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Quo Vadis?» Forums » Rules

Subject: How do people play negotiations? rss

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Jim Cote
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This was discussed in a thread under General, but I'd like to open the topic again.

1. How do you handle multi-way negotiations? If you make a deal for 1 vote, but need another in the same committee, is the first one binding (current turn)? Or is it only binding if/when the final vote is made? For example, I make a deal with one player for 1 laurel. I make a deal with another player for 2 laurels. The first player decides to vote NO. Etc.

2. If you cannot get enough votes to move, can you perform a different move? Can you perform a different action?
 
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Jim R
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I don't remember the rules specifics--they may not address your multi-way issue. We don't play very strictly, so someone could probably get away with reneging on a deal made previously within the turn, until some final action is made to seal the deal (like giving out laurels, or the action being complete). When you say "vote NO", you mean back out of their agreement, don't you? I always assumed that if you got someone to agree to give you their vote, that vote was always a YES (you can use it to move).

I believe that you can always perform a different move, or move the Caesar, after failed negotiations. Otherwise, it would seem to be too much of a penalty to lose your turn if you failed to make a deal.

It's a fun game because it is so quick and interactive, and the negotiations fairly straightforward.


 
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Daniel Corban
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1) The way we played is that every deal is in limbo until all deals are finalized. So in your example, if someone agrees to vote for 1 laurel, then someone else agrees to vote for 2 laurels, the first person can ask for a better deal. Basically, the player needing votes works the whole table until garnering enough votes. Once enough people agree to vote, then the voting is considered finished, the deals are binding, and the senator advances.

2) I know that you have previously talked about "failed votes", but I see nothing about that in the rules. A "failed vote" implies that you make deals, then "call a vote" which could possibly fail. With the method of dealmaking described above (which seems to be endorsed by the rules) there is no such thing as a "failed vote". You simply do not have enough votes to move that particular senator, so you attempt to move a different senator. If you are unable to negotiate the movement of any senator, then you must introduce a new senator or move Caesar. This is how it is described in the rulebook.

During your turn, you will always either introduce a new senator, move a senator or Caesar. There is no such thing as a wasted turn due to a failed vote.

Your original post also got me thinking about the way you are playing (or planning to play if you have yet to play). You are suggesting that the deal made for 1 laurel is immediately binding. Do you immediately give them a laurel? What happens if you don't manage to get enough votes from the other players? Do you still have to give that first player a laurel? This seems like an extremely odd way to play. You would quickly run out of laurels if you are handing them out even on unsuccessful votes. This alone should indicate that the deal made with the first player is not binding until a successful vote is finalized. This means the first player can change the deal anytime until then.
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Stokey Brown
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Regarding your second question:

ekted wrote:
2. If you cannot get enough votes to move, can you perform a different move? Can you perform a different action?


Page 4 of the rules state that you have 3 action choices on your turn. The one that's applicable here is the second option: "You can advance one of your Senators from one committee to another". This statement says that a move consists of moving a senator from one committee to another, which would not happen in the case of a failed vote. It's very clear in supporting the interpretation that, if a vote fails, you can try to get votes somewhere else or take one of the other 2 options available (i.e. a revenge Ceasar move).
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