels and there are some similarities between both games (as opposite to other common deck-building games ala Dominion). Either way, I would definitely recommend SR to at least trying for several times
 
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