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Subject: Gaming table fun or uncomfy to play on? rss

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Robyn Z
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I saw a "gaming table" from geekchichq.com. the table is beautiful and looks well made.

My question is to people who have or have played with that type of gaming table is it fun to play on?

I look at it and think man it would be uncomfy to play on that table. Since i have never played on one i am ignorant. So you Gods of Game Geek tell me your thoughts.

What makes the rails great for gaming besides stuff not falling off?

Is a round or rectangle table best to play universal board games on?
 
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Robert Sell
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shallowz wrote:
I saw a "gaming table" from geekchichq.com. the table is beautiful and looks well made.

My question is to people who have or have played with that type of gaming table is it fun to play on?

I look at it and think man it would be uncomfy to play on that table. Since i have never played on one i am ignorant. So you Gods of Game Geek tell me your thoughts.

What makes the rails great for gaming besides stuff not falling off?

Is a round or rectangle table best to play universal board games on?
 
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Curt Carpenter
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I won't even consider one due to the feeling that you're playing in a box. I need to be able to easily slide cards off the edge of the table.

Luckily for me, standard tables are a bit cheaper.
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Jarrett Dunn
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shallowz wrote:
I saw a "gaming table" from geekchichq.com. the table is beautiful and looks well made.

My question is to people who have or have played with that type of gaming table is it fun to play on?

I look at it and think man it would be uncomfy to play on that table. Since i have never played on one i am ignorant. So you Gods of Game Geek tell me your thoughts.

What makes the rails great for gaming besides stuff not falling off?

Is a round or rectangle table best to play universal board games on?


I like ones similar to theirs (such as the one I made) because it keeps the personal stuff and the game stuff nicely separated. And with a proper playing surface you don't need to worry about picking up cards and what not (what most of us use to cover our tables with is best summed up as "mouse mat material" that can be bought in about 4'x8' lengths for about $60). It also makes it much easier to reach across and not disturb anything as the surface is usually about 2.5" down from where you rest your arms and such. It is actually tremendously comfortable in my opinion. Though, and I know some will get mad for me saying this, Geekchic is REALLY over priced for what they are you can build as good or better for far less and it doesn't take much skill. Or not as much as one would lead you to believe by those prices.
 
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Curt Carpenter
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mltdwn wrote:
Geekchic is REALLY over priced for what they are you can build as good or better for far less and it doesn't take much skill.

Nearly everything is overpriced compared to DIY. I think the only valid comparisons on price are other commercial tables.
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Robyn Z
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I saw the video someone posted on this forum. The construction of the table was disappointing. NO way is that table worth the price. i cant see it be to hard to make a table like that. it would be great if this site had DIY section for gaming tables to help people with ideas and problems they had.

My thinking was a DIY when making this post about it being comfy. would it be worth trying to make one?
 
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Jarrett Dunn
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curtc wrote:
mltdwn wrote:
Geekchic is REALLY over priced for what they are you can build as good or better for far less and it doesn't take much skill.

Nearly everything is overpriced compared to DIY. I think the only valid comparisons on price are other commercial tables.


Are you talking commercial game tables or commercial tables in general of the same quality level because the only time you start getting into the Geekchic prices of commercial tables is when it is something TREMENDOUSLY rare, or an antique. Hell even antique tables of comparable size are nowhere NEAR the cost (and I am talking tables in perfect condition from 150+ years ago). All anyone has to do is look at RubyLane.Com which is a big online antique selling site to see that. Also your 150+ year old antique table will probably be sturdier and still keep acquiring value where these plainly will not.
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Pete
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I would not be comfortable playing games on a table that expensive, no matter what the features are.

Pete (uses much cheaper office conference tables in his game-basement)
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Curt Carpenter
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mltdwn wrote:
Are you talking commercial game tables or commercial tables in general of the same quality level...

The latter. Or really either one.

mltdwn wrote:
because the only time you start getting into the Geekchic prices of commercial tables is when it is something TREMENDOUSLY rare, or an antique.

