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Subject: Epilogue in board games rss

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Lior Kiperman
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Many board games are trying to tell their stories - stories about war, discovery, economy and magic.

Some movies and books and with an Epilogue where it is detailed how things turned out at the end and bring closure to the story.

Do you know of any board games which end in a similar way? Instead of ending the game with counting victory points or someone being the first to finish a race, the game ends with players revealing their character's ending in the Epilogue.
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Russ Williams
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FWIW: as I recall, the rules to Credo!: the Game of Dueling Dogmas say that at the end of the game (which involves early Christian church political maneuvering and voting to establish which beliefs become part of the the Nicean creed) the players together solemnly intone the final creed which resulted in the game... and my gaming group long ago enjoyed doing so.
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Paul DeStefano
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It's a Zendrum. www.zendrum.com
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A lot of adventure games do it.

Galaxy Defenders has an epilogue to each scenario depending on how the team did.
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Andrew Walters
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The Awful Green Things From Outer Space has an epilogue, combination of choose-your-own-adventure and some die rolling. The epilog comes into play if the crew escape the ship and try to make it home in the ship's boats. You go through it for each boat - the cockboat, the saucer, and he scout. It can take a little long, and the crew are pretty likely to starve in space. Still, it's narratively quite nice. Technically it can also be a winning strategy...
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Nathan
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Hanabi tells you at the end of the game what the spectators think of your firework display.
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Joe
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Betrayal at House on the Hill has ending wrap-up paragraphs depending on who won. You don't actively play through them though.

Lots of solo games do this. For example Nemo's War gives you a different ending based on which path to victory you chose to focus on and how well you did with that goal.
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Sturv Tafvherd
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I'd say that anything that involves revealing hidden information at the end of the game would probably be considered as "epilogue".

Clue : revealing the actual who, where, and with what.

Ticket to Ride : revealing everyone's route tickets (and scoring for it)

Love Letter : revealing your card (if you survived)

Werewolf : revealing everyone's roles

One Night Ultimate Werewolf : the storytelling of who you really are, what you thought you were, and what you thought everyone else was.

etc, etc
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Matt Pierce
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Betrayal at the house on the hill does this pretty literally. After the good guys win or lose there is an ending paragraph explaining what the heck happened and why your friend suddenly became the lord of fire bats.

also pushing into the realm of RPGs, (but I consider it a storytelling party game) FIASCO always ends with a wrap-up for each character where you find out just how horribly your characters life went after the misadventure.
 
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Lior Kiperman
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I am starting to design a board game, and I wasn't sure how I prefer the ending of the game to look like.

I thought about giving the players hidden mission cards which represents their character's goals and ambitions in life. Then at the end of the game, based on how things turned out for each player, they will reveal what has happened to each character. The goal of the game will be to get as close to your goals as possible.
 
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Cornixt
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HealingAura wrote:
Instead of ending the game with counting victory points or someone being the first to finish a race, the game ends with players revealing their character's ending in the Epilogue.


I don't know of games that specifically do that, but I think it might actually be an amusing way to end every game.

Dominion: And lo, King John gained more land than his compatriots, spanning several provinces, with numerous mines and villages, but the foreign witches had placed too many curses on him and he died alone without any true friends and family.

Munchkin: Julius the cleric, having defeated the monsters of the dungeon through cunning and luck, sold all of his weapons and potions to buy a small chapel where he lived peacefully for the rest of his life. He was survived by his porter, Derek, who he met in the dungeon and who also never married.

Mousetrap: Billy the mouse unwittingly constructed the tool of his own demise, and despite several near misses as he ran in circles for much of the latter part of his life, he was eventually caught in a cage and then eaten by a cat.
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Matt Pierce
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Now that I think about it, the only rewarding part of 'the game of life' is to lay out your random accomplishments and be like 'that was my life now it's over'.

Imagine how rewarding that would feel if you actually had some choices to make in the game itself!
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Sturv Tafvherd
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sakket wrote:
Now that I think about it, the only rewarding part of 'the game of life' is to lay out your random accomplishments and be like 'that was my life now it's over'.

Imagine how rewarding that would feel if you actually had some choices to make in the game itself!


Once again, one of favorite CCG's seems relevant to this discussion.

I enjoyed Babylon 5 Collectible Card Game, and in this case, it's worth mentioning that the sealed deck games were extremely enjoyable. Each deck is aligned to a race, and has a few "Agenda" cards and a lot of "Conflict" cards. Those Agenda and Conflict cards are essentially at the crux of decisions that lead to winning or losing the game.

Agendas can be revealed early or late in the game; and usually, it's that late-game Agenda reveal that starts the endgame (or even cause the game to end).

Each conflict can also trigger cards that are collectively called "Aftermaths". They're not really epilogues, but they do add an interesting twist.


We don't really have a habit of reviewing the game afterward, but it could be said that each player's set of conflicts, aftermaths, and agenda would form the "storyline" from their point of view. And in "social play", the player could act out an appropriate "epilogue". Social play tournaments allow the judges to award players who made the game fun by being "in-character"



....

somewhat similarly, A Game of Thrones Collectible Card Game has those plot cards that contribute a lot to the "storyline" that each player contributes to the game. So, if there were a kind-of social play tournament rule in effect, it would be interesting if the players were "in-character" and looked at their history of plot cards and made an epilogue.
 
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Nate K
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My own Enki-Des: The Soul Gates does this.
 
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Christian Gienger
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The Ravens of Thri Sahashri does have an epilogue.
 
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Steven Tu
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The more "cinematic" a game (Arkham Horror, Mice and Mystics, etc etc), the more they rely on storytelling and the more they have "epilogues"... And mid-story bridges, and intros, etc.

On the other hand, some games that are good at storytelling BY MECHANIC needs no fanciful words, but instead leave the game in the player's mind in the form of EXPERIENCE. I love those
 
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John Breckenridge
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In the storytelling game Ace Detective, the winning player gets to tell the end of the story, where the detective wraps up the case and fills in the details of how the culprit did it.
 
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James Hutchings
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In my experience, a lot of games have an 'informal epilogue', where players explain particular moves they made and so on.
 
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