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Eldritch Horror» Forums » Rules

Subject: On "Not reading results until passing or failing" rss

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Tim Pierzina
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Quote:
...we recommend a player other than the active investigator reads encounter cards and does not reveal the results of passing or failing a test that has not yet been resolved.


This is what our group is doing, we're just wondering if a certain card applied or not. It was an encounter where you find a potion and the player may choose to drink the potion to gain +1 to a stat or not. In the following sentence it explains that if you drink the potion you gain a condition as well (I can't remember which).

Do you guys think that downside should be read aloud or kept secret until they choose to drink the potion?
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Michael Carter
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We usually always read the whole card.
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Max Maloney
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I would totally play that way, but I can't fault people who prefer to read ahead.
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Chris
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Interestingly, we play Arkham Horror "blind" as you describe - but with EH there's less margin for error (we've found), so the need to make informed decisions is a lot greater; consequently, we read the whole card (except for the flip side of spells/conditions/etc).
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Greg Filpus
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The cards where I'd definitely want to read everything are the Other Worlds whose first paragraph is "You may spend a Clue to resolve the pass effect." In those cards, the two results test different skills, and both close the gate if you pass. The reward from having a Clue is being able to use a different skill, which isn't a reward at all if you don't know what it is.
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Jonan Jello
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Tim, what is the quote from?

Marlowespade wrote:
Interestingly, we play Arkham Horror "blind" as you describe - but with EH there's less margin for error (we've found), so the need to make informed decisions is a lot greater; consequently, we read the whole card (except for the flip side of spells/conditions/etc).

I've never played Arkham, so I appreciate your insight with Eldritch's difficulty/margin of error.

Only in my last few games of Eldritch Horror, have I 'peeked ahead' to see what a pass and fail would mean, but of course, never on spells and conditions. If I recall correctly, it was in a situation as Greg described.

 
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Jan Probst
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Kiel
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For flavor we might not read text out ahead of time, but no decisions are made with bullshit fog of war hiding relevant info (ie, if needed, card reader will inform active player of the correct decision).
 
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Xelto G
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Once you've played enough, just starting the card is enough. "It's poker night!" is enough to indicate that the generic city card we drew requires an influence test to gain a random ally on a success, or a debt on a failure.

After the obligatory jokes about the vatican missionary being in the game, of course. (First three times in a row, it was him.)
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Matt Steski
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My group has always played (Arkham and Eldritch) with the rule "stop reading after a check is called for or a choice needs to be made," so I'd stop before the downside. I think the biggest strength of both games is how immersive their theme is, and a huge part of Lovecraftian horror is fear of the unknown!
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M.C.Crispy
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With EH - and especially with complex encounters - I like to read the card as a story, missing out all the stuff about checks completely (while rolling the dice at the appropriate time). For example "You meet an old man who offers to sell you a vase; you fail to notice the spikes in the base, take a Poison Condition" (the - failed - rolls occur after "vase" and "base" in this fictitious Encounter). I like the way EH sets out the cards to facilitate this approach, it really adds to the immersion.
 
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Gary Boyd
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It's a much more immersive experience without reading the entire card, but playing solo makes that pretty difficult.
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Eric Baumgarten
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In our sessions, one player is usually in charge of reading encounters( usually me). I most often stop when the test part is gotten to. I will usually read ahead and make a determination if more info would be beneficial or just slowing down the game. I know there is a SMALL margin for error, but don't want to " play God".
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Allison Macrae
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We've played with someone who wanted to keep everyone else in the dark, and I can understand that narrative impulse. At the same time, we've played the game enough to have memorized most of the effects, and while it often makes no difference, and we leave the pass or fail (whichever didn't happen) unread, EH has a number of effects that you can spend on a critical die roll. It seems unfair to force someone to play their Lucky Rabbit's Foot blind when going up on a game winning check against Yog-Sothoth, while also penalizing new players who haven't memorized the cards, and strategically encouraging us to retain all of our memories about cards, rather than not thinking about them, and being allowed to ask if it matters.
 
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Daniel Honig
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gathraawn wrote:
At the same time, we've played the game enough to have memorized most of the effects, and while it often makes no difference, and we leave the pass or fail (whichever didn't happen) unread, EH has a number of effects that you can spend on a critical die roll. It seems unfair to force someone to play their Lucky Rabbit's Foot blind when going up on a game winning check against Yog-Sothoth, while also penalizing new players who haven't memorized the cards, and strategically encouraging us to retain all of our memories about cards, rather than not thinking about them, and being allowed to ask if it matters.


We play blind, but we know that people are going to memorize the cards after playing enough. To counteract that, any player with rerolls or potential modifiers can always ask "Do I need to pass this?" and get a sense of how important the test is. That puts new players on a more even footing and gets rid of the game-winning check scenario.
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"Every Board Game I Reach Is Dead"
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It depends on the wording- I haven't got the game to hand at the moment.

We have always read Arkham Horror encounters 'blind' as this variant suggests, so doing the same with EH was little different to us.

Generally you get a feel for how far to read on each card. Often in encounters in AH it says things like 'you reach out for something (Luck -1).' or 'try you hand at reading the text (Lore -1) to see if you can discover any information.' These are pretty simple- you just read to the end of the sentence and then continue on after the check is made see what happens.

There are a few though that ask you to make a choice in one sentence and then give you the choices in the next. When these come up we usually read ahead and see if its narratively important to know the decision being made. There's some where knowing exactly what you are doing is important, but others where you are plausibly just picking a fork in the road and when these come up we let the player taking the encounter make the decision before carrying on.

We had an encounter in EH that says something like 'you are offered a powerful artefact but who knows what the eventual cost might be? Do you accept?'. In this situation we did not tell them what they were getting until they choose to accept. Narratively they wouldn't know until they accepted so that's how we played it.

Besides its always fun watching people pulling Jenga face whilst they try to weigh up the chances that what Eldritch Horror offers won't just be a slap in the face. goo
 
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"Every Board Game I Reach Is Dead"
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Andarel wrote:
We play blind, but we know that people are going to memorize the cards after playing enough. To counteract that, any player with rerolls or potential modifiers can always ask "Do I need to pass this?" and get a sense of how important the test is. That puts new players on a more even footing and gets rid of the game-winning check scenario.


We also do this! If the encounter says you will be devoured we will nudge nudge them with 'Don't fail this one' and 'Have you failed? Dude, are you SURE you don't want to reroll?!' goo
 
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Jesse G
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mccrispy wrote:
With EH - and especially with complex encounters - I like to read the card as a story, missing out all the stuff about checks completely (while rolling the dice at the appropriate time).



I can see both sides to this thread. On one side, not reading all the text allows for further exploration in later game. Reading the whole card allows for that story to permeate through the cards to the player. Plus understanding the consequences is key to gameplay.

AS the game is constantly trying to off you, knowing all your choices could be considered "life insurance"

 
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ICE 0ne
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I don't get to play enough to memorize. Plus I have a bad memory anyway. I prefer to not have the entire card read. It feels kinda "cheap" knowing your choice doesn't matter or knowing what's going to happen. It makes your decision a less meaningful. I also hate hearing my friends brag about how often they win at games only to find out that they're not playing by the right rules.
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