I'm not disagreeing with that. (Although I'm no expert in tables either.) So presumably one could say, "Geekchic is REALLY over priced for what they are. You can buy as good or better for far less." At least then you're comparing apples to apples. That's all I'm saying.
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Jim Bolland
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I think geekchicq.com's tables are more for games with miniatures or with a lot of pieces you don't want to accidentally bump and/or games that require more than one session to complete (the whole table can be covered) and/or games where each player has a lot of pieces in their own area (they have individual storage space) and/or where the position of pieces on a board or map is more important than where a player sits (pool tables are like this too). These tables are perfect for war games and miniatures games (often war games are both).

Based on years of discussions with my mother the architect and playing games at many tables, I've come to the conclusion that for most table games (social, played to completion in one sitting), the best table is round.

The main reason is that playing a game (like dining) is social. Everyone sitting at a round table can see everyone else at the same time, while turning their heads the least. Eye contact is maximized. The maximum distance between two people is minimized, making conversation easier. All of this is essential for anything social.

For games, there is another benefit. It is a lot easier to hide your cards or other secret information from the player right next to you when you are sitting along a curved edge instead of a straight edge.

An oval table is second best. As long as all the edges of the table are curved enough, it will do just fine. Oval tables are a great compromise between the classic rectangle (bad, see below) and a circle. The maximum distance between people is bigger, but oval is a very, very good shape. Specific to games, if the oval is too extreme, it's difficult for people on the ends to reach the middle of the table.

A triangle table would be perfect ONLY for EXACTLY 3 players. I think that's why they are very unusual.

A square table is actually better than a round table if you never have more than 4 players. But we want more players, right?

Hexagons and octagons can be OK, but for certain numbers of players, the players are awkwardly spaced around the table. For example, 4 players at a hexagon or 5 or 6 players at an octagon are not spaced well.

So round is best - it can have any number of players from 2 to its maximum evenly spaced around the table.

Rectangle tables are the absolute worst for games and for dining or any other social activity. (They make great work spaces - desk, workbench, etc. - when that work is not a social activity.) Their main disadvantage is that 2 or more people sit along a straight edge. They cannot interact well. Eye contact is difficult. It's especially bad when there are 3 or more people along an edge.

Rectangular dining tables are very common. It is not because they are the best shape for the people sitting at them, it is because they are the best shape to fit the room and/or the easiest/cheapest shape to manufacture.

My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.
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Jarrett Dunn
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curtc wrote:
mltdwn wrote:
Are you talking commercial game tables or commercial tables in general of the same quality level...

The latter. Or really either one.

mltdwn wrote:
because the only time you start getting into the Geekchic prices of commercial tables is when it is something TREMENDOUSLY rare, or an antique.

I'm not disagreeing with that. (Although I'm no expert in tables either.) So presumably one could say, "Geekchic is REALLY over priced for what they are. You can buy as good or better for far less." At least then you're comparing apples to apples. That's all I'm saying.


Good point Curt thanks for that...

So Geekchic is REALLY overpriced for what they are.



That should cover all the bases. However there are many out there that can assist someone with building one should you choose that.

I also have to disagree with the hex or round shape tables as they simply don't have the area needed these days for most boardgames. I couldn't imagine playing something like say Dungeon Pets or even Galaxy trucker on a round table when the space needed to not cock everything up is tight even on our dining room table with leaves in it. I couldn't imagine playing Arkham Horror, Eldritch Horror, or really anything much more than say a card game/largely self contained like Monopoly (using as an example) and being comfortable. Especially with my OCD of liking all my bits nicely sorted, in proper piles and organized. Heck I remember playing Descent 2E and Claustrophobia on the dining room table and it felt tight. I don't know maybe people like not being able to spread out, but I like have 24" side to side and up to 24" straight ahead to organize my play area.

Quote:
My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.


I can't imagine what playing something like TI-3, Arkham horror of the like would be on that small of a table. How do you not get everything mixed up?
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Robert Sell
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loon wrote:
I think geekchicq.com's tables are more for games with...


