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Subject: One Specific, One General rss

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So I am trying to learn OCS solo using RE. So far I have read through all the rules and played through the Playbook, making all the same moves on the board. I'm starting to understand some of it, although I expect it will take a long time to not be reviewing the rules a lot. That said you can probably expect a bunch of questions from me, so thanks in advance. My first question is about repairing aircraft. I understand how to refit and make an inactive plane active, but how do you replace a step loss from a plane?

My much more general question is for veterans of the system. What are the two or three things that are most important to focus on when deciding what to do for your turn? It seems like there are about 100 different choices (which is very exciting), but seems to cause instant analysis paralysis.
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Ryan Powers
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Huger wrote:
I understand how to refit and make an inactive plane active, but how do you replace a step loss from a plane?


There are two ways in RE:

1) You can rebuild air units with EQ replacements, which the Commonwealth can get by rolling on the Replacement Table. The Vichy are out of luck. (13.5a)

2) You can also rebuild them using Aircraft replacement steps. The Commonwealth gets two of these on Turn 10. The Vichy are again out of luck. (13.5f)
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Lorn Fluke
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Do you recall how they came to that place?
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And we sang of our lightnings and shapeful disgrace?
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In the series rules it says you can use one EQ replacement to repair or rebuild 2 plane steps. RE also has a free, use it or lose it bonus of 2 Commonwealth air unit steps on the reinforcement track.

As far as things to concentrate on - supply, supply and supply.
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Ok, I'm impressed. Three answers in under 20 minutes. Thank you all and if anyone else wants to comment on the general part please do.
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武士に二言無し
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Europe + Earth + Via Lactea
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Hi,

Generally speaking, two o three "things" you MUST observe:

1. Don't let your supply depots alone ... without garrison, so the HQs!
2. Don't let your SD hexes without garrison or you'll lose miserably.
3. Check every turn your supply lines, above all, crucial point like road-rail intersections, bridge and pass.
4. Put, at least, one artillery or armored/mechanized unit in reserve, with sufficient movement points to be useful: they can ruin the enemy plan.
5. Keep your valuable "schwerpunkt" units under CAP umbrella, if they're DG they're almost always useless.
6. Play, play and ... play.

Have nice wargames,

F.

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Charlie Sheppard
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These are my tips for OCS in general copy and pasted from another thread. They may not be quite as applicable in a game as small as RE.

Learn to use reserves effectively, both in exploit and in reaction but especially in exploit. Use the division markers, not just to help manage big stacks, but to also hide your intentions.

Remember that OCS rewards "strategic pauses". Burning supply piecemeal as it becomes available is like committing units piecemeal. Wait and build it up.

Learn to build effective supply and air networks and then learn how to extend them forward. This, in conjunction with disrupting your opponent's supply network, will become the basis of much (all?) of your planning.

Learn to manage the *mechanics* of your supply network effectively. I've noticed that the pros almost never physically move their truck counters to deliver supply. Instead they position them so that they deliver to locations where the trucks can return to their starting positions. Then when they move supply they simply pick up and place the supply counters at positions along this chain.

Not sure about Vassal, but if you're playing face-to-face play your "90%" game. You'll easily more than double the time you spend on your turn if you try to optimize everything 100%. Worse, you'll get too preoccupied with minute details, lose site of the big picture and you'll actually play worse than your 90% game.

Again, not sure about Vassal but when playing face-to-face I've found that each player can generally manage about 1-2 feet of front.

Realize that most of the scenarios don't forgive n00b play at all, especially if you're the attacker. To do well you need a basic level of competence, not just knowledge of the rules, so don't be afraid to reset if you're just starting out and things get off the rails.

Regarding planning: stay focused on the big picture! Have a reason for doing what you're doing. Don't just attack for the sake of attacking and remember it's a game of maneuver. The most efficient way to kill units is to dislodge them, never to attack them directly. Look at the *map* and, again, the various *networks* both yours and your opponents when deciding what intermediate goals are worthwhile. If you focus too much on enemy combat units you'll get suckered into making direct attacks without any purpose.

Admittedly this kind of planning is easier said than done. It's this planning that really makes OCS difficult to learn as opposed to learning the rules but it's also what separates OCS from other games and makes it so rewarding.
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