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Thurn and Taxis» Forums » Rules

Subject: Why weren't these rules streamlined? rss

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Jeff W
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I applaud the streamlining of the "Outside Baiern" rule. But why do the following rules exist?

If the player has no cards in his hand at the beginning of he (sic) turn, he must choose the help of the Postmaster for that turn.

I see that most of the time it makes sense to do so, but why dictate it? Besides being fiddly, it makes the game less strategic by having this unnecessary restriction. It is difficult to remember for the first time players.

There are two cases where you might want to do something else when your hand is empty:

1. If you have an existing unclaimed route. You might want to use the Administrator here if none of the face up card can extend your route. In this case you are forced to gamble that the two cards you pick up from the draw pile will fill your need. I suppose one could argue that one should plan ahead so that this doesn't happen. But all this means is that it penalizes the inexperienced, and if this happens to me when I'm just learning the game, it is the kind of thing that might sour me on the game.

2. If towards the end of the game you have no cards in hand and no cards in an unclaimed route. You might want to use the administrator to get cards that suit your needs better.

Administrator: when the player is not happy with the city cards in the display, he may enlist the help of the administrator to exchange all the cards in the display, before he takes a card.

Why have the restriction of "before"? I suppose that it is a family game, and this possible screw you opponent move is thusly outlawed. But it is again, another rule to remember.

Overall, I enjoy the game quite a bit. But these two additional rules kind of puzzle me--they make the game more fiddly, while making the game less strategic (usually added rules have the opposite effect).
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Galen
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what does (sic) mean?
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Richard Young
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galeninjapan wrote:
what does (sic) mean?

It means the bad spelling or typo is in the original source being quoted and shows that this writer is aware that it is incorrect.
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Jon Ben
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I agree whole heartedly with the first rule being gratuitous, but I'm a harder sell on the second.

I fear that not stating explicitly that the Administrator is used before drawing could lead to some confusion for the non-gamer. They may not even think of screwing their neighbor, then when someone does this it could lead to some social tension. Although this situation is contrived it is bound to happen every now and then, so perhaps it is better to clearly state this in the rules.

I certainly don't think this makes the game more confusing for the uninitiated gamer, if anything it takes a more serious player to realize that this rule is a bit silly.
 
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Dave Eisen
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I note this was discussed in another thread here:

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/119447
 
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Mik Svellov
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I believe the game *is* more strategic because of the two rules.

The rule about 'forced draw' if your hand is empty forces a player to think ahead so that he doesn't come in that situation - unless he wants it. Which is why both your cases (1 and 2) can be avoided by good play.

And hosing a player just for the sake of hosing them is not sportsmanlike. Not in family games and not in strategy games either. Thus the game is better by not allowing players to flush the table after they have drawn.

as for [sic]:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sic

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Marty Hale-Evans
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Great Dane wrote:
I believe the game *is* more strategic because of the two rules.

The rule about 'forced draw' if your hand is empty forces a player to think ahead so that he doesn't come in that situation - unless he wants it. Which is why both your cases (1 and 2) can be avoided by good play.

And hosing a player just for the sake of hosing them is not sportsmanlike. Not in family games and not in strategy games either. Thus the game is better by not allowing players to flush the table after they have drawn.


I'm not sure that forcing a particular person's idea of "good play" into the rules is a good thing. Generally speaking, I enjoy games that have a wide range of choices that allow creative thinking in solving the "problem" of winning a particular game situation. Arbitrary rules - rules that don't address a problem in mechanics - that force me to play in a way that someone else thinks is optimal are annoying.

There are definitely situations in which it's strategic to hose the player following me, and I don't think that's unsportsmanlike. It's just another strategic possibility. I admit it produces such random results that it's probably a desperation play, and given that I would have to be in a pretty bad situation myself (without cards in hand or on the board to play), it's probably better to play in a way that prevents me from being in such dire straits. Nonetheless, that's exactly when I might want to buy myself some time by trying to delay another player, if I had no better moves to make. In any case, there may be other reasons for the rule, but just trying to make people play in a way that someone thinks is optimal (strategically or socially) isn't a good reason for it.
 
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Tim Synge
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generalpf wrote:
W0tever wrote:
galeninjapan wrote:
what does (sic) mean?

It means the bad spelling or typo is in the original source being quoted and shows that this writer is aware that it is incorrect.

Pedantic note, but it should be [sic], not (sic).


How can this guy be a "New User" and a "Patron 05"?
 
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Eric Hymowitz
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junesen wrote:
If the player has no cards in his hand at the beginning of he (sic) turn, he must choose the help of the Postmaster for that turn.


The biggest reason is that, if you don't, then you will have no cards in your hand at the beginning of your next turn too.
 
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