Very thoughtful information


My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.


Thank you for that.
 
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Jim Bolland
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mltdwn wrote:
Quote:
My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.


I can't imagine what playing something like TI-3, Arkham horror of the like would be on that small of a table. How do you not get everything mixed up?


Good point. You do need a bigger table for the games you're talking about. Big, sprawling games with rectangular boards demand a rectangular table. Geekchicq.com's tables are almost all rectangles and they are aimed at this kind of game.

I guess I don't play a lot of big sprawling games. But when it's time for Pitchcar, it goes on our big rectangular dining table! That's the only place it fits. (And a round table that big would be so big you couldn't reach the middle!)

For the games I play and the amount of social interaction I like in my games, a round table really is the best - for me. For others, a rectangle may be better.
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Pete
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loon wrote:
I think geekchicq.com's tables are more for games with miniatures or with a lot of pieces you don't want to accidentally bump and/or games that require more than one session to complete (the whole table can be covered) and/or games where each player has a lot of pieces in their own area (they have individual storage space) and/or where the position of pieces on a board or map is more important than where a player sits (pool tables are like this too). These tables are perfect for war games and miniatures games (often war games are both).

Based on years of discussions with my mother the architect and playing games at many tables, I've come to the conclusion that for most table games (social, played to completion in one sitting), the best table is round.

The main reason is that playing a game (like dining) is social. Everyone sitting at a round table can see everyone else at the same time, while turning their heads the least. Eye contact is maximized. The maximum distance between two people is minimized, making conversation easier. All of this is essential for anything social.

For games, there is another benefit. It is a lot easier to hide your cards or other secret information from the player right next to you when you are sitting along a curved edge instead of a straight edge.

An oval table is second best. As long as all the edges of the table are curved enough, it will do just fine. Oval tables are a great compromise between the classic rectangle (bad, see below) and a circle. The maximum distance between people is bigger, but oval is a very, very good shape. Specific to games, if the oval is too extreme, it's difficult for people on the ends to reach the middle of the table.

A triangle table would be perfect ONLY for EXACTLY 3 players. I think that's why they are very unusual.

A square table is actually better than a round table if you never have more than 4 players. But we want more players, right?

Hexagons and octagons can be OK, but for certain numbers of players, the players are awkwardly spaced around the table. For example, 4 players at a hexagon or 5 or 6 players at an octagon are not spaced well.

So round is best - it can have any number of players from 2 to its maximum evenly spaced around the table.

Rectangle tables are the absolute worst for games and for dining or any other social activity. (They make great work spaces - desk, workbench, etc. - when that work is not a social activity.) Their main disadvantage is that 2 or more people sit along a straight edge. They cannot interact well. Eye contact is difficult. It's especially bad when there are 3 or more people along an edge.

Rectangular dining tables are very common. It is not because they are the best shape for the people sitting at them, it is because they are the best shape to fit the room and/or the easiest/cheapest shape to manufacture.

My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.
We got rid of a round table about that size, because while theoretically we could reach the middle, for most board games you need to reach well past the middle (the opposite side of the board and possibly farther) and we are tremendously lazy people. It ended up being good only for card games.

I'll try and take a photo of the table we currently use. It's parabolic on both sides and elongated, and there is a mechanism that extends it from a table for 4-6 to a table for 8-10.

Pete (also found the round table incredibly irritating because it took up too much space for the number of players)
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Robyn Z
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Well thought out reply thank you "Loon". Being from NH its good to see others know about Loons

My thought was round would be better so every one could see each other. but i am still new to this crazy gaming world. we play from 2-6 people for games on a square table and wondered what the ideal size round table would work for up to 6 people thank you for the answer.

Since you have a big collection do you find the round 48 table work for games like: Agricola, le harve, pandemic, Tekanoko, and ticket to ride?
we seem to have the same tastes so your opinion would hold some weight for me.

My thought would make a round 52 inch fold-able rail table with poker felt.

loon wrote:
My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.
 
