jeremy cobert
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Well this book just went to the top of my reading list.

http://www.amazon.com/This-Nonviolent-Stuffll-Get-Killed/dp/...


And it certainly explains the DemocRats obsession with restricting gun rights. In the 1960's a black man with a gun was a clear and present danger to them.

http://reason.com/archives/2014/07/22/how-crazy-negroes-with...

Quote:
This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible

Knowing that he was always at risk of being attacked by white supremacists, Howard took full advantage of Mississippi's loose gun laws. He wore a pistol on his hip, displayed a rifle in the back window of his Cadillac, and lived in a compound secured by round-the-clock armed guards. Black reporters covering the civil rights movement in Mississippi often stayed in Howard's home, which contained stacks of weapons, at least one submachine gun, and, according to one visiting journalist, "a long gun, a shotgun or a rifle in every corner of every room."


Stay classy my gun grabbing friends, stay classy !
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J
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The NRA was all for gun control when the Black Panthers started arming themselves.
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Josh
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Jeremy's ability to trumpet disproven lies puts him at a level below what a lot of folks view slater at. Slater may pick an opinion and stick to it, but it's just that, an opinion. Jeremy blatantly ignores actual facts. It's the difference between someone arguing chocolate doesn't taste good and someone arguing that grass isn't (normally) green.
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pronoblem baalberith
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Check out The Spook Who Sat by the Door by Sam Greenlee. It was also made in to a pretty exceptional film. As controversial as the book is, it became required reading at the FBI academy.
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Boaty McBoatface
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Shadrach wrote:
Jeremy's ability to trumpet disproven lies puts him at a level below what a lot of folks view slater at. Slater may pick an opinion and stick to it, but it's just that, an opinion. Jeremy blatantly ignores actual facts. It's the difference between someone arguing chocolate doesn't taste good and someone arguing that grass isn't (normally) green.
OI!, did you not know everything I say is WRONG!.
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Boaty McBoatface
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So, he needed armed guards, despite being armed?
 
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Damian
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jeremycobert wrote:
And it certainly explains the DemocRats obsession with restricting gun rights. In the 1960's a black man with a gun was a clear and present danger to them.

You mean well known Democrat Ronald Reagan, who signed the Mulford Act in response to armed Black Panther activity?

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James King
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jeremycobert wrote:
Well this book just went to the top of my reading list.

http://www.amazon.com/This-Nonviolent-Stuffll-Get-Killed/dp/...


And it certainly explains the DemocRats obsession with restricting gun rights. In the 1960's a black man with a gun was a clear and present danger to them.

http://reason.com/archives/2014/07/22/how-crazy-negroes-with...

Quote:
This Nonviolent Stuff'll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible

Knowing that he was always at risk of being attacked by white supremacists, Howard took full advantage of Mississippi's loose gun laws. He wore a pistol on his hip, displayed a rifle in the back window of his Cadillac, and lived in a compound secured by round-the-clock armed guards. Black reporters covering the civil rights movement in Mississippi often stayed in Howard's home, which contained stacks of weapons, at least one submachine gun, and, according to one visiting journalist, "a long gun, a shotgun or a rifle in every corner of every room."


Stay classy my gun grabbing friends, stay classy !

Because you sure aren't!

After all, African Americans' concern back then was NOT starting an armed revolution but staying alive by maintaining *self-defense.*

“Cobb… reviews the long tradition of self-protection among African Americans, who knew they could not rely on local law enforcement for protection… Understanding how the use of guns makes this history of the civil rights movement more compelling to readers, Cobb is nonetheless focused on the determination of ordinary citizens, women included, to win their rights, even if that meant packing a pistol in a pocket or purse.”Booklist


It would also appear that you failed to read page 2 of the following article:


> Excerpt from Page 2 of "How "Crazy Negroes" With Guns Helped Kill Jim Crow: Civil Rights and Armed Self-Defense in the South" by Thaddeus Russell from the August/September 2014 edition of Reason magazine:

Anti-racist proponents of gun control should note an irony in this story: One aspect of Southern culture allowed for the dismantling of another. "Although many whites were uncomfortable with the idea of blacks owning guns-especially in the 1960s," Cobb writes, "the South's powerful gun culture and weak gun control laws enabled black people to acquire and keep weapons and ammunition with relative ease." One example of this came in 1954, when the Mississippi state legislator Edwin White responded to an increase in black gun ownership with a bill requiring gun registration as protection "from those likely to cause us trouble," but the bill died in committee.

Guns weren't the only physical weapons used to advance civil rights. Five days after the famous 1960 sit-in at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, another sit-in was attempted but the protesters were blocked from entering the store by crowds of young whites carrying Confederate flags and threatening violence. So football players from the historically black North Carolina Agricultural and Technical College formed a flying wedge and rammed through the mob. In Jacksonville, Florida, a gang of black youth known as the Boomerangs used their fists to beat back a group of whites who were attacking sit-in protestors with ax handles.

Two of the best-known Civil Rights organizations practicing armed self-defense were the Deacons for Defense and Justice, which was formally incorporated in Louisiana in 1965 with the explicit purpose of providing armed protection for civil rights activists, and the Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO) of Alabama, a SNCC affiliate that renounced the national organization's nonviolent philosophy and helped inspire the formation of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense in northern cities.

The Deacons appeared at protests toting rifles and gained special notoriety when they aimed their guns at firemen who were preparing to unleash hoses on a group of black high school students in Jonesboro, Louisiana, as they picketed for black control of black schools. The LCFO-headed by Stokely Carmichael, who coined the slogan "Black Power", was staffed by well-armed organizers who increased the number of black voters in Lowndes County from one, when the group was established in 1965, to almost 2,000 members a year later.

Though national Civil Rights leaders publicly renounced the use of violence, many of them privately relied on it. Even the great American apostle of nonviolence himself tacitly acknowledged the value of guns. During the Montgomery Bus Boycott of 1955 and 1956, King applied for a permit to carry a concealed weapon. He was denied the license but filled his home with firearms and allowed armed neighbors to stand guard over his family and property. More than one visitor to King's house in Montgomery described it as "an arsenal."

King wasn't the only civil rights leader who relied on "crazy Negroes." Indeed, according to Cobb, even though most of the major civil rights organizations of the period were formally committed to nonviolence, "there were few black leaders who did not seek and receive armed protection from within the black community." Many also maintained their own means of protection. Fannie Lou Hamer, whose fearlessness as an organizer in the most violent regions of Mississippi is legendary, held no qualms about owning or using firearms. "I keep a shotgun in every corner of my bedroom," she said, "and the first cracker even looks like he wants to throw some dynamite on my porch won't write his mama again."

Cobb concludes from these and many other examples of black armed self-defense that the current tendency among liberals to think of gun rights as a cause championed by racists is wrong-headed. Though "largely associated with the conservative white Right, there was a time when people on both sides of America's racial divide embraced their right to self- protection, and when rights were won because of it."

_________________________________________________



jeremycobert wrote:
And it certainly explains the DemocRats' obsession with restricting gun rights. In the 1960's a black man with a gun was a clear and present danger to them.

Notably, the greater majority of those Democrats of the 1960s concerned about African Americans bearing arms in self-defense were Dixiecrats, many, if not most, of whom would eventually join the Republican Party after Democratic President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law.

Modern-day Democrats and Independents are concerned about the over-proliferation of guns; implementation of e-Verification systems; prevention of illegal purchases of guns; and the failure to outlaw battlefield weapons of war and assault rifles from public purchase.


 
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