Gunky Gamer
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If you don't feel any need to play a game anymore, go ahead and trade it. They'll never know and you'll have been buying games for another ten years.

If your kids wind up liking games, they'll be thrilled to play almost anything on your shelf when the time comes. Keep your favorites and put the rest up for trade.

Things you should not get rid of are: lego, blocks, real metal tonka trucks and your very best matchbox cars. I've never forgiven my own parents for purging their basement and I subsequently spent about a bajillion dollars buying them for my kids.
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Gláucio Reis
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I agree with the previous poster. I would only keep games that are very special in some way, particularly if they would be very hard or expensive to reacquire (in my case, Star Wars: The Queen's Gambit and Die Schlacht der Dinosaurier, for example).
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Kevin C.
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Quote:
How do any of you parents out there know what is worth hanging on to?


I'm with you, man. I've got over 350 games and a ton are there because, "Well, he will want to play this with me one day."

My son is now 12, so we are cracking the GMT stuff I've had for years sitting there. It's pretty cool.

So, as others have said, the stance is pretty impractical and emotional. Maybe your kids will never want to play these things.

On the other hand, playing the copy of War of the Ring or Twilight Struggle that has been taking up space for years with my son is pretty awesome.

Not much practical help, I know, but my romantic advice is if you have the space, hold on to them. There is something to said about anticipation. The potential gave me happiness in something to look forward to, and although my kids won't play them all, the ones we have gotten to have justified the space.

Kevin
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Tony Go
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If you're having hull problems I feel bad for you son, I've got 99 problems but a breach ain't one.
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As much as I love the future and the possibilities it can bring, I think we should hold the future to the same regards as we do the past- that is to say, not to dwell on either of them.

It's good to learn from the past, and plan for the future, but fearing that your child may never experience a particular game is actually the opposite of foresight. Keep playing games until one absolutely strikes a chord with you as something to be shared with your loved ones- not out of fear, but out of shared experience.

I have a sealed copy of The Little Prince Pop-Up book I have no doubt in my mind I will want to save for my own kids.

 
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Pas L
Australia
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Don't project too much on to your kids (not saying you are). But otherwise hold on to games for as long as you want to, provided you have the space to do so.

Why not, after all?
 
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Mindy Basi
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That's a lot of games to store. I agree, keep lots but not all.

You will never know what your kids will like, or dislike. I like deckbuilders, turns out my son prefers games like Twilight Imperium.

Keep the ones that you enjoy and can express enthusiasm for. Some games are classics, and deserve a shelf spot, others are just run of the mill and could probably find new homes.
 
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