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Subject: Iliad - A Detailed Review rss

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Dr. Dam
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Image Courtesy of mixmaster

This review continues my series of detailed reviews that attempt to be part review, part resource for anyone not totally familiar with the game. For this reason I expect readers to skip to the sections that are of most interest.

If you liked the review please thumb the top of the article so others have a better chance of seeing it and I know you stopped by. Thanks for reading.

Summary

Game Type - Card Game
Play Time: 30-50 minutes
Number of Players: 2-6 (Best 3+)
Mechanics - Hand Management, Set Collection, 'Take That'
Difficulty - Pick-up & Play (Can be learned in under 10 minutes)
Components - Very Good
Release - 2006

Designer - Dominique Ehrhard - (Condottiere, Lascaux, Montgolfiere, Odysseus, Serenissima, Sylla, Die Weinhandler)

Overview and Theme

Welcome to the tales of Greek Mythology and the Siege of Troy. It is a time of Greek Heroes, War Machines and the valiant Hoplites.

By commanding the many units of the day each player is trying to lay siege to Troy in order to win cards representing their great victories. But victory is never certain in such times and the victory conditions can often change.

All that is certain is that the players will need to carefully deploy their forces and know when to push for victory and when to hold some of their forces in reserve to fight another day.

The name Dominique Ehrhard was not a familiar one to me when I began writing this review. His most famous other design for me is Condottiere, and both games are likely to share a similar feel, that of a card-driven combat game that utilises different units and abilities.

For others it is likely to be Sylla, a Ystari game that I have not yet played. For me 2014 has been something of an exploration of French designs and this is another one, purely by chance.

I look forward to checking this one out and in the coming months I will review Condottiere and compare the two in more detail.

For now though grab that feathered helmet and join me in the ranks as we take a look at what Iliad...the art of war...has to offer.

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The Components

In all there are 110 cars offered up in Iliad.

d10-1 Army Cards - The cards used to drive the play are the army cards. In all there are 75 and they represent 8 different unit types. The cards feature a black border and the design layout is excellent.

Really nice illustrations fill each card to depict the various war machines, war elephants and foot units. At the bottom of each card a unit symbol can be found and these are important as each card that can attack lists the unit symbols that it can target in red. Unlike some games it is quite simple to match these symbols up to help learn what unit can do what. After a play these symbols are hardly needed as it is easy to remember.

Some units can carry other units (the elephant and the Trojan horse), so these units feature symbols at the top of the card to reflect the units they can carry.

The final feature of the Army Cards are the combat strengths of the units that are used to physically win a siege, which range from 1-4.

All in all the cards are designed expertly and look great as they do it. Why oh why the game didn't use a matte/linen finish in this production is beyond me because everything else is great.


Image Courtesy of cvandyk


d10-2 Oracle Cards - In all there are eight Oracle Cards with 6 of these being Thanatos Cards and 2 being Gorgon Cards.

These feature full-card artwork and depict either the mythical Gorgon or the head of a warrior...presumably Thanatos. That is all these cards require to function although the Thanatos Cards do feature a value of -1 or -2.

More on these later in the review.


Images Courtesy of onedayyou


d10-3 Hero Cards - The game features 6 Hero Cards that include the likes of Ajax, Hector, Achilles and the like. Again lovely artwork is used to evoke the theme of the game as the heroes stand in a range of combat poses. Each hero offers a value ranging from 1 to 6, which reflects their combat strength.


Image Courtesy of zombiegod


d10-4 Victory Cards - The Victory Cards represent the spoils of a successful siege and come in one of two forms. All but one of the Victory Cards are either City or Trireme Cards that feature nice artwork. These cards are worth 1, 2 or 3 Victory Points each.

The final card features the infamous Helen of Troy and is worth a whopping 5 Victory Points and depicts a gorgeous Helen lazing around.




Images Courtesy of Toynan


d10-5 Victory Tiles - Three Victory Tiles in the shape of Greek Vases (a nice touch) are also included. Each offers a different colour (red, blue and white) and they represent Athena, Poseidon and Agamemnon. More information soon as to how they are won.


Image Courtesy of ryanmaesan


d10-6 Reference Sheets - The game comes with 2 double-sided reference sheets to outline in brief how each unit works. These are handy when first learning, although they don't include all details.

I found them rather redundant as after one play it was easy to remember what each unit and the excellent card design is pretty self-explanatory anyway. But they are a nice addition and I'm sure some people have found them useful.


Image Courtesy of simonh


d10-7 Rules - The rules are well written, feature full colour and cover some aspects of the game in multiple areas so if you miss it once you will find it in another relevant location.