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Jim Bolland
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shallowz wrote:
Well thought out reply thank you "Loon". Being from NH its good to see others know about Loons

My thought was round would be better so every one could see each other. but i am still new to this crazy gaming world. we play from 2-6 people for games on a square table and wondered what the ideal size round table would work for up to 6 people thank you for the answer.

Since you have a big collection do you find the round 48 table work for games like: Agricola, le harve, pandemic, Tekanoko, and ticket to ride?
we seem to have the same tastes so your opinion would hold some weight for me.

My thought would make a round 52 inch fold-able rail table with poker felt.

loon wrote:
My game table is a 48" round wood table in a 12-foot square room. It works perfectly for any number of players from two to six, and well enough for seven or eight. It is nearly perfect. 52" or 54" in diameter would be ideal - up to maybe ten players and you can still reach the middle.


48" round works just fine for all the games you listed, but it would be nice to have just a little more room. That's why I say 52" or 54" would be ideal. With one of the bigger games on the table, there is only room for that game, nothing else like drinks or someone's phone, but it works. As I mentioned elsewhere, we usually use our big 3' x 7' dining table for Pitchcar, but everything else works fine on the 48" round table.

Our 48" table is a very solid office table (Steelcase from maybe 30 years ago). It has one center leg with four feet. The feet are low profile so we don't trip over them at all. The top is wood about 2 inches thick (at least at the edge) and the edge is rounded top and bottom, so there are no sharp edges to hit with your arms or legs.

52" is pretty big for a foldable table, but I think it'll work. To make sure you like that size, I recommend you find a one in a store, sit at it, and see how far you can reach. I'm tall and have long arms, so it's no problem for me.

Poker felt would be nice! I would make sure the felt is flush with or a little higher than the table edge, so you can drag cards off the edge.

We have loons here in Minnesota too - mostly the northern half. In fact, it's the state bird. I went to college in Wisconsin, so I got "Loon" as a nickname. (OK, it's partly the way I behave at times. )
 
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Braden Nash
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So most people are turned off to DIY tables because it seems like such a daunting task. In my opinion it is definitely not worth purchasing a table for $3,000 or more! I have very limited woodworking experience. Even with that I decided to build my own table modeled around the design of the Geek Chic Emissary... In total I spend 200 bucks, and about a month working on it in the evenings. This was the result. And I am very, VERY pleased with it.

I am one to enjoy the vaulted playing surface as it provides a great arm rest and contained playing area... The felt is so much more enjoyable to play on then plastic or wood.







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Laura Blachek
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shallowz wrote:
I saw the video someone posted on this forum. The construction of the table was disappointing. NO way is that table worth the price. i cant see it be to hard to make a table like that. it would be great if this site had DIY section for gaming tables to help people with ideas and problems they had.


They do.

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/forum/36/boardgamegeek/do-it-yo...

not all the threads are game table related, but i think I count a good half dozen on the first page, many of which would have comments on design decisions and techniques.
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I added a dice well to my existing 48" round table, and my guests and family love it. It's very comfortable to lean on while playing.

It's my Geek Cheap Table!

If you'd like to see it, it's in my images file.

(I won't post it here - - it looks a little tacky next to Branden Nash's table.)

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ldavi27 wrote:
I added a dice well to my existing 48" round table, and my guests and family love it. It's very comfortable to lean on while playing.

It's my Geek Cheap Table!

If you'd like to see it, it's in my images file.

(I won't post it here - - it looks a little tacky next to Branden Nash's table.)



haha, oh great! Now I'm "that" guy whistle
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Bradennash wrote:
ldavi27 wrote:
I added a dice well to my existing 48" round table, and my guests and family love it. It's very comfortable to lean on while playing.

It's my Geek Cheap Table!

If you'd like to see it, it's in my images file.

(I won't post it here - - it looks a little tacky next to Branden Nash's table.)

:D


haha, oh great! Now I'm "that" guy :whistle:


Not at all; you just built a fabulous table. A truly fabulous table.
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