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Subject: Publishing Question rss

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Krawhitham B
New Zealand
Napier
Hawkes Bay
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I think you would be better off consulting a lawyer, rather than the internets...

Unless this is a purely hypothetical question? My completely unqualified opinion would lead me to ask you which is more important to you:

1) Having *your* game published and being in control of the decision making with the game (eg. they want to change the artwork so that the women are scantily clad and the men are chiseled).

2) Maximising the money you will make.
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Krawhitham B
New Zealand
Napier
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Again I will take an unqualified guess, because I'm enjoying this:

If I were a publisher approaching a game maker I'd be making a deal along the lines of:

1) I will organise/fund the final development of the game (organise the contracts with artists, printers, distributors etc)
2) All monies to the game designer would be based upon sales, other than expenses.

I wouldn't even begin to guess percentages, but I would say that the publisher takes the stand point of "We are the ones taking the risk, so we don't give you very much".
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Seamus O'Toole
Ireland
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You should check out the Board Game Design forum.
According to a pinned thread at the top of that
Quote:
Designer Quandary #2 – The Designer’s Cut
The contact will also stipulate how the designer will be paid on the project. Traditionally, most designer fees were around 3-5% of the MSRP (i.e. full retail price), 5-6% of wholesale price (what the publisher sells to a distributor, usually ~40% of MSRP), or 20-25% of profits.

New designers often balk at the seemingly low fees – but the reality is that when all the costs are accounted for, the “take home” earnings the designer makes can often exceed what the publisher makes. In the first two scenarios (% of MSRP or Wholesale) the designer gets paid for each sale regardless of whether the game turns a profit for the publisher. In effect, the designer is an expense that needs to be paid off the top. In the profit sharing approach, it’s possible that the designer makes less money if the game tanks – but if the game is very successful they may stand to make more. Particularly with crowdfunding, the potential revenues (and profit) under a profit-sharing scheme can be higher if the campaign goes well.

Further Reading:
>> A call for change! - Interesting debate on designer pay
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