If there was one criticism it would be that the text is a little small and not spaced out well enough but that is really nit-picking in truth as the do the job well enough.

For a light card game of this nature I think the game has very good production values. I lament the lack of that matte/linen finish as I think the game on offer here is good enough to warrant that excellent quality level.

It all fits in a wonderfully-sized box too that takes up the minimal footprint possible. The box isn't quite as tall as the standard Fantasy Flight Silverline slim box (think Space Hulk: Death Angel, Condottiere etc) which is slightly annoying when trying to line up one's game boxes. But it is still preferred to coming in a box that takes up oodles of space.


Image Courtesy of vialiy


Set-up

The set-up for Iliad begins with each player being dealt 12 cards.

Image Courtesy of ArtEmiSa64


From this point on the remainder of the set-up is the same as it is for setting up each new siege that takes place in the game.

A number of heroes need to be set out face-up for all to see. The number of heroes used is equal to the number of players but there are some special rules for 2 and 6 players, which I will cover later in the review.

The set-up for each siege is then completed by drawing a number of Victory Cards and an Oracle Card. There is only ever one Oracle Card drawn for a siege, but the number of Victory Cards will vary from 1-3 based on the number of players also.

Both the Oracle and the Victory Cards drawn for the upcoming siege are placed in a line with both of those decks placed at the ends of the line.

The remainder of the Army deck is placed in the middle of the table to act as the draw deck. The 3 Victory Tiles are also placed in plain sight.

The above set-up is repeated for each new siege that plays out during the game. The only difference is that each player is given 3 new Army Cards from the draw deck to add to their hand at the end of each Siege.

Given that the players start with 12 cards, Iliad is one of those games where the initial resources are abundant but will quickly be diminished as the game plays out. The players really have to carefully manage their cards from siege to siege.

The Play

The play of Iliad takes place over a number of sieges. The success of the players at each siege will determine if they are rewarded with the spoils of victory (gaining a Victory Card).

I have outlined the set-up for each siege above so I won't cover it here again.

With each turn the players must select one of the following 3 options :-

d10-1 Play a Card -

Image Courtesy of Actorios
This option allows a player to get a unit onto the battlefield. Where it is placed and whether it is face-up or down will depend on how it is played. More on that in the Unit Analysis section below.

d10-2 Attack an Opponent - Allows a player to attack an opponent with one of their units. Each unit has its strengths and weaknesses in relation to what it can and cannot attack, which I will outline shortly.

The implication of an attack is that both the targeted unit and the attacking unit are both discarded, which begs the question...'Why Attack?' Well to win a siege a player must try and have the highest combat strength within their army. By attacking they can look to take out a high strength unit with a lower valued one in order to gain an advantage or to reduce the lead another player may have.

What this option does reveal though is that the players are actually seeking to create the best force on the battlefield rather than trying to actually siege the great city. I guess the siege is the thematic backdrop and the attacking is actually the game mechanics at work.

d10-3 Pass - By passing, a player declares that they are taking no further part in the siege. If the Oracle Card in play is Thanatos, then a player is able to take the highest valued Greek Hero still available. In other words the earlier they pass the higher the value of the Hero they can access. The value of the Hero they take is added to their total Combat Strength when determining who has done the best in the current siege.

If a Gorgon Oracle card is in play then the siege is effectively a battle to the death. As soon as a player passes, they are out of the siege and all of their played Army Cards are discarded. In this way the siege will continue until there is only one player left standing. It's brutal and card-sapping if two or more players decide to go toe-to-toe.

The upside of passing of course is that a player can keep cards in reserve for future sieges.

The flow as outlined in the above 3 points is all that Iliad needs to function. But what about the finer nuances of the game and what makes it tick?

d10-4 The End of a Siege - A siege will come to an end when all players have passed. However when only one player is left in the siege they can continue to play cards or attack others as they wish.

When all players have passed though, it is time to calculate the total strength of each army and this may require revealing some hidden (face-down) cards.

The player with the greatest army then takes a Victory Card of their choice. Multiple players may be able to take Victory Cards in this way based on their combat strength, depending on the number of players (and only when a Thanatos Oracle Card is in play).

What is certain though is that 1 player will always get nothing and the player with the lowest combat strength will receive the Thanatos Oracle Card (if it is in play) worth negative Victory Points.

d10-5Beginning a New Siege -

Image Courtesy of zombiegod
A new siege is begun by returning all Heroes to the central area, each player draws 3 new cards to their hand and the set-up process is repeated as outlined above.

