Andrew S. Fischer
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You know -- where every card has some sort of special effect and lots of text. I, for one, am very tired of this kind of thing.
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Derry Salewski
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Pretty sure since roughly august of 1993, no, many people aren't tired of that.

But there's SO many games that have simpler cards that are good too. So there's really not too much to be tired of, unless one also gets tired of reading game descriptions before buying/playing.
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Pete
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asfhgwt wrote:
You know -- where every card has some sort of special effect and lots of text. I, for one, am very tired of this kind of thing.
At least you're admirably consistent with the brevity of your post. Not much text there...

Pete (chuckles)
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J Holmes
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Yeah Blackjack, how can Ace be 1 or 11?
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Brook Gentlestream
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asfhgwt wrote:
You know -- where every card has some sort of special effect and lots of text. I, for one, am very tired of this kind of thing.


Nope. I love it.

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Chris SC

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Since i play a large variety of games, i do prefrr simpler cards or at leat good iconography. Something like smash up is a bit meh since i feel like im constantly reading cards rather than playing.
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Curt Carpenter
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Yup. I strive for language independence, i.e. no language.

In fact when I recently played the expansion to Manhattan Project, I was like "who added all this text to my text-free game?!?" yuk
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Mike James
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"Special" cards don't bother me, but I don't like a lot of text.

Take Fluxx for instance. Fun game, but it's supposed to be quick. Games tend to drag because there is just a little too much reading involved. Once everyone becomes familiar with all the cards the game is great! But getting there can be a slow process.

Games like Race for the Galaxy is an example of special cards that are summarized quickly and efficiently. You can glance at the special abilities and know what to do, or not to do, with the card.

If you don't like these type of "special" card games, just pick up a pack or two of cards and hop on pagat.com and have some fun exploring the wide WIDE world of traditional card games.

Some non traditional games to check out:
No Thanks
For Sale
Haggis (sort of traditional)
Jaipur
Seven Dragons

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/|\ Roland /|\
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To a point, yes. It's the ONLY reason I didn't back XenoShyft: Onslaught.

Core Worlds, Bruges, Pathfinder Adventure Card Game: Rise of the Runelords – Base Set, and Dominare are bout the most I enjoy handling as far as card info goes.
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Andrew Shegda
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no.
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Stephen Williams
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Not generally, although there are some games that just have too many things going on.

I don't mind Magic: the Gathering, for example. I am annoyed at Killer Bunnies for this reason.
 
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Adam Kazimierczak
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I really only despise them in open information games when I have to crane my neck to read them across the table.

After playing CCGs everything else is easy to follow.
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Jimmy Smith
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Well, honestly I've always been "tired" of it.

I'll never be a fan of games where knowing every single card in the deck can give a significant advantage over those who don't know. If a deck has several different cards in it, I will always go through all of them (examples of each type) when teaching the game to new players so they know what things to expect. But that can be tedious, so I tend to avoid such games.
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Kelly Bass
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I too am tired of them, but I recognize that I am in a very small minority.

A lot of people in my group, and on BGG, love reading through the cards and thinking about the possibilities. Because it makes it easy to produce small expansions, I think this trend will continue.
 
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Pete
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All of the worst card games I've played have too few special cards.

Pete (buys 2-3 of them at every auction for $1 and they're terrible)
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Exception based mechanics, I've never liked them. Some games with them are ok despite having them.
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I don't inherently dislike them, but I am getting a bit exasperated with the extremely high prevalence. Annoyance comes from several sources.

In games, it is very fundamental that you know what kinds of things might possibly happen and what are the probabilities of those events so that you can plan meaningfully. This means that although the rules have been partitioned up and put on a bunch of different cards, you still have to know the cards or else your decisions in the game are not truly meaningful. There is no strategy with which to confront arbitrary cards with unknown rules on them.

Games with special cards are neither simple nor elegant. If you were to collect all the rules for such a game in one place, you would frequently discover that it is more complicated than Advanced Squad Leader or Star Fleet Battles. "But", you might say, "You don't need all the rules all at once." That's true of most all complicated games. It's true of the two I mentioned, for instance, where most rules are only needed when forces having particular capabilities are present.

Having all those differently-operating interacting pieces tends to lead to a lot of rules issues and ambiguities as well. Balance can also suffer.
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Sam Hillier
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j_holmes wrote:
Yeah Blackjack, how can Ace be 1 or 11?


What kind of god would allow that??
 
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Anthony Simons
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curtc wrote:
Yup. I strive for language independence, i.e. no language.

In fact when I recently played the expansion to Manhattan Project, I was like "who added all this text to my text-free game?!?" yuk


jmsmith2434 wrote:
Well, honestly I've always been "tired" of it.

I'll never be a fan of games where knowing every single card in the deck can give a significant advantage over those who don't know. If a deck has several different cards in it, I will always go through all of them (examples of each type) when teaching the game to new players so they know what things to expect. But that can be tedious, so I tend to avoid such games.


These two reasons about sum-up my take on special cards, with text-based function; however, I can usually tolerate it as long as there are not too many exceptions (for example, those cards used in A Study in Emerald).

chockle wrote:
I too am tired of them, but I recognize that I am in a very small minority.


I don't think you are in a minority; although I could be wrong, bearing in mind that the number one game on BGG utilises such cards in its core mechanism.
 
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Derry Salewski
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fellonmyhead wrote:


I don't think you are in a minority; although I could be wrong, bearing in mind that the number one game on BGG utilises such cards in its core mechanism.


Yeah . . . a quick count through the top 100 (especially the top 20 or so) suggests it's probably a minority opinion.
 
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Anthony Simons
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scifiantihero wrote:
fellonmyhead wrote:


I don't think you are in a minority; although I could be wrong, bearing in mind that the number one game on BGG utilises such cards in its core mechanism.


Yeah . . . a quick count through the top 100 (especially the top 20 or so) suggests it's probably a minority opinion.

I suppose it depends on whether we're talking about every card played during the game (as in TS),or just a few cards to be considered at the start of the game (as in Agricola); and whether one draws a distinction between common cards using common actions described using text (as in Dominion) and individual cards for specific actions (which is what I would call "special actions") as in TS again.
 
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Nick Bolton
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kaziam wrote:
I really only despise them in open information games when I have to crane my neck to read them across the table.

After playing CCGs everything else is easy to follow.


I still play CCGs where almost every card is special with a lot of text.

I don't mind this, although the small text is getting increasingly harder to read.
 
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