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Francis K. Lalumiere
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"The winner ain't the one with the fastest car; it's the one who refuses to lose."
- Dale Earnhardt


For a long time, it seemed that Fate wouldn’t let this game see the light of day—yet the gang at GMT refused to back down. And now, after years of tribulations, they have finally been able to get Thunder Alley to the printers, and into the hands of salivating tabletop racers.
Was it worth the agony? Every second of it.

The brainchild of Jeff Horger (of Manoeuvre fame) and wife Carla, Thunder Alley is a concentrate of stock car racing in cardboard form. The game can accommodate up to seven players, but it also plays very well with just two, thanks to the unusual design decision of having each player control a stable of cars, as opposed to just one bucket of bolts. This guarantees that, no matter the number of players around the table, you’ll always have between 12 and 21 cars cluttering the track. And as any boardgame racing fan will tell you, the more clutter the better.

The game is played with a deck of movement cards. Each player gets dealt one card more than he has cars in the race, and each individual player turn is resolved with the play of one such card. Pick a car of yours that hasn’t moved yet, and off we go!

Cards show a certain number of movement points (from 4 to 8) and come in four different flavors. There’s Solo movement, where the activated car moves alone along the track. Then there’s Lead movement, where the activated car and all touching cars behind it move together. There’s also Pursuit movement, where the activated car and all touching cars in front of it move as one. And finally there’s Draft movement, where all touching cars both in front and behind the activated car move in unison. Each space typically costs one movement point to move into, although there are special cases (such as mashing an opposing car against the outside wall—good, wholesome fun for the low, low cost of only two movement points!). Many of the cards also sport a paragraph of text that will confer a special ability or impose a restriction to the activated car. Not enough? Alright: most cards inflict a specific type of damage to the activated car. Suspension, engine, body, tires… Some of that damage is permanent while the rest can be fixed with a pit stop. Too much damage, and your car loses speed. Way too much, and it’s headed for the scrap pile.

The trick here is to try to improve your position within the pack, but above all, STAY WITH THE PACK. At all costs. The reasoning being that a solitary car will move once per turn, while a pack of six cars stands a good chance of moving six times per turn. The lines of cars will break apart and reform (in a strange and mesmerizing mechanical ballet), but the longer you stay with the pack, the better you’ll perform.

Once everyone has activated each of their cars, the turn is over. An event card is flipped and its effect applied. Those range from simple things like car damage, to more dire circumstances such as rain, which ends the race right there and then if both rain event cards have been revealed. In addition to special text, each event card features either a green or a yellow flag, and those regulate pit stops. A pit stop is always possible between turns, in exchange for a slightly worse position on the track. But whereas green-flag turns are rarely a good time to pit—because then you have to catch up to everyone else—yellow-flag turns end with the whole pack reuniting behind the current leader. This gives stragglers a chance to catch up, while affording cunning drivers one more opportunity to improve their positions within the pack.

At the end of a set number of laps (between two and four), the game ends and each car earns however much points its position is worth. The team worth the most points is declared winner.


PRODUCTION

Thunder Alley presents itself as a massive package. The game comes in one of GMT’s “double deep” boxes, and it needs to: the two double-sided, six-panel mounted boards would tear anything else apart. The box also yields two decks of cards (movement and events), a whole lot of damage tokens, a handful of administrative tokens, and thick car markers with rounded corners.

All in all, it’s not a lot of equipment, but you’ll still be more comfortable if you toss the insert once everything is punched and bagged. Space-wise, those two mounted boards are real monsters.

The overall look of the game is rather subdued. The cars look spiffy enough, but each track is, well, a race track. There’s not a lot graphic designers can do to punch up that sort of black, asphalty playing environment—unless you go overboard like the original Formula Dé did, and I don’t think it would have been an appropriate tone here.
Still, it doesn’t make for an immediately attractive game when it’s laid out on the table; this may be Thunder Alley’s only flaw.


RULES

The whole rulebook clocks in at 16 pages. But that includes season rules, optional rules, an index, a glossary, a complete list of cards, and more. All told, newcomers are faced with only nine pages of rules before they can burn some rubber.