What Iliad manages to achieve then is a game where the objective for each siege is the same but the conditions for opting out of a siege and the spoils of victory may vary (a Thanatos or Gorgon Oracle Card).

d10-6 The Athena, Poseidon and Agamemnon Tiles - Each of these tiles can be gained by and move between the players by completing certain objectives. They are directly worth a number of Victory Points.

In more detail :-

mb Athena - Is awarded to the player with the highest value in City Victory Cards. She is worth 2 Victory Points and she can only be lost to another player if they earn a Victory Card that sees them have the highest total number of VPs in City Cards.

mb Poseidon - Is awarded to the player with the highest value in Trireme Victory Cards. He is worth 2 Victory Points and he can only be lost to another player if they take a Victory Card that sees them have the highest total number of VPs from Trireme Cards.

mb Agamemnon - Is awarded to the player that won the most recent siege. This tile is likely to change hands the most as the game unfolds. Agamemnon is worth 1 Victory Point.

It is important to note that Victory Points (gained from Victory Cards + Victory Tiles) are only ever used to determine the overall winner of the game. They are not added to the combat strength of a player's army and vice versa.

d10-7 Ending the Game and Winning - Iliad comes to an immediate end in one of two ways.

It can be over when a player reaches a total of 12 VPs or more. The game will end immediately as soon as this happens...even if another player is eligible to take the next Victory Card after a siege that would give them an equal or higher VP total.

Therefore Iliad places a high emphasis on timing and going 'all-in' on what may well be the final siege. Of course woe be on the player or players that burn critical resources only to find that another siege is required to find the winner. devil

The game can also come to an end if the Oracle deck is exhausted and no players have reached the 12 VP required to win. In this case the player with the highest VPs wins the day.

In the event of a tie, the tied players draw 3 new cards to their hand and one final siege is played out between them to determine the victor.

The Army Cards

In all there are 75 Army Cards that represent the forces at each player’s disposal. I think it’s important to briefly cover the key stats for each unit as it helps to better understand the strategic importance of each and how they add decision making and options to the play.

The numbers in brackets after each unit represent how many times they appear in the deck.

mb Archer (9) - These units have a combat strength of 1 and they can destroy enemy archer and hoplite units. Archers can be placed on their own, can be hidden in a Trojan horse or placed on an elephant.

Inside a Trojan horse the archer is placed face-down. On top of an elephant an archer is able to target the most powerful hoplite within a phalanx, rather than the weakest, which is the norm.

mb Ballista (6) - The ballista adds no strength to a player’s army but it can destroy a chariot or an elephant.

mb Catapult (6) - This machine of war adds no combat strength to an army but it is one of the most versatile attacking units; able to destroy a catapult, ballista, harrow or Trojan horse.

mb Chariot (6) -

Image Courtesy of cvandyk
Chariots add 3 combat strength to an army, which reflects their importance on the battlefield of the day. Chariots can destroy archers and hoplites and unlike all other cards, Chariots can be used to attack directly from a player’s hand instead of having to be on the table first. This form of surprise attack reflects their speed on the battlefield thematically I guess.

The Chariot cannot target archers or hoplites that are protected (sitting atop an elephant or hiding within a Trojan horse).

mb Trojan Horse (4) - The Trojan horse adds no combat strength of its own but can hide and hold any number of archer or hoplite units. Units placed within a Trojan horse are always placed face-down so the other players do not know the exact value of the units within. Archers always have a combat strength of 1 but hoplites range from 1-4. In this way the Trojan horse introduces the potential to bluff the other players.

Units within a Trojan horse are protected and therefore cannot be targeted by an attack. However should the Trojan horse be destroyed the cards within must be revealed and added to the battlefield as single units.

If a Trojan horse survives until the siege is over and the combat strengths of each player are calculated, then a player's options increase. Units hidden within a Trojan horse can then be placed as single units, added to a phalanx if they meet the rules for a phalanx (or used to create a new one) or placed atop an elephant if there is room. These options are very dangerous and as such a Trojan horse represents a very real threat.

The Trojan horse cannot be played to a siege when the Gorgon Oracle Card is in effect.

mb Elephant (6) - The elephant offers no combat strength of its own but it will double the combat strength of the two units that sit atop it. These units can only be archers and hoplites and they are considered to be protected so they cannot be attacked.

Should an elephant be destroyed, any units sitting atop it are placed separately and adhere to the same rules outlined above for when a Trojan horse is destroyed (cannot be added to a phalanx etc).

mb Harrow (4) - A harrow is a wall barbed with sharp wooden stakes. It offers no combat strength but stops an enemy from using a chariot to attack, as units sit behind a harrow and are protected.

mb Hoplites (34) - The hoplites are the most interesting unit within the game, which represents the important role they played and the training that was put into them.