Draft movement and Pursuit movement come with their lot of intricacies as far as lateral displacement is concerned, and new players always need some time to wrap their heads around that concept. But once they’re over this one and only speed bump, the rest of the pieces fall into place instantly. After one lap, they’re already old hands who laugh at onlookers scratching their heads each time a player moves a whole bunch of cars along the track.


FUN FACTOR

As a big boardgame racing fan, I’ve seen it all (or so I like to think…). And despite my setting the bar rather high, Thunder Alley clears it without a problem. At first I wasn’t sure I would enjoy the game: the unusual mechanisms allowed for some strange situations that required special handling, and it all seemed too fiddly. But after my first race, I was hooked.

It’s a difficult game to juxtapose with another for comparison. It’s played with cards, so dice-based systems like Formula D or Powerboats are immediately out of the equation. I would say Thunder Alley falls somewhere between Wolfgang Kramer’s Auto Racing Series (with games like Daytona 500 and Detroit-Cleveland Grand Prix), where each card is liable to move a bunch of cars that don’t belong to you, and Um Reifenbreite, where moving entire lines of vehicles (bicycles, in this particular case) is an integral part of the game. But frankly, it feels and plays like nothing else out there, which is both an entry barrier and one of its most alluring qualities.

Of course, some randomness is involved: sometimes you get just the cards you need, or your opponents unwittingly give you the exact opening you were hoping for… Or not. Situations where a player gets completely screwed by the system are few and far between—you can usually play any card to improve your position within the pack, at the very least—but some players will have a harder time than others. And no matter what cards you play, events can also disrupt the best laid plans. Hell, just a yellow flag will spell disaster and salvation all at once, depending on whom you’re asking.
It’s the nature of the beast. And this is one beast I really like.

The box comes with four different tracks, but even with just one, replayability wouldn’t have been a problem. As of this writing, I have played the game nine times, and no two races felt alike. I have both triumphed and gotten publicly shamed, and I always come back asking for more. The game scales really well, from the six-cars-a-player chess match between two opponents, to the three-cars-a-player seven-headed monster. Randomness increases with the head count, both because each player holds fewer cards and because computing possible moves becomes a Rain Man-ish exercise. However, that slight negative is tempered by more opportunities for organic alliances that have two or three opponents work together to catch up with the pack, only to backstab each other once the finish line is within sight.


PARTING SHOTS

I guess I have to dig up some negatives here, right? Thunder Alley shows up with its share of minor misprints. One of them has the unfortunate distinction of being printed on all four racing tracks, but once you’ve played a race, you’ll never look at those movement tables anyway. Nothing here’s a deal breaker. The rulebook could have been clearer on some points (what happens to pit stops under a red flag?), but otherwise does a great job of teaching the unusual mechanisms that grumble under the hood, with plenty of illustrated examples to clear up potentially brain-melting situations.

Frankly, if you’re a boardgame racing fan, you owe it to yourself to check this one out. My coworkers and I were supposed to start another Formula D season this fall, but Thunder Alley rolled in and stole that parking space.
Tough luck.
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Ryan King
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Love this game!
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William McDavid
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Awesome review of the game. One of my favorite games. Can't wait to sink my hands into more of Jeff and Carla's games.
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Timo Prager
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Thank you for the review...im really looking forward to play it...!
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Rob White
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Terrific review of a terrific game. Thanks.
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Mike Brown
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Great review. Just got the game and can't wait to round up some peeps and give it a go.
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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Great review.

I too love racing games. Do you know Race! Formula 90? I love that game, I wonder how these two compare....
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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jbsiena wrote:
Great review.

I too love racing games. Do you know Race! Formula 90? I love that game, I wonder how these two compare....

Don't tease me, man!
The game is on my wishlist, but I don't see any way, curently, of getting my hands on it without selling one of my internal organs.
 
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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weishaupt wrote:
jbsiena wrote:
Great review.

I too love racing games. Do you know Race! Formula 90? I love that game, I wonder how these two compare....

Don't tease me, man!
The game is on my wishlist, but I don't see any way, curently, of getting my hands on it without selling one of my internal organs.


Pity Damn international shipment costs!! cry
I hope you will ever be able to get it!
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Simon Dunkley
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Nice review, yes the rule book has some tricky parts but the answers are out there.
Oh! my beloved Formula D your crown has fallen, Hail the new King of racers!!
Thunder Alley is an awesome gaming experience, I'm simply bursting with excitement to play again it captures true racing so incredibly well.

As you said Quote; "Frankly, if you’re a board-game racing fan, you owe it to yourself to check this one out."

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Cameron Chien
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rhox wrote:
Oh! my beloved Formula D your crown has fallen, Hail the new King of racers!!

IMO Rallyman dethroned Formula D years before Thunder Alley showed up, but I love all three games for different reasons IMO Rallyman is still king, with Thunder Alley a close second!

Cameron
 
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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Zeede wrote:
rhox wrote:
Oh! my beloved Formula D your crown has fallen, Hail the new King of racers!!

IMO Rallyman dethroned Formula D years before Thunder Alley showed up, but I love all three games for different reasons IMO Rallyman is still king, with Thunder Alley a close second!

Cameron

Rallyman is excellent, but there's the staggered game sequence that prevents it from really feeling like a race.
In my mind, Formula D is very close to losing its crown to Thunder Alley, but NASCAR might not be enough for me. (I tend to find oval-ish tracks boring.) but I can't imagine how Grand Prix (Thunder Alley's upcoming F1 cousin) would not dethrone Formula D.
 
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Cameron Chien
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The staggered competitors is how it is in real life. In real life the drivers are released, one at a time, down the stage, separated by one minute. It's Point A to Point B, not laps on a circuit.

Just some of the many things that separates rally racing from just about every other racing discipline.

Cameron
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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Rallyman is great, and even more with the expansión Rallyman: Dirt, but it's a different kind of game, you try to finish with the lowest time posible, but i'm with weishaupt, you can't say it feels like racing. I know that's the way actual rallies go, and the game get it really well but still...

About racing games, I dont' like Formula D mainly because of the dice, specially in high gears I feel the gap being too wide, two players can go out of a curve in same way but with taht die one can get so much advantage.....

My favourite racing game right now are, in the first place: Race! Formula 90, the Formula D I always dreamed of . Players have the control of the car, not dice. Great card-driven game with lots of strategy, racing feel and great simulation of a real F1 race.

I really like very much too a classic racing game with other theme: TurfMaster, this was my favourite one until Race! arrived. It's a really good horse-racing game, with positioning in the pack being the most important thing, and a good mechanism for leader catching ("handicap" for the first 3 leading horses)

I am now rading about this Thunder Alley trying to decide if I will like it. I've got two main concerns:

1- I don't know anything about Nascar races, so I don't know if I will get the fun in concepts like "working the pack" and so, or feeling right with the types of movement of several cars....

2- The events. ¿I feel this a bit too random? How important are they in a race? Can an event decide anything without a player being able to do anything? I think I wouldn't like that.
 
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Simon Dunkley
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Zeede wrote:
rhox wrote:
Oh! my beloved Formula D your crown has fallen, Hail the new King of racers!!

IMO Rallyman dethroned Formula D years before Thunder Alley showed up, but I love all three games for different reasons IMO Rallyman is still king, with Thunder Alley a close second!

Cameron

Rallyman is great to, personally I find it more of a push your luck game, do I play safe and roll 1 die at a time or go for a handful to gain those precious seconds at the risk of ending up in a ditch, and this makes the game exciting and quite tense to play. I think it does a great job of simulating the push,push,push aspects of rallying and the way the tracks are put together Is great, there must be thousands of tracks.
I totally understand your choice over Formula D.

The thing I really Like about Thunder Alley is the fact you race a team,
you need to make every position count also random event cards causing a little mayhem just to mix things up a bit, especially the red flag event cards there is a slim chance the race might even be stopped! I can tell you once that first red flag has come out all eyes are on those event cards after that.
We agree on one thing, I also love all 3


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Francis K. Lalumiere
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Zeede wrote:
The staggered competitors is how it is in real life. In real life the drivers are released, one at a time, down the stage, separated by one minute. It's Point A to Point B, not laps on a circuit.

Just some of the many things that separates rally racing from just about every other racing discipline.

Cameron

I know that's how a rally works in real life: what I was trying to (badly) express is that I really like the feeling of racing, and I don't get that in Rallyman (for good reason).
 
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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jbsiena wrote:
Rallyman is great, and even more with the expansión Rallyman: Dirt, but it's a different kind of game, you try to finish with the lowest time posible, but i'm with weishaupt, you can't say it feels like racing. I know that's the way actual rallies go, and the game get it really well but still...

About racing games, I dont' like Formula D mainly because of the dice, specially in high gears I feel the gap being too wide, two players can go out of a curve in same way but with taht die one can get so much advantage.....

My favourite racing game right now are, in the first place: Race! Formula 90, the Formula D I always dreamed of . Players have the control of the car, not dice. Great card-driven game with lots of strategy, racing feel and great simulation of a real F1 race.

I really like very much too a classic racing game with other theme: TurfMaster, this was my favourite one until Race! arrived. It's a really good horse-racing game, with positioning in the pack being the most important thing, and a good mechanism for leader catching ("handicap" for the first 3 leading horses)

I am now rading about this Thunder Alley trying to decide if I will like it. I've got two main concerns:

1- I don't know anything about Nascar races, so I don't know if I will get the fun in concepts like "working the pack" and so, or feeling right with the types of movement of several cars....

2- The events. ¿I feel this a bit too random? How important are they in a race? Can an event decide anything without a player being able to do anything? I think I wouldn't like that.

Damn you Jorge, stop talking about that great racing game I can't get!!


As to your questions...

1. I know close to nothing about NASCAR and I liked Thunder Alley from the get go. Most people I teach it to know nothing about NASCAR, and they all loved the game.

2. The events are really okay. Most of them are of the "whatever car has the most tokens of this type gets another one" variety. So you learn early on not to pile the same type of damage tokens on the same car.
The events in TA bring a lot less randomness to the table that the dice in Formula D do.
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Brian S.
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weishaupt wrote:
2. The events are really okay. Most of them are of the "whatever car has the most tokens of this type gets another one" variety. So you learn early on not to pile the same type of damage tokens on the same car.
The events in TA bring a lot less randomness to the table that the dice in Formula D do.
The events are the most random element of the game. A yellow flag toward the end of the final lap can completely alter the game, much less those events that can remove a car entirely or start a pileup. But anyone who has watched NASCAR knows that chaos is a big part of the sport and also why some racing purists thumb their nose at NASCAR. Yesterday's race at Pullinger's Pyramid Pocono, is a great example. Toward the end of the race 13 cars involved in a pileup and a very late yellow flag to have a three lap sprint for the finish. The real deal is crazy and so is Thunder Alley. If luck is unacceptable to you in games, then this game probably isn't for you. There's plenty of strategy, but be prepared for luck to factor in too.
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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weishaupt wrote:

As to your questions...

1. I know close to nothing about NASCAR and I liked Thunder Alley from the get go. Most people I teach it to know nothing about NASCAR, and they all loved the game.

2. The events are really okay. Most of them are of the "whatever car has the most tokens of this type gets another one" variety. So you learn early on not to pile the same type of damage tokens on the same car.
The events in TA bring a lot less randomness to the table that the dice in Formula D do.



Vrooman wrote:

The events are the most random element of the game. A yellow flag toward the end of the final lap can completely alter the game, much less those events that can remove a car entirely or start a pileup. But anyone who has watched NASCAR knows that chaos is a big part of the sport and also why some racing purists thumb their nose at NASCAR. Yesterday's race at Pullinger's Pyramid Pocono, is a great example. Toward the end of the race 13 cars involved in a pileup and a very late yellow flag to have a three lap sprint for the finish. The real deal is crazy and so is Thunder Alley. If luck is unacceptable to you in games, then this game probably isn't for you. There's plenty of strategy, but be prepared for luck to factor in too.


Thanks both for answering. It's ok with ten Nascar them, then.

But regarding the events...I think I can take the "whatever car has the most tokens of this type gets another one" type, you can try to more or less prepare yourself for these as Francis says.