Hoplites range in combat strength from 1-4 and can be played as a single unit or used to form the devastating ‘phalanx’ formation. To form a phalanx a hoplite unit is added to one or more existing hoplites in a vertical column. The key rule is that a new unit being added to a phalanx must be of lesser value than the one before it. Hence the cards within a phalanx will have values that descend.

The advantage of a phalanx is that the combat strength of the phalanx is equal to the total combat strength of all units present x the number of units in the phalanx. Hence a phalanx with three hoplites of values of 4, 2 and 1 would have a combat strength of 7 (4 + 2 + 1) x 3 = 21.

When compared to other units it is clear to see the devastating power of the phalanx and this is pretty cool thematically as it represents the devastating nature of the training and traditions of the Spartans.

When a phalanx is attacked only the lowest positioned (hence lowest valued) unit can be targeted. However a unit atop an elephant can target the highest valued hoplite within a phalanx thanks to the height advantage of the elephant.

For the record there are 7-one strength hoplites, 8-two strength hoplites, 9 three and 10-four strength hoplites in the deck.

The only downside to the hoplite unit is that they cannot be used to attack directly. They only add Combat Strength for the purpose of winning sieges.

The Strategic Implications of Units and Battle

Image Courtesy of Yugblad


So what Iliad offers its players is a combat system, which is something akin to a scissors, paper, rock type methodology. Certain units can only kill certain other units and naturally each unit has a weakness to something. Bluffing is introduced through the Trojan horse unit and the abilities of the elephant and the phalanx allow the base combat strength of units to become greater than the sum of the parts involved.

In addition, the Army Deck is also balanced to ensure that only two unit types can actually attack and whilst the hoplites are the most common and devastating in relation to combat strength...they cannot attack directly at all.

Overlying these considerations are the importance of hand management. Going hard at a siege may cost many resources but it may also cripple a player in terms of their competitiveness in future sieges. What tends to transpire is a game where the player's fortunes will ebb and flow. They have to weigh up the type of siege (Gorgon or Thanatos), the spoils on offer and the strength of their hand in the first place. Sometimes the better part of valor is to lie low.

Then there are the machines and beasts of war. Whilst they don't offer combat strength in their own right, each has an important role to play. Given that a player can only chose to add a card to the table or attack in a single turn, the timing of how cards are played is crucial. If a player already has for example a catapult in play then it is dangerous to play a harrow as it could be attacked and destroyed on their next turn. What transpires then is a game of 'cat and mouse' and the permutations increase with each additional player who joins the fray.

The nature of the hoplite's attack strength is also worth highlighting.
Whilst it may seem great to have more of the higher strength hoplites, a player must recognise the value of placing lower strength hoplites at the end of a phalanx to protect the higher valued ones. Of course with only 7-one value and 8-two value hoplites in the deck, these resources are limited, so making a full 4-card phalanx is not easy.

The final element of the game worth covering here is the importance of negotiation. It is rather understated in the rules and we almost missed it in our initial plays, but making short term alliances or bargains to not attack a player if they leave your elephant unharmed are really important to the play of Iliad. Like many games, any deals made are about as water-tight as a scarecrow's backside that has just been shot with a barrel full of lead from a sawn-off shotgun. But they are fun to make all the same and the game really does make good use of the adage, 'The enemy of my enemy is my friend'.

All in all I find the strategic implications of battle and the card play of Iliad to be really tight. They create difficult and interesting decisions at times and they are very satisfying.

The 2-Player Game

When playing with 2-players the Heroes are not required but the Oracle Cards are still used. Naturally this form of the game is a toe-to-toe battle and the potential for any negotiating is not possible. All other rules remain the same. For me Iliad with only 2 players really lacks the elements that make the game fun. It really comes down to the cards that are dealt to each player and how far they want to go in burning their resources.

Personally I have too many other good 2-player games to reach for Iliad to scratch that itch.

The 4 and 6-Player Team Games

With both 4 and 6 players it is possible to play as teams. In both formats the teams are always of two players each and the team-mates must sit apart (not adjacent) to one another.
The game is largely played out in the same vein except that the number of Victory Cards and cards dealt at the start of the game may vary. Each player must still play their own cards to their own area and no card swapping of any kind is allowed.
At the end of a siege team-mates simply total up their combined Combat Strengths to form a team total and that is used to collect Victory Cards and potentially tiles. Of course the interesting part of working in a team is that both players can elect to support one another by playing different card types. For example one player may opt to create a phalanx whilst the other gets machines into play to protect the phalanx against attacks from elephants.