But what Brian says can bother me a little bit more. I don't know if I want spend 2 hours thinking which cards to use trying to do my best to get my cars be ahead...and then in the last turn see a yellow flag that packs all the cars together so my efforts worth...¿nothing? I guess this may be the core feel of Nascar races, and it's ok, but maybe it's not ok for me. I will see....not decided yet....

Thanks again for being so clear about that, Brian.
 
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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Jorge, it's really not as random as Brian makes it sound.

A yellow flag does reform the pack of cars, but not in just any order: the cars fall in line behind the leader but keep their respective positions. First the cars on the track, and THEN the cars in the pits.
And since you want to be in the best possible positions within the pack, this matters a lot.

Newbies usually assume that under a yellow flag, you pit automatically: after all, you're getting back into the pack anyway, right?
Well, yes, but you'll be at the tail of pack.
Experienced players, in fact, take more time thinking over a yellow flag pit than they do over the regular play of a card.
I see this happen time and again.

If you got screwed by a bad hand of cards and the actions of other players, and you got left behind, you're hoping for a yellow flag, because it'll give you a second chance. It won't "erase everything that came before," far from it. But it'll give you a chance to try and get back into the race.
If you're in the lead and there's a yellow flag, no big deal. You're still in the lead.

I say give it a shot!
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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weishaupt wrote:
Jorge, it's really not as random as Brian makes it sound.

A yellow flag does reform the pack of cars, but not in just any order: the cars fall in line behind the leader but keep their respective positions. First the cars on the track, and THEN the cars in the pits.
And since you want to be in the best possible positions within the pack, this matters a lot.

Newbies usually assume that under a yellow flag, you pit automatically: after all, you're getting back into the pack anyway, right?
Well, yes, but you'll be at the tail of pack.
Experienced players, in fact, take more time thinking over a yellow flag pit than they do over the regular play of a card.
I see this happen time and again.

If you got screwed by a bad hand of cards and the actions of other players, and you got left behind, you're hoping for a yellow flag, because it'll give you a second chance. It won't "erase everything that came before," far from it. But it'll give you a chance to try and get back into the race.
If you're in the lead and there's a yellow flag, no big deal. You're still in the lead.

I say give it a shot!


Thanks, Francis, that sounds better. Brian's phrase: "A yellow flag toward the end of the final lap can completely alter the game" made me think different.

I would love to give the game a try, but I'm afraid that I am in the same place as you about "that game I can't talk about ". I can't find Thunder Alley in any shop in Spain, so it will be expensive to get.

Anyway, I will keep on reading about it until I can find it.
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Brian S.
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jbsiena wrote:
Thanks, Francis, that sounds better. Brian's phrase: "A yellow flag toward the end of the final lap can completely alter the game" made me think different.
In my last game there were five players on the short track and the first three laps were all green flag and the field was very much fragmented and I found myself all alone and two spaces from the finish line. Then a yellow flag event came out and bunched the field up. I didn't finish first and my team lost by a single point. I wished I had won, but I wasn't unhappy and still had a great time. That's racing.

weishaupt wrote:
If you're in the lead and there's a yellow flag, no big deal. You're still in the lead.
I guess I have a different take on this and feel that having a lead in a bunched up field is a lot more tenuous than a lead with a fragmented field or even solo. Early yellows when the field is pretty tight might not alter much, but yellow flags, especially late in the race, can certainly affect the game quite a bit.

weishaupt wrote:
I say give it a shot!
Absolutely. And if the events are not to your liking, you can always houserule.

P.S. - This isn't a two hour game unless everyone is new or thinking too hard about each and every move.
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Jorge Blazquez Garcia
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Thanks again, Brian. I think I have a clearer view of the events now. Maybe it's in the edge of the random I can accept, but I think I will give it a chance.
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John Roach
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Yellow flag restarts add something to the game but after playing this 4 times now we have had at least one yellow flag restart in each race and 2 in 2 of them. Also we have seen 2 yellow flag restarts at the very end of the final lap. This seems too often.
 
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Cameron Chien
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Why? Each lap in Thunder Alley represents up to 125 laps in real life.

Cameron
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