I must confess that I haven’t played a team game of Iliad yet but I think the experience would be worthwhile and add some longevity to the game.

The Final Word

Card Games of this weight and nature can often be a bit 'hit or miss'. Often the theme seems engaging enough but the play is quite simple, dull or one-dimensional.

I am happy to report that Iliad is not one of those games. Here the theme and the gameplay mesh well together. The need to carefully consider the forces that oppose you in order to determine your chances of success is interesting and the way in which units can be played is also varied enough to be of interest for at least 5+ plays before making a final decision on its long term future within your collection.

The consideration of when to pull out of a siege and claim the best Heroes is also an interesting one given that other players can still target your forces.

Rather than rely on a lazy victory condition of winning a set number of sieges, here the Victory Points on offer can fluctuate and be targeted over specific sieges thanks to the inclusion of the 3 Victory Tiles.

The production values are also very good, which ensures that the game is enjoyable to look at as you play each and every card.

All in all I recommend Iliad highly as being worth a look. The game plays quite differently at the various player levels and that only adds to its longevity. The fact that the game is all about player interaction is another point to make in the positive column.

About the only reason to avoid Iliad completely would be if you or your play group really don't like 'Take That' as a central mechanic. In truth it is fairly light-on here as only so many units can attack anyway. The game also encourages the players to hit the leader too unless they want them to run away with the win so that may be another consideration based on your personal preferences.

It reminds me a little of another card game called Great Wall of China. Whilst that title plays out slightly differently, I found some of the scoring mechanisms and ideas to be similar, although I do rate Iliad as the better of the two titles.

It makes me regret having to pass it on as I put Iliad up on a Chain of Generosity Thread before writing this review. But I may well get a new copy of this one so I can explore it further.

Till next we meet may your Phalanx be strong and your Trojan’s stand tall...


Image Courtesy of onedayyou


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Richard Lea
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I've always liked this game and prefer it to Condottiere. Thanks for the great review.
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JB
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Awesome review, as always, thanks.
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Mark Chaplin
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Great review of an underrated game.

Like you, I would always choose another 2-player game, given the chance, but some of my friends (and my dad) really enjoy this game with only two.



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Mavis
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Great review of a good game. Our group prefers Condottiere though so it probably does not get as many plays as it deserves.
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Joseph Arthur Ellis
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So underrated.

Despite putting this game in my top ten, I have yet to play the team game! But I hear it's even better.

Indeed I would never bother playing it with two players, but in this day and age there's so many great two-player games, that's not what I want this game for anyway.
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Sight Reader
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joepinion wrote:
Despite putting this game in my top ten, I have yet to play the team game! But I hear it's even better.

Yes, it is. One player culls enemy units that threaten their partner. A lot of frustrated nudging and signaling between players sitting across the table trying to get their partner to notice something...

The downside is that I can't pull it out much because it's a bit too complex for the non-gamers I play with. It takes a while to build up a cadre of players who don't roll their eyes when you try to teach yet another type of card...

A good game for increasing rules tolerance is Team Loot. This is because I can pair non-gamers together with gamers to scheme, and the non-players learn how rules are really tools that they can manipulate to victory.
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Dr. Dam
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Thanks for the comments and feedback.

I really am regretting having moved this on - so I will definitely be picking this up again when I see it on a shelf.

I remember liking Condottiere too but it will be interesting to play it again and see how I feel about it in relation to Iliad.

That review may well happen in the coming month or two.
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Dr. Dam
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sightreader wrote:


This team looks like trouble...the 'smile nicely at you as they crush your Trojan Horse and gut your Phalanx' kind of trouble.
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paul marquet
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Neil, you should definitly try Iliad with 3 teams of 2 players. It's a hoot! There is a lot of interaction and table-talk and it is also less luck dependendant then each player for himself. One of the points that become more important in teamplay is knowning when to pass. This is the only way my group wants to play it.
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Dr. Dam
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maniacea wrote:
Neil, you should definitly try Iliad with 3 teams of 2 players. It's a hoot! There is a lot of interaction and table-talk and it is also less luck dependendant then each player for himself. One of the points that become more important in teamplay is knowning when to pass. This is the only way my group wants to play it.


Awesome Paul, thanks for sharing.
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Kim Brebach
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maniacea wrote:
Neil, you should definitly try Iliad with 3 teams of 2 players. It's a hoot! There is a lot of interaction and table-talk and it is also less luck dependendant then each player for himself. One of the points that become more important in teamplay is knowning when to pass. This is the only way my group wants to play it.


I agree - we love this as a team game. The single player game is greta too. Never sad to see this hit the